May 15th: Learning Space talk about Dawn Mission to Vesta

By on May 15, 2013 in
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Podcaster: Pamela L. Gay ; Brett Denevi & Paul Schenk

Title : Learning Space talk about Dawn Mission to Vesta

Organization: CosmoQuest : Space App Challenge

Link : You can watch the video in: http://youtu.be/R5OFqceOzUg

Educational Materials from Dawn http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/DawnClassroo…
Potato Light Curves! – http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/DawnClassroo…
SAFELY playing with dry ice to make comets – http://www.astro.virginia.edu/dsbk/fi…
Vesta with a 3D printer – http://www.flickr.com/photos/noisyast…
Dawn mission – http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/
Vesta citizen science – http://cosmoquest.org/mappers/vesta/

Description: Dawn’s year-long orbit of Vesta, its first destination in the main asteroid belt, revealed a mysterious world unique in the solar system. Roughly the diameter of the state of Arizona, Vesta is at once huge by asteroid standards (indeed, planetary scientists consider it a mini-planet), and yet small enough in radius that impacts make a whopping impression.

Bio: Brett Denevi studies Vesta’s regolith, the relatively fluffy surface layer, made of dust and rocky debris leftover by impacts.

Paul Schenk explores Vesta’s craters, especially their weird shapes—often caused by that shifting regolith—and the tales they tell of Vesta’s history!

Brett and Paul will show how their investigations of Vesta’s weird and wonderful craters and pits tell the tale of the giant asteroid’s history, as well as share the special role participating scientists have on NASA missions.

End of podcast:

365 Days of Astronomy
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