Daily Space 6/26/2019

By on June 26, 2019 in

The #DailySpace brings you the universe at 10am PST / 1pm EST / 5pm GMT on twitch.tv/CosmoQuestX. Today’s #spacenews includes:

The MASER 14 SSC/ESA suborbital microgravity payload was launched on a Brazilian-developed VSB-30 sounding rocket from ESRANGE (Kiruna, Sweden) to 260 km apogee at 0652 UTC June 24.

Sweden Launch ESA Experiments Aboard Maser 14 Sounding Rocket

“Just 45 seconds after liftoff, the rocket’s upper stage left Earth’s atmosphere. [ie., made it over the 100 km mark from the ground, which is stupid fast!] After reaching an altitude of 244.8 kilometres, the rocket began its freefall back to Earth giving the experiments onboard six minutes of weightlessness. Approximately 15 minutes after it lifted off from Esrange, the rocket’s payload stage returned to Earth touching down under parachutes in the wilderness of Sweden.

“‘Helicopters will return the experiments to Esrange and the whole process will be completed in two hours, but the unique results typically give many years of data to process and analyse,’ explained Antonio Verga, ESA’s head of non-Space Station payloads and platforms.”

Chinese launch – THEY ACTUALLY ORDERED AN EVACUATION OF THE CRASH ZONES BEFORE THE LAUNCH!

Asked residents to turn off power, telephone lines to prevent fires. Instructed them to close doors and windows to prevent theft.

https://twitter.com/LaunchStuff/status/1143177560571990017

Chinese launch: June 24 @ 18:09 UTC BeiDou satellite!
The BNU-1 launch was delayed for unknown reasons.

Video link: https://www.weibo.com/3922221653/HAsXBwLH1

SpaceX Falcon Heavy Launch was June 25 @ 6:30am (Video below – Launch starts at 24:40)

Highlights:
If you’re looking for a list, the spaceflightnow.com stream is the best bet, I think: just read through to find what you’re interested in, or either just study up for the Q&A re: all the FH pieces in orbit now.

Be patient: the page takes a few moments to load fully. Once it does, you’ll have a more or less complete, accurate timeline of the entire mission.

Upcoming at time of publication:
JUN 27 04:30 UTC // June 27 @ 12:30am
Spaceflight Rideshare (BlackSky Global 4) (“Make It Rain”)

“The mission is named ‘Make it Rain’ in a nod to the high volume of rainfall in Seattle, where Spaceflight is headquartered, as well in New Zealand where Launch Complex 1 is located. Among the payloads on the mission for Spaceflight are BlackSky’s Global-4 satellite and Melbourne Space Program’s ACRUX-1 CubeSat.”

Payloads are BlackSky Global-4 (“remote sensing” — global intelligence platform, their words) which is the 4th out of a constellation of 60 satellites.

Melbourne Space Program’s ACRUX-1 CubeSat.

JUL 02: Orion Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) – Purpose: collect data on the separation environment.

It even has a mission patch with 3 stars at the top, 14 stars under the line, 1 star on the Florida coast — Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Total of 18 stars. Patch is in shape of Orion Capsule. The test itself will use a purpose-built partial launch vehicle of the sort used during the Apollo testing phases. It’s sole purpose in life is to get the Orion capsule & abort system up in the air so they can be tested “live.”

The Launch Abort System will activate after 55 seconds of ascent at an altitude of 9,400 meters at Max-Q while the booster is still firing.

JUL 05 – 05:41 UTC – Meteor-M (2-2)
Meteorology satellite, 2nd of a group of planned 6

First and second stage of Soyuz-2.1b that will launch Meteor-M 2-2

Roscosmos specialists have completed the refueling of the “Fregat” dispersal unit with fuel components.

JUL 06 – no time set at this point – Falcon Eye 1
A high-resolution optical reconnaissance system for United Arab Emirates. Allegedly capable of resolution down to 70 cm^2 over a ~20 km wide image track. Falcon Eye-2 will be launched later this year
Mass is less than 1500 kg — 750 2L bottles of soda

Join us tomorrow for more Daily Space news!

About Susie Murph

Susie Murph is a Communications Specialist at CosmoQuest. She also produces Astronomy Cast and the Weekly Space Hangout.

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