Category | Planet

By andreameado on February 13, 2018 in

This is a guest post from Andrea Meado, Image Data Scientist, and part of our Johnson Space Center (JSC) Image Detective Science Team We observe clouds from the ground and lower atmosphere (aircraft) and experience weather conditions associated with them such as precipitation and temperature. Astronauts in space see clouds from a different, much higher […]

By ajagge on February 5, 2018 in

This is a guest post from Amy Jagge, Image Data Scientist, and part of our Johnson Space Center (JSC) Image Detective Science Team Education facilitates the potential for opportunity, prompts curiosity, and nurtures ingenuity. Yet, the instructional strategies used by educators can significantly influence the degree to which learning impacts an individual. Innovative techniques for […]

By jagrier on February 2, 2018 in

As we’ve discussed in this series of posts, impact cratering events are highly energetic. They do much more than explode a huge hole in the ground – such events change the nature of the rocks themselves. Target rocks can be broken to pieces, shattered into dust, shocked with high pressures, completely melted, or even turned […]

By Susie Murph on February 1, 2018 in

If you had an interesting experience last year observing the Eclipse, with us or elsewhere, and are interested in writing about it, we have an opportunity from the ASP! The Astronomical Society of the Pacific is pleased to announce a new book to document and celebrate the efforts of professional astronomers, outreach professionals, citizen scientists, […]

By jagrier on January 26, 2018 in

As promised, here is our second mystery concerning craters and incidence angle. This is an image of a region of the Moon south of Copernicus crater. Take a good look. Something isn’t quite right … Can you see what is off? If yes, you’ve probably spent a lot of time looking at images here at […]