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Thread: Oranges and fleas

  1. #1
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    Oranges and fleas

    I have several animals and am trying to keep them and house flea free without too many chemicals. I've read several sites and heard on the radio that orange oils dissolve fleas' exoskeletons. I've spread nematodes in the yard, use diatomaceous earth in their favorite places and use cedar to repel the insects.

    I'm really curious if the orange oils do dissolve flea exoskeletons?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinaa View Post
    I have several animals and am trying to keep them and house flea free without too many chemicals. I've read several sites and heard on the radio that orange oils dissolve fleas' exoskeletons. I've spread nematodes in the yard, use diatomaceous earth in their favorite places and use cedar to repel the insects.

    I'm really curious if the orange oils do dissolve flea exoskeletons?
    Well, you could always test it out. Get a microscope, a kids model should be good, get some orange oil, and get some fleas. To stop the fleas from jumping around, stick them to some tape. Get an eye dropper and put it on the fleas while looking through the microscope. See what happens. Unfortunatly, cats, if you have cats, really don't like the smell of orange oil and citris themselves.

  3. #3
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    from http://www.dirtdoctor.com/view_question.php?id=1293
    6. Pet treatment. Apply herbal powders of pennyroyal, lavender, eucalyptus, and/or rosemary. Pennyroyal is too strong to use on cats.

    Diatomaceous earth, is an inexpensive and effective tool to use as a dry powder on the pet's fur. Don't use it regularly because it's very drying to their skin. Citrus oil products can also help control fleas. Chop orange, grapefruit or other citrus skins or cut them into small pieces, then place in a pan of water. Simmer 15 minutes. Cool thoroughly. Pour into the animal's fur and cover the skin thoroughly. Pay special attention to areas that are hard for the pet to reach. All other forms of citrus also work but oranges seem to work best. This treatment is effective for skin rashes caused by flea bites. Commercial citrus products are also available.

    7. Indoor treatment. Treat infested carpets with diatomaceous earth or boric acid, but don't overdo it. For heavy infestations spray D-limonene (citrus) products on carpets and furniture. Baking soda dusted on carpets will also help. Dirty, infested carpets should be water extraction cleaned or completely removed from the house. Avoid all products that contain pyrethrum.

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    The dirt doctor is out of Dallas I think. He calls in to the organic gardening show here a lot.

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    Get some of the strong stuff from the vet, sometimes chemicals are our friends.
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  6. #6
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    feeding your pets garlic in any form keeps the fleas off them, I don't know about orange oils.
    The real art of conversation is not only saying the right thing at the right moment but also to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the most tempting moment. -- unknown

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    When I was a kid, we used to put orange & lemon peels in the dog kennel. You have to change them regularly but we didn't seem to have the flea problems others had. Making the essence & washing their blankets etc in it should help as well.

    IIRC, the flea cycle is 2 weeks, so if you were to spray orange essence mist over your carpets at slightly less than 2 week intervals you'd get the eggs - you need to spray whatever you use 3 times at about a 10 - 12 day interval. 1st gets the adults, 2nd gets the hatchlings & 3rd cleans up any that were off-cycle.

    I've also used flea powder (wear a mask & dust it everywhere there is carpet) then vacuumed it up a few hours later - again 3 times at intervals. Oh, of course you do your pets at the same time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrissy View Post
    feeding your pets garlic in any form keeps the fleas off them, I don't know about orange oils.
    Garlic is listed as potentially fatal to dogs, like onions it can cause anemia.

    Just because we can eat it doesn't mean they can.
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    Well it was ugly but I got two dogs down and soaked them. Who knew a ten pound dog could be so tough? I'll attack the other two tomorrow.

    Does anyone else have a hard time fighting fleas?

    The cats aren't so bad. But the dogs - sheesh.

  10. #10
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    Garlic is rfed to Horses, it keeps the flies away. Household Calvery Summer Feed Pellets contain Garlic. Royal Horse Artillery and Guards Officer Mount Pellets don't, they are fed a seperate Garlic Supplement.
    (For a modern Hi Tech force the British Army still has a heck of a lot of Horses)
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  11. #11
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    You have to attack all of the animals and house at the same time. You can't wait to do the other one tomorrow. We (the pets) had fleas many years ago. we used the sprays and washed the dogs twice a week. Along with the flea collars. Those chemicals are a small price to pay for watching tv without the odd flea jumping on you. Once the animals and house were flea free for a month we took the collars off.

  12. #12
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    Yes, I had a nightmare of a time at our other house. Anyone I talked to had some weird concoction that didn't seem to work for me. I did learn to not use the same flea prevention products over and over because the fleas do become immune. Adams flea and tick shampoo had the most success and I love the way it smells. My solution? I moved, lol. That wasn't the reason I moved, it just happened that way.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tinaa View Post
    Well it was ugly but I got two dogs down and soaked them. Who knew a ten pound dog could be so tough? I'll attack the other two tomorrow.

    Does anyone else have a hard time fighting fleas?

    The cats aren't so bad. But the dogs - sheesh.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravens_cry View Post
    Well, you could always test it out. Get a microscope, a kids model should be good, get some orange oil, and get some fleas. To stop the fleas from jumping around, stick them to some tape. Get an eye dropper and put it on the fleas while looking through the microscope. See what happens. Unfortunatly, cats, if you have cats, really don't like the smell of orange oil and citris themselves.
    are you crazy? PETA (People Eating Tasty Animals) will be all over you.

    so cruel.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acolyte View Post
    I've also used flea powder (wear a mask & dust it everywhere there is carpet) then vacuumed it up a few hours later - again 3 times at intervals. Oh, of course you do your pets at the same time.
    Permethrin should NOT be used with cats, either in the collar, bug-bombed, fumigated, as a powder, or as a bath.

    From Wikipedia's entry on permethrin: "Permethrin is toxic to cats and many cats die each year after being given flea treatments intended for dogs, or by contact with dogs who have recently been treated with permethrin." The medical condition is known as "feline permethrin toxicosis."

    My uncle is a vet, and he concurs.

    It's also extremely toxic to fish, so if you have fish, you may want to adopt a different approach.

  15. #15
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    PS: According to Heinein, the best way to kill pests of all kinds is simply to depressurize the holds to vacuum and hold it there a day or so. Knocks 'em dead every time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mugaliens View Post
    Permethrin should NOT be used with cats, either in the collar, bug-bombed, fumigated, as a powder, or as a bath.

    From Wikipedia's entry on permethrin: "Permethrin is toxic to cats and many cats die each year after being given flea treatments intended for dogs, or by contact with dogs who have recently been treated with permethrin." The medical condition is known as "feline permethrin toxicosis."

    My uncle is a vet, and he concurs.

    It's also extremely toxic to fish, so if you have fish, you may want to adopt a different approach.
    *grins* Now I've picked myself up off the floor after wondering how long you spent trying to put those dog-sized collars on those tiny little fishies...

    Not sure if we had Permethrin based treatments - we used stuff that had 'safe for cats and dogs' on the label. Never lost a cat yet.

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