Six Early, Massive, “Dead” Galaxies Found in Hubble Data

Six Early, Massive, “Dead” Galaxies Found in Hubble Data

While searching for objects deep in the universe’s history, at about three billion years of age, researchers found six massive but “dead” galaxies in Hubble and ALMA data, a strange finding for a time period known for prolific star birth. Plus, planetary science from the EPSC2021 conference and this week’s What’s Up.

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Supernovae and Galaxies Being Used to Solve Astrophysics’ Biggest Questions

Supernovae and Galaxies Being Used to Solve Astrophysics’ Biggest Questions

Two new studies are attempting to solve a couple of big puzzles in astrophysics: Is the Hubble constant actually constant? And why do galaxies have flat rotation curves? Plus, a young star’s circumstellar disk, the search for stellar-mass black holes, magnesium in the deep waters of Neptune and Uranus, and an interview with PSI scientist David Horvath regarding possibly active volcanism on Mars.

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Not Surprising Anyone, Satellite Proliferation Contributes to Light Pollution

Not Surprising Anyone, Satellite Proliferation Contributes to Light Pollution

A new study examined the effects of recent increases in the number of space objects orbiting Earth and found that the proliferation of satellites contributes to a nearly ten percent increase over natural lighting of the night sky. Plus, Mars, Uranus, Neptune, ancient Earth, volcanoes, and our weekly What’s Up segment.

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Strange Exoplanet Could Be Similar to Theoretical Planet 9

Strange Exoplanet Could Be Similar to Theoretical Planet 9

HD 106906 b is an exoplanet 336 light-years away, 11 times the size of Jupiter, and possibly an analog of our own not-yet-discovered Planet 9. Plus, a large body of water ice has been discovered on Mars, and we interview lead author Dan Berman of the Planetary Science Institute. Also included, stories on Jupiter, Uranus’s moons, a young galaxy, and how space weather impacts habitability.

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