Archive | Mercury Mappers


Come see CosmoQuest at NSTA in Atlanta this week!

Are you going to the National Science Teachers Association National Conference in Atlanta this week, March 15–18, 2018? CosmoQuest will be there! Please join us for one of our workshops listed below and pick up special CQ swag. EarthMatch: Making Earth Science Culturally Relevant March 15, 2018, 03:30 PM – 04:30 PM Thursday — Georgia […]

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A Major Update to a Classic! CosmoQuest releases Mappers 2.0

A Major Update to a Classic! CosmoQuest releases Mappers 2.0

The CosmoQuest Citizen Science facility released a major update to its Mappers software. This software previously demonstrated that everyday people can map craters as effectively as a group of professionals. With version 2.0, CosmoQuest invites the public to use their skills to answer new science questions related to Mars and Mercury. The public can use […]

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In this plot we see the transition diameter of four worlds plotted against the gravity at the surface of each of those worlds (The Moon, Mercury, Earth, and Mars.).  (From LPI/USRA, at,  They site -  Credit: Illustration from an educational poster, Geological Effects of Impact Cratering, David A. Kring, NASA Univ. of Arizona Space Imagery Center, 2006.)

CQ Science – Post 6: Simple to Complex

In previous posts we’ve discussed how the very smallest craters have “simple” shapes, and that the somewhat larger craters have “complex” shapes. You may have been wondering why that is, and what we mean by “larger” anyway? How large is large? Well, that turns out to be dependent on the planet where the crater is […]

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Venus Corona.  It isn’t a multi-ring impact basin, but a result of magma (lava moving underground).  These are common features on Venus, and help us to understand that it was volcanically a very active place.

CQ Science – Post 5: Crater Confusion

Here at CosmoQuest we spend a lot of time looking at craters. It is a job that only people can do – not computers (yet, anyway). Scientists have been trying to write programs that will effectively identify and count craters, but they have met with only limited success. As noted, craters are not always perfectly […]

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SciStarter: Find the Citizen Science Project for You!

As everyone reading this here undoubtedly knows, CosmoQuest hosts numerous Citizen Science projects that range from marking craters to identifying places on Earth using photos taken from the ISS. What you may not realize is that we are closely affiliated with another ongoing citizen science research project, SciStarter. We would like to encourage all of […]

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