Early Bacterial Life May Have Formed Far Earlier Than Thought

Early Bacterial Life May Have Formed Far Earlier Than Thought

An analysis of microscopic features in rocks from the Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt in Quebec, Canada, which date back between 3.75 and 4.28 billion years, finds evidence of possible microbial life. Plus, a supermassive black hole precursor, temperatures on Neptune, check-ins with various spacecraft, and our weekly What’s Up segment.

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Rubble Pile Asteroids May Be Extinct Comets

Rubble Pile Asteroids May Be Extinct Comets

After detecting high levels of organic matter using remote sensors at the asteroid Ryugu, numerical models show that it’s possible that rubble pile asteroids are actually extinct comets. Plus, the Cosmic Optical Background, Enceladus’s tiger stripes, and this week in rocket history, we look back at STS-45.

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Mars Could Have Supported Life Longer Than Thought

Mars Could Have Supported Life Longer Than Thought

A NASA-funded simulation of early Mars revealed that the climate three billion years ago on the red planet was very similar to Earth now, with a stable ocean in the northern hemisphere. This new timeline would have given life another 500 million years to develop. Plus, a dwarf galaxy, Saturn’s aurorae, a Soyuz launch, and an interview with Dr. Adam Szabo, mission scientist for the Parker Solar Probe.

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Newly Discovered Bright Transient Radio Source is a Mystery

Newly Discovered Bright Transient Radio Source is a Mystery

Scientists using the Murchison Widefield Array in Australia recently discovered an extremely bright source of radio waves, releasing bursts of energy three times an hour. That timing makes the object behave unlike anything else seen to date, leaving the research team with a new mystery to unravel. Plus, everything else is about water today, all over the solar system, and we present this week’s What’s Up segment.

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JWST and the 30 Days of Terror

JWST and the 30 Days of Terror

With the successful launch of the JWST, the focus turns to the complicated process of unfurling the sunshield and unfolding the mirror. We’ll look at just where NASA is in the process and how much farther we have to go before first light. Plus, Earth and supernovae, and in this week’s What’s Up, we look forward to 2022’s astronomy events.

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