Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Double Slit Experiment

  1. #1

    Question Double Slit Experiment

    Hello, thank you ahead of time to anyone who reads and comments. I love these boards, but I have never posted before.

    I read this on wikipedia:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-slit_experiment
    “Returning again to electrons, when electrons are fired one at a time through a double-slit apparatus they do not cluster around two single points directly on lines between the emitter and the two slits, but instead one by one they fill in the same old interference pattern with which we have now become quite familiar.”

    The electrons fired in this experiment travel at the speed of light correct?

    Isn’t it correct that anything traveling the speed of light does not experience time?

    We experience time, so the electrons appear to us to be firing one at a time.

    What if electrons fired one at a “time” do not experience time; therefore they behave as if fired all at once?

    Please, be gentle

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,416
    Welcome to the BAUT forum.


    Quote Originally Posted by hernari View Post
    The electrons fired in this experiment travel at the speed of light correct?
    No, the electrons do not move at the speed of light.

    However, the single-particle interference in a double-slit experiment has been observed with photons, which do move at the speed of light.

    Such experiments have been performed on all sorts of particles, from electrons and photons up to molecules.


    Quote Originally Posted by hernari View Post
    Isn’t it correct that anything traveling the speed of light does not experience time?

    We experience time, so the electrons appear to us to be firing one at a time.

    What if electrons fired one at a “time” do not experience time; therefore they behave as if fired all at once?
    This is all based on your assumption that the particles move at the speed of light.
    But since these experiments work as expected with particles that move at lower speeds, your idea does not work for them.

    As a matter of experimental fact, whether the particles move at the speed of light or not, does not affect the outcome of the experiment, because the single-particle interference is the consequence of the quantum nature of the particles.

    But, wouldn't your question be more appropriate to the Q&A forum...?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    11,562
    Quote Originally Posted by hernari View Post
    What if electrons fired one at a “time” do not experience time; therefore they behave as if fired all at once?

    Please, be gentle
    I see where you're going with this, but as papageno points out, electrons do not move at the speed of light. They have mass, so cannot.
    Quote Originally Posted by papageno View Post
    As a matter of experimental fact, whether the particles move at the speed of light or not, does not affect the outcome of the experiment, because the single-particle interference is the consequence of the quantum nature of the particles.
    Wouldn't that be a consequence of their wave nature?
    But, wouldn't your question be more appropriate to the Q&A forum...?
    It appears that the OP intended to draw an ATM conclusion.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,416
    Quote Originally Posted by hhEb09'1 View Post
    Wouldn't that be a consequence of their wave nature?
    Not entirely.
    The interesting feature of the experiment is that the quantum particles interact with the screen with particle-like properties (little dots appear one at a time), and only after a while the interference pattern becomes apparent.
    If you had just a wave going through the system, then the interference pattern would be observed from the beginning.

    This experiment shows very nicely the quantum nature of the particles, because you get both the particle-like and the wave-like behavior.





    [Would I be right in thinking that this is my kilopi post...?]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    14,315
    I agree that it's a function of their wave nature. Electrons have a very strong kinship with photons. After all, it's the excited electron which emits a photon when it moves from it's excited orbital to it's base orbital. It's only natural that they might share some properties.

    I wasn't aware, however, that electons exhibited the same properties with the dual-slit experiment as did photons (color me ignorant). Can anyone verify that this is indeed the case?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    11,562
    Quote Originally Posted by papageno View Post
    Not entirely.
    The interesting feature of the experiment is that the quantum particles interact with the screen with particle-like properties (little dots appear one at a time), and only after a while the interference pattern becomes apparent.
    O I agree that that is definitely the most interesting part of the experiment!

    I was just commenting on "the single-particle interference is the consequence of the quantum nature of the particles"
    [Would I be right in thinking that this is my kilopi post...?]
    Next post! The first instance of kilopi on BABB/BAUT, in a post of ToSeek.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,416
    Quote Originally Posted by mugaliens
    I agree that it's a function of their wave nature. Electrons have a very strong kinship with photons. After all, it's the excited electron which emits a photon when it moves from it's excited orbital to it's base orbital. It's only natural that they might share some properties.
    It has nothing to do with the fact that electrons and photons interact. It has to do with the fact that both photons and electrons are quantum particles, and as such their state is mathematically a wave-function.


    Quote Originally Posted by mugaliens
    I wasn't aware, however, that electons exhibited the same properties with the dual-slit experiment as did photons (color me ignorant). Can anyone verify that this is indeed the case?
    You have never seen the cheesy 70s educational movie: single electron interference ?

    These experiments have been done with a lot of different type of particles, up to atoms and molecules, and in different media (such as semiconductors).



    Quote Originally Posted by hhEb09'1
    I was just commenting on "the single-particle interference is the consequence of the quantum nature of the particles"
    Ah, I see what you mean.




    [So... this must be my kilopi post, right?]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    11,562
    Quote Originally Posted by papageno View Post
    [So... this must be my kilopi post, right?]
    Fireworks!

Similar Threads

  1. Double slit experiment
    By kamaz in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 2011-Sep-13, 07:20 PM
  2. Double Slit Experiment
    By Terry Giblin in forum Against the Mainstream
    Replies: 178
    Last Post: 2009-Nov-01, 12:34 AM
  3. Double Slit Experiment
    By NovaJoe in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 2009-Jan-16, 06:35 AM
  4. Double Slit Experiment Utilizing Double Sources of Light
    By a1call in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 2008-Oct-12, 05:04 PM
  5. Double slit experiment
    By afterburner in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 2006-Jul-16, 10:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
here
The forum is sponsored in-part by: