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Podcaster: Rob Sparks. Guest: Tomás Ahumada

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Title: NOIRLab – The Shortest Long Gamma Ray Burst

Organization: NOIRLab

Links: www.noao.edu ; @NOAONorth; http://www.lsst.org/ ;https://nationalastro.org/ ; https://www.facebook.com/NOIRLabAstro ; https://www.instagram.com/noirlabastro/ ; https://www.youtube.com/noirlabastro ; @NOIRLabAstro

Description: 

Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are some of the most energetic events in the universe. There are two categories of GRBs: short and long. Extensive studies of a recent GRB show the dividing line between short and long is not clear as this “long” GRB was exceptionally short! Learn how Tomás Ahumada and a team of astronomers used data from a wide variety of telescopes to unravel the mystery of this very short long GRB!

Bio: Rob Sparks is a science education specialist in the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) group at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) and works on the Galileoscope project (www.galileoscope.org), providing design, dissemination and professional development. He blogs at halfastro.wordpress.com.

Tomás Ahumada is a fourth year Astronomy PhD candidate at the University of Maryland (UMD) and a research assistant at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He is originally from Chile, and he is currently searching for optical counterparts of short gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves. He is working with Dr. Leo Singer from NASA using the Zwicky Transient Facility to cover large portions of the sky and maximize the probability to find transients in the northern night sky.

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