Black Holes, Fast Radio Bursts, Dinosaurs and Rockets

Black Holes, Fast Radio Bursts, Dinosaurs and Rockets

As we return from our mini-break, we bring you some highlights of stories that happened while we were away, including black holes spiraling toward each other, the possible origin of a fast radio burst, and more information on the demise of the dinosaurs. Plus, Erik Madaus brings us updates on quite a few rocket launches.

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Newly Discovered Bright Transient Radio Source is a Mystery

Newly Discovered Bright Transient Radio Source is a Mystery

Scientists using the Murchison Widefield Array in Australia recently discovered an extremely bright source of radio waves, releasing bursts of energy three times an hour. That timing makes the object behave unlike anything else seen to date, leaving the research team with a new mystery to unravel. Plus, everything else is about water today, all over the solar system, and we present this week’s What’s Up segment.

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Carbon Molecules on Mars Open New Mystery

Carbon Molecules on Mars Open New Mystery

NASA’s Curiosity rover has discovered carbon isotopes on Mars which are usually caused by the degradation of biological methane, leading scientists to examine other potential reasons for the molecules. Plus, more Starlink satellites, their impact on observing, and This Week in Rocket History.

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New Class of Exoplanet Could Accelerate Search for Life

New Class of Exoplanet Could Accelerate Search for Life

Hycean worlds have hydrogen-rich atmospheres and are covered in oceans, making them prime candidates for the search for life outside our own solar system. These worlds are also more numerous and easier to find than Earth-like exoplanets. Plus, an update on the search for Planet 9 and how volcanoes may provide a climate safety valve.

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NASA’s TESS Maps Symphony of Pulsating Red Giant Stars

NASA’s TESS Maps Symphony of Pulsating Red Giant Stars

NASA’s TESS spacecraft, which is primarily used to search for exoplanets, has now observed a veritable symphony of pulsating red giant stars, each with its own internal vibrations. This work was presented at this week’s TESS Science Conference. Plus, some more climate change news (bad) and superflares may be less harmful to exoplanets than thought (good).

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