NASA’s TESS Maps Symphony of Pulsating Red Giant Stars

NASA’s TESS Maps Symphony of Pulsating Red Giant Stars

NASA’s TESS spacecraft, which is primarily used to search for exoplanets, has now observed a veritable symphony of pulsating red giant stars, each with its own internal vibrations. This work was presented at this week’s TESS Science Conference. Plus, some more climate change news (bad) and superflares may be less harmful to exoplanets than thought (good).

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Solar Systems Vary From Star Type to Star Type

Solar Systems Vary From Star Type to Star Type

In new research, scientists examined the populations of stars observed by the Kepler and K2 missions and found that the solar systems were different depending on the type of star involved. Plus, CHIME results, a brown dwarf’s atmosphere, a stream of stars in the Milky Way, and an interview with PSI’s Dr. Candice Hansen about the recent Ganymede flyby of NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

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Scientists Generate 3D Model of Planetary Nebula From New Data

Scientists Generate 3D Model of Planetary Nebula From New Data

Using spectrographic data from several different telescopes, a team put together a three-dimensional model of planetary nebula NGC 1514, which allowed them to further study the shape and internal motion of the object. Plus, Antarctic sea ice, a history of current flow, magnetic waves, and an interview with astronaut Cady Coleman.

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Anatomical Dissection of Planetary Nebula Using Hubble Images

Anatomical Dissection of Planetary Nebula Using Hubble Images

Our coverage of last week’s AAS meeting continues with new work on the formation of planetary nebula based on Hubble Space Telescope images. Plus, a massive quasar in the early universe, water ice on Ganymede, a super-puff planet, and plans for taking spectra of Venus’ surface, featuring our guest, PSI scientist Dr. Darby Dyer.

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Latest Gaia Telescope Data Release Gives More Insight Into Milky Way

Latest Gaia Telescope Data Release Gives More Insight Into Milky Way

The release of the Gaia space telescope’s Early Data Release 3 has paved the way for a 3D map of the Milky Way, a glimpse at its history, and the acceleration of our own solar system. Plus, Alaskan volcanoes, the Stingray Nebula fades, and yes, that really was a Centaur rocket booster captured by the Earth. And we announce our first CosmoQuest Book Club selection!

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