All posts by Richard B. Drumm

Richard Drumm is President of the Charlottesville Astronomical Society and President of 3D – Drumm Digital Design, a video production company with clients such as Kodak, Xerox and GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals. He was an observer with the UVa Parallax Program at McCormick Observatory in 1981 & 1982. He’s found that his greatest passion in life is public outreach astronomy and he pursues it at every opportunity.

By Richard B. Drumm on September 26, 2018 in
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When looked at with X-ray telescopes, they shone as bright as a million suns combined. #spacescoop @unawe at #365DaysOfAstro

By Richard B. Drumm on September 19, 2018 in
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Healthy oceans are essential to our survival. They help to feed us, clean the water we drink, and most importantly, the oceans provide most of the oxygen we breathe — they are the lungs of our planet.

By Richard B. Drumm on August 31, 2018 in
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Astronomer just measured the masses of around 50 supermassive black holes that each one is 5 million times more massive than Sun! @unawe #spacescoop #365DaysOfAstro #news #children #astronomy

By Richard B. Drumm on August 24, 2018 in
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Most of us are familiar with magnets. But have you ever wondered how they work? more at #365DaysOfAstro Sunspots or Beauty Spots: The Sun’s More Attractive Than Ever! #spacescoop @unawe

By Richard B. Drumm on August 15, 2018 in
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Astronomers have spotted a new contender for Dancing with the Stars! And in an unlikely place – deep space!

By Richard B. Drumm on July 31, 2018 in
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Do you live in a part of the world that experiences snowstorms or dust storms? Rosetta experienced this kind of storm for 2 years. more at #365DaysOfAstro

By Richard B. Drumm on July 13, 2018 in
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There have been over 3,700 exoplanets discovered so far. Some seriously clever techniques have been used to hunt down these alien worlds. Astronomers define a new technique to discover baby planet!

By Richard B. Drumm on June 30, 2018 in
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In a recent study, a computer ran a “machine learning” software program called the Deflector Selector. It was fed millions of simulations of asteroids careening towards Earth. Each one resulted in either the asteroid hitting or missing the Earth.