Hubble Discovers Star Hidden by Companion’s Supernova

Hubble Discovers Star Hidden by Companion’s Supernova

Data from the Hubble Space Telescope has determined that the newly discovered companion of a star that went supernova had its outer hydrogen layer siphoned off before the explosion. The results support the theory that massive stars generally form and evolve as binary systems. Plus, rocks from space, Crew-4 comes home, searching for life beyond Earth, and another Canon lens review.

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Stellar Death Just Got More Lit

Stellar Death Just Got More Lit

Remember that new object, COW, named for a strange supernova? We’ve seen four more of these Fast Blue Optical Transits, and new research may even have figured out just how and why they occur. Plus, Crew-4 launches, a bunch of planetary science news, micronovae, and this week in rocket history, we look back at the San Marco program.

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New Fossil Data Shows Cascadia’s Dangers

New Fossil Data Shows Cascadia’s Dangers

An analysis of sediment core samples taken at the Salmon River Estuary in Oregon provides evidence that the massive 1700 Cascadia earthquake caused 15 meters of slip along the shoreline, which lead to over a meter of coastal subsidence. Plus, all the rocket launches, a few mission updates, making Mars bricks with urea, and an interview with Maggie Thompson from UC Santa Cruz about using methane as a biosignature.

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Early Bacterial Life May Have Formed Far Earlier Than Thought

Early Bacterial Life May Have Formed Far Earlier Than Thought

An analysis of microscopic features in rocks from the Nuvvuagittuq Supracrustal Belt in Quebec, Canada, which date back between 3.75 and 4.28 billion years, finds evidence of possible microbial life. Plus, a supermassive black hole precursor, temperatures on Neptune, check-ins with various spacecraft, and our weekly What’s Up segment.

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New Analysis Reveals W Boson Particle Far Heavier Than Expected

New Analysis Reveals W Boson Particle Far Heavier Than Expected

Despite being shut down a decade ago, the Collider Detector at Fermilab provided enormous amounts of data, some of which have recently been re-analyzed, leading to the discovery that the W boson is actually more massive than calculations and predictions expected. Plus, another JWST update, the newest most distant galaxy, gravitational waves, and an interview with Dr. Kelsi Singer about cryovolcanoes on Pluto.

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