May 29th: Time Flies on an Alien World

By on May 29, 2014 in
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Podcaster:  Richard Drumm

Title: Space Scoop: Time Flies on an Alien World

Organization:  Astrosphere New Media

Linkhttp://speakeasynarration.com ; http://unawe.org/kids/unawe1418/

Description: Space scoop, news for children.

Bio: Richard Drumm is President of the Charlottesville Astronomical Society and President of 3D – Drumm Digital Design, a video production company with clients such as Kodak, Xerox and GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals. He was an observer with the UVa Parallax Program at McCormick Observatory in 1981 & 1982. He has found that his greatest passion in life is public outreach astronomy and he pursues it at every opportunity.

Today’s sponsor: This episode of “365 Days of Astronomy” is sponsored by — no one. We still need sponsors for many days in 2013, so please consider sponsoring a day or two. Just click on the “Donate” button on the lower left side of this webpage, or contact us at signup@365daysofastronomy.org.

Transcript:

This is  365 Days of Astronomy. Today we bring you a new episode in our Space Scoop Series. This show is produced in collaboration with Universe Awareness, a program that strives to inspire every child with our wonderful cosmos.

Artist illustration of Beta Pictoris b. Credit: ESO/UNAWE

Artist illustration of Beta Pictoris b. Credit: ESO/UNAWE

Our Universe is constantly in motion. Not so long ago, Space Scoop explained that right this moment you’re hurtling through space at hundreds of thousands of kilometres per hour! The Earth is moving, our Solar System is moving and even our Galaxy is gliding through space.

We use the movements of Earth through space define to measure time. We call the time it takes Earth to complete one full rotation a ‘day’. A year is the time it takes Earth to complete one full orbit around the Sun.

But the length of one rotation and one orbit can be different on other planets. For example, one orbit (or ‘year’) on Mercury takes just 87 Earth days. This means Mercury orbits the Sun four times in every Earth year. So, if you were 10 years old on Earth, you’d be 40 years old on Mercury!

The length of day is also different on other planets. For example, one day on Jupiter lasts just 10 Earth hours. Astronomers have now measured the length of a day on a planet outside our Solar System (an exo-planet)!

Beta Pictoris b is a planet orbiting a distant star. The planet is 16 times larger than Earth, yet it has a day that lasts just 8 hours! This means the planet must be spinning through space at almost 100,000 kilometres per hour!

Cool Fact: Beta Pictoris B is rotating much quicker than any planet in our Solar System. By comparison, Jupiter rotates at about 47 000 km per hour, while the Earth spins at only 1700 km per hour.

365 Days of Astronomy is a community podcast made possible thanks to the contributions of people like you. Please consider donating at 365DaysofAstronomy.org/Donate

End of podcast:

365 Days of Astronomy
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The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by Astrosphere New Media. Audio post-production by Richard Drumm. Bandwidth donated by libsyn.com and wizzard media. You may reproduce and distribute this audio for non-commercial purposes. Please consider supporting the podcast with a few dollars (or Euros!). Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org. In the new year the 365 Days of Astronomy project will be something different than before….Until then…goodbye

About Richard B. Drumm

Richard Drumm is President of the Charlottesville Astronomical Society and President of 3D – Drumm Digital Design, a video production company with clients such as Kodak, Xerox and GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals. He was an observer with the UVa Parallax Program at McCormick Observatory in 1981 & 1982. He’s found that his greatest passion in life is public outreach astronomy and he pursues it at every opportunity.

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