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Thread: The universe looking like neurons.

  1. #1
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    The universe looking like neurons.

    Sorry if this is flogging a dead horse, but I did do a search and haven't found a topic on this.

    After looking at simulated pictures of the universe (not sure how realistic they are), I noticed how it looks just like the inside of a brain or nerouns.

    Here is a pic of them side by side.

    http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/picko...ron-galaxy.jpg

    What do you guys make of this? I know it probably sounds stupid but it makes me think that maybe the universe could be conscious. (which is something that I actually thought of before I saw what the simulated universe looked like).

    *Edit*

    Ah forget it, dumb topic. When I think about it I bet there's all sorts of structures that when magnified or seen from far enough away that will look just like neurons, but it wont mean it's possible that they could be conscious.

  2. #2
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    "Pssst*
    Hey.
    Yeah you.

    I'm Charlie, one of your neurons.

    Now, stop freaking out. I'm trying to tell you something. No, put the phone down.

    Listen... me and the guys, we been talking. And we've decided that if you don't stop bombarding us with heavy psychedelic chemicals, we're all going to start singing 'It's a Small World' in chorus.

    I know, it's awful... But it's for our and your own good.

    Thanks."

  3. #3
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    No wonders cosmologists aren't making any progress studying branes ... they looking at the wrong type!

  4. #4
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    I've noticed the similarity too--it also sort of looks like certain graphs of the World Wide Web. I suspect any large phenomenon made of a lot of smaller, nearly identical interconnected parts has maybe a finite number of rough patterns it would take, and this is just one of them.

    Incidentally, it's certainly not inconceivable for the universe to act as a big brain, but with the speed of light limit, in all the 13.8 billion years the universe has existed, I figure it has not had enough time to form even a very tiny piece of a thought. It's not "I think, therefore I am" so much as the beginning of the breath to say "I".

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  6. #6
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    I know, it's so amazing! I love patterns in nature!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross PK81 View Post
    Here is a pic of them side by side....
    http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/picko...ron-galaxy.jpg
    Uh, that simulation of the "universe" looks considerably contrived. What's with all the fiber-like tendrils, all colorfully connected? I was going to say the neurons of the brain are massively and physically connected, and that's an understatement. The universe, not so much so. The pervading hydrogen and helium gas of the early universe evolves by gravitationally condensing into structures small and large. Clusters, strands, walls, and sheets have apparently formed, unlike the linked stringy simulation, which would seem to be a bit misleading....
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    Uh, that simulation of the "universe" looks considerably contrived.
    That image is from the millenium simulation.

    The largest N-body simulation of the universe

    The compare it with this galaxy map from The Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

    Note: The millenium simulation shows dark matter, which is why the strands look more stringy.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    Uh, that simulation of the "universe" looks considerably contrived. What's with all the fiber-like tendrils, all colorfully connected?
    I think the purple tendrils probably represent dark matter. On a large scale, it supposedly forms a web-like structure.

  10. #10
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    .

    This here piques my interest in arguments for why it must be that space is flat at superscopic / extra-Hubble radii.

    My observation is that a predatory hierarchical structure starts at the quark, possibly the string, and proceeds at logarithmic pace upwards until, bam, you hit the structures of superclusters and walls around soap bubble voids (E.g. Bootes), but somehow I am supposed to accept from the best minds (I read the Tegmark FAQ and several other linked items, thank yous, around) that structure ends once you hit space foam and you reach a regime of uniformity / isotropy. Compared to my observations of predatory hierarchical structure, this sounds too democratic, fair, equalitarian, nice, and kind. I would naively suspect that the logarithmic climb of structure should somehow predict a higher level of structure at some determinable radius, even if it is above, beneath, or beyond detection in various ways, and/or well outside our Hubble back 40. Why does structure have to stop at a Tempurpedic mattress? Where am I failing to think scientifically?

  11. #11
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    Hi, i'm bob, i had question that attracted me to the forum. But, ihappen t
    to know that atoms looking similar to the Universe
    is called either the quoincidence of opposites or
    The phonomena of opposites. I also was interested in th
    escavator vs dinosoaur question. Please excuse the s

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob richmon View Post
    Hi, i'm bob, i had question that attracted me to the forum. But, ihappen t
    to know that atoms looking similar to the Universe
    Atoms don't look anything like the universe.

    I also was interested in th escavator vs dinosoaur question.
    Have you seen one of those signs by the elevator, "Dinosaurs must be carried" ?

    Please excuse the s
    OK. S is forgiven.

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