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By jagrier on January 5, 2018 in

As you know from having searched for impact craters on images here at CosmoQuest, some craters are are easier to spot and measure than others. One of the things that makes a crater easier to identify is a prominent shadow cast from the rim. Such shadows are created when the source of illumination (the sun) […]

By Nicole Gugliucci on January 5, 2015 in

In this series of posts, we’ll be breaking down the first MoonMappers paper by Robbins et al. showcasing YOUR work.  Read Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4 We’ve shown in this series of posts why counting craters is important, how it’s been done throughout the years, what the experts and volunteers had to say, […]

By Nicole Gugliucci on June 10, 2014 in

In this series of posts, we’ll be breaking down the recent MoonMappers paper by Robbins et al. showcasing YOUR work.  Read Part 1 and Part 2 Won’t The Real Crater Count Please Stand Up? Now that we’ve set up why we’re counting and measuring craters and reviewed the history of the methods of crater counting, let’s […]

By Nicole Gugliucci on May 20, 2014 in

In this series of posts, we’ll be breaking down the recent MoonMappers paper by Robbins et al. showcasing YOUR work.  Read Part 1 In the first part of this series, I gave you a background overview on why accurate crater counts on surfaces like the Moon and Mercury are important. Now I’m gong to dive […]

By Nicole Gugliucci on April 22, 2014 in

In this series of posts, we’ll be breaking down the recent MoonMappers paper by Robbins et al. showcasing YOUR work.  We were super-excited as the paper worked on by this team using your contributions was accepted by the journal Icarus. We put out a press release, as did CU Boulder, and Stuart made two great […]