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Thread: Do microscopic dimensions expand with the expansion of space?

  1. #1
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    Do microscopic dimensions expand with the expansion of space?

    Do microscopic dimensions expand with the expansion of space?

    Mister Earl brought this up in another thread and I thought that it would be a good thread of its own.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tommac View Post
    Do microscopic dimensions expand with the expansion of space?

    Mister Earl brought this up in another thread and I thought that it would be a good thread of its own.
    Here...Another thread.

    Did you even attempt a search for the answer? I have not yet seen evidence that you did any of your own research because your questions are only in reference to your other threads.

    Yes; this sounds a little snippy and personal... but this applies to anybody trying to learn something. Dig around, try to put 2 and 2 together.

  3. #3
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    We have already discussed this very extensively in the last month or so,
    including in several threads that you started.

    If the observed expansion of the Universe is purely ballistic, then there
    is no reason to hypothesize any kind of expanding space other than as
    a convenient reference frame for discussion of cosmological distances.
    Tens of millions of light-years or more.

    If the observed expansion of the Universe is accelerating, then there
    may or may not be some kind of force pervading all of space which tends
    to produce expansion. If that force has constant strength, it is so
    extremely miniscule that it could never be detected on the scale of a
    cluster of galaxies or smaller.

    If such a force exists and is gaining in strength, it might become
    detectable in laboratory experiments several billion years from now.
    Even then, it would probably not have any detectable effect on the
    size of atoms or other particles held together by electromagnetic
    and nuclear forces.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis
    http://www.FreeMars.org/jeff/

    "I find astronomy very interesting, but I wouldn't if I thought we
    were just going to sit here and look." -- "Van Rijn"

    "The other planets? Well, they just happen to be there, but the
    point of rockets is to explore them!" -- Kai Yeves

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    That thread had nothing to do with my question.


    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Here...Another thread.

    Did you even attempt a search for the answer? I have not yet seen evidence that you did any of your own research because your questions are only in reference to your other threads.

    Yes; this sounds a little snippy and personal... but this applies to anybody trying to learn something. Dig around, try to put 2 and 2 together.

  5. #5
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    Let's say that everywhere in the universe there are 10 spacial dimensions ...
    7 of which are tiny. Does that mean that the tiny dimensions are always tiny? Or does their space expand also? I am not talking about the space between atoms ... I am talking about a tiny dimension.

    Lets say we have one dimension that is one plank length and loops back on itself. If an area of space was not bound by gravity would this small dimensional loop also expand? Could our current space-time have started out as small microscopic dimensions themselves?

    If these other dimensions exist now could they eventually expand into large dimensions?



    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    We have already discussed this very extensively in the last month or so,
    including in several threads that you started.

    If the observed expansion of the Universe is purely ballistic, then there
    is no reason to hypothesize any kind of expanding space other than as
    a convenient reference frame for discussion of cosmological distances.
    Tens of millions of light-years or more.

    If the observed expansion of the Universe is accelerating, then there
    may or may not be some kind of force pervading all of space which tends
    to produce expansion. If that force has constant strength, it is so
    extremely miniscule that it could never be detected on the scale of a
    cluster of galaxies or smaller.

    If such a force exists and is gaining in strength, it might become
    detectable in laboratory experiments several billion years from now.
    Even then, it would probably not have any detectable effect on the
    size of atoms or other particles held together by electromagnetic
    and nuclear forces.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis

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    Quote Originally Posted by tommac View Post
    That thread had nothing to do with my question.
    Why not? What is your interpretation, and why do you think it doesn't apply?

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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Why not? What is your interpretation, and why do you think it doesn't apply?
    Well I am not sure if applies or not that is why I am asking.

    If it is true there would be some interesting things ... like ... what if only these small dimensions are expanding ... then the redshift we se could be caused only by the expansion upon the expansion from these extra dimensions.

    Everything could be getting further away just from the expansion of a single dimension from microscopic to a signifigantly large dimension ( as long as the angle through this extra dimension was correct )

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    Quote Originally Posted by tommac View Post
    Well I am not sure if applies or not that is why I am asking...
    No, you stated it didn't, you didn't express any doubt.

    I, for one, can not see how a subatomic dimension change can effect empty space or not affect unchanging matter.

  9. #9
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    Tommac; Jeff answered your question.

    The answer is NO.

    If that is not good enough for you consider this...

    Gravity is described as a weak force. The truth might be its not a force at all. Its an effect of spacial distortions.
    Expansion of, and accelerating expansion of the universe is a weaker than that force... as we have learned that gravitationally bound objects are NOT said to be expanding... why is it that you can ask the same question so often?
    Now on a micro or atomic scale are things expanding. Information of the answer is not yet determined. We are working on this as we speak. If you are asking me? I answer NO.
    Those same particle accelerators mentioned elsewhere in these forums are expected to offer up the answer to this question as well. We expect a great deal from this quest for detection of expansion. Super conductors, extreme lac of heat, very sensative... Oh hell tommac, go toss a dice. We do not know the answer yet. Mark

  10. #10
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    I'm surprised that so much impatience is being expressed at tommac's daring to ask what appears to be a simple question. I'll try to answer it.

    He asked: Do microscopic dimensions expand with the expansion of space?

    As far I am aware, microscopic dimensions arise only in string theory, and I know of no reason for associating string theory with cosmology. Cosmology says nothing about microscopic dimensions, only to matters dealing with the Universe as a whole.. Objects even as small as galaxies are regarded as individually unaffected by the universal expansion, so I'd be very surprised if anyone were to seriously suggest that anything as small as microscopic dimensions would be affected by the expansion of space. Hence, I'd say that the answer to tommac's question is "No".

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