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Thread: Why do English muffins take so long to toast?

  1. #1
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    Why do English muffins take so long to toast?

    Why do English muffins take so long to toast to the same degree of crispness, compared to other breads?

    I always have to double-toast EMs, whereas everything else, from Texas toast to Crimean bagels, toasts fine on a single pass.

    Anyone else notice? Any theories?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Wilson View Post
    Why do English muffins take so long to toast to the same degree of crispness, compared to other breads?
    Anyone else notice? Any theories?
    All those nooks and crannies helps insulate itself, added to the fact that the bread is denser ?

  3. #3
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    They have more mass, and more moisture.
    I usually grill them on a circulon pan ( has circular ridges ) and put an
    1 1/2 " wooden press on top. Big enough to cover 4 halves of english muffin.
    Butter the area first, heat...about 5 on a 10 scale.
    Of course, the toaster lends a different affect, given time.
    Dan
    Last edited by danscope; 2007-Jun-20 at 05:36 PM. Reason: typo

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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    Big enough to cover 4 halves of englich muffin.
    Stacked?
    200% ?

    I couldn't resist, especially with the mis-spelling.

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    I think they are coated with some of Chevy Chase's food varnish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    Stacked?
    200% ?

    I couldn't resist, especially with the mis-spelling.
    Hi, yep, you caught that!
    I don't stack them, they get split and are grilled in a cluster.
    It's just Celine and I enjoying them, so two muffins are adequate.
    Now, of course, they may get some marmaled or cream cheese, or occasionally the Boysenberry. I'd prefer the boysenberry more than any ordinary jam.
    I'm a " Citizens for boysenberry jam" fan!
    Dan

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    Wow, it's been quite awhile since I thought of "Punky's Dilemma".

    If I become a first lieutenant
    Would you put my photo on your piano?


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    As an Englishman, can i ask, what the heck is an English Muffin?
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    Re: Why do English muffins take so long to toast?


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    So, it's some kind of bread roll?
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  11. #11
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    From here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_muffin

    An English muffin (UK: (breakfast) muffin) is a round, yeast-leavened bread enriched with butter and milk, often served at breakfast in the UK, USA and Canada.

    It occurs to me that I've never seen anyone eat an English muffin and French fries at the same time. And an English muffin and French toast would just be redundant.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    It occurs to me that I've never seen anyone eat an English muffin and French fries at the same time. And an English muffin and French toast would just be redundant.
    Only if they were baked in a dutch oven.
    I'm a cynical optimist. I think the only way out is through, but once we get through it'll be better. Very different, but better. Howard Tayler

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donnie B. View Post
    Wow, it's been quite awhile since I thought of "Punky's Dilemma".

    If I become a first lieutenant
    Would you put my photo on your piano?

    "To Maryjane, Best wishes, Martin."
    Old Roger, draft dodger, bangin down the basement door.
    Everybody knows what he's tipy toeing down there for.

  14. #14
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    I'd guess it's a cross between moisture, density, and surface area. Nooks and crannies, remember?
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    I don't really care why they take longer to toast -- they're quite yummy (with Boysenberry jam!) when done. What I really want to know is why the makers don't either split them--all the way-- or not at all. It's really annoying to have a "split" English muffin and have to use a knife anyhow. Same goes for bagels, of course.

    This is a topic for my "When I'm King of the World" thread, which I'll start someday!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    As an Englishman, can i ask, what the heck is an English Muffin?
    Hello Chap,
    These delightful confections are widely enjoyed on these far shores and make an excellent crumpet to slather with appropriate preserves and butter.
    To answer your question: these muffins have a medium density, are about 3 to 4 inches in diameter, and should be from 3/4" to an inch in thickness. They are sliced in half, and then placed into an electric toaster( the general method) or grilled at medium heat on a buttered pan, cast iron is good. Check their progress for a nice golden brown. I suggest marmalade as an excellent option for topping.
    We also make mock pizza out of them, employing some Italian tomato sauce, some cheese and a slice of meat. This is assembled and placed on a bake sheet into a
    moderate oven for 5 minutes or so. Not half bad. The bachelor's appetizer.
    Here is one....just one recipe for English Muffins :
    *********************************
    1 lb all-purpose flour or bread flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 1/2 teaspoons dry yeast
    1 teaspoon sugar
    1 cup warm milk
    2 ounces butter, melted



    1. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl and leave in a warm place.
    2. Dissolve the yeast and sugar in warm milk.
    3. Let froth, then mix in the butter.
    4. Stir all the liquid into the warm flour and beat well until smooth and elastic.
    5. Cover and proof in a warm place for 50 minutes or until doubled in bulk.
    6. Turn onto a well-floured board and knead, working a little more flour if necessary to make the dough easier to shape.
    7. Round up the dough, roll into a thick sausage shape and slice into 8 to 10 portions, each about 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 inch thick.
    8. Shape each one into a round with straight sides.
    9. Put onto a greased baking sheet.
    10. Cover (use greased plastic wrap) and put in a warm place to proof for 30-40 minutes or until springy to the touch.
    11. Leave room for expansion and be careful not to over-proof, as the muffins will get flabby and lose their shape.
    12. Warm and grease the bakestone lightly.
    13. Lift the muffins carefully onto the bakestone and cook over very moderate heat (about 350-degrees) for 8-10 minutes until pale gold underneath.
    14. Turn and cook the other side.
    15. Wrap in a cloth and keep warm if cooking in batches.
    16. To serve, insert a knife in the side, pull the top and bottom slightly apart, and insert slivers of butter.
    **********************
    And you will find an excellent recipe in Julia Child's great book....
    Baking with Julia . Her recipe employs instant (powdered milk) for some specific reason.
    These delightfull muffins are worth the trouble. Of course, you can buy a
    dozen of them for $1.39 in the super market, 99p on sale.
    One of life's small pleasures.
    Best regards, Dan

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Wilson View Post
    Why do English muffins take so long to toast to the same degree of crispness, compared to other breads?
    Because Lucas makes their toasters.

  18. #18
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    Loaves of bread and other, smaller bread products like English muffins, regular muffins, biscuits, English biscuits (called "cookies" in the USA"), and such tend to have lots of holes on the inside but a much smoother, less porous outer surface. That makes it hard for air or light/IR radiation to get in and out unless and until it's sliced, but then slicing it creates a new surface or two with all of those big (and little) interior openings now exposed. That gives a sliced bread object many more places for heat to get in in the forms of both light/IR radiation and hot air, and also more places for moisture to get out. Slices of bread from a loaf are toasted with sliced surfaces exposed on two sides; English muffins are essentially halves of a tiny "loaf" and toasted with no more than one sliced surface exposed.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Figaro View Post
    Because Lucas makes their toasters.
    Are they still in business? The only experience I have with Lucas electrical systems is on old Brit motorcycles - awful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tucson_Tim View Post
    Are they still in business? The only experience I have with Lucas electrical systems is on old Brit motorcycles - awful.
    I don't know. The original joke is about refrigerators, and the setup line is, why do the English drink warm beer?

  21. #21
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    Lucas was known as the 'prince of darkness' because of their crummy electrical products.

    As for beer we don't drink Warm Beer and never have.

    traditional 'Ale' is served at Cellar temp which ashould be between 53 and 56°F. It's a living thing, any cooler or warmer spoils it's condition. pasteurised Ales and lagers are served chilled, usualy to hide their lack of any real flavour.

    'Extra Cold' is getting popular now, it goes through the chiller twice, In my local the 'Tap and Spile' in Guisborough Guinness, Carling Black Label Lager and Fosters lager are served Extra cold.

    All the 'real Ales' are at Cellar temp which never varies by more than a degree.

    One of the hand pumps goes through the Chiller, a hangover from the days it had 'John Smiths Extra Smooth' A horrible bland brew aimed at Lager drinkers. This pump is now used for Caledonian IPA, Tim Taylors Landlord or Durham Magus. All three of which are pale, Hp rich beers and they suit an extra chill.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain swoop View Post
    All the 'real Ales' are at Cellar temp which never varies by more than a degree.
    Yeah. I hate it when my Budweiser is off a degree.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    From here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_muffin

    An English muffin (UK: (breakfast) muffin) is a round, yeast-leavened bread enriched with butter and milk, often served at breakfast in the UK, USA and Canada.

    Here's how English they are - I thought they were just an American thing. I've never seen anyone here in the UK eat those. I saw the title of this thread and was about to ask the question 'Being English, can I ask when an English Muffin is?' - but someone was kind enough to ask already

    Doug

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    Right... and don't ask for French fries in France, either.

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    We call 'Fries' Chips.

    What the US call Chips we call Crisps
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    try Asda and places like that, they are always after shelf fillers n such
    not much but it's cash.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donnie B. View Post
    Right... and don't ask for French fries in France, either.
    'pommes frites' - or something like that.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    It occurs to me that I've never seen anyone eat an English muffin and French fries at the same time.
    It would make a yummy chip butty.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    ...[English muffins] are widely enjoyed on these far shores and make an excellent crumpet...
    Ha! After tasting freshly baked crumpets for the 1st time at a crumpet shop run by an English couple just outside Golden Gate Park [9th & Irving Streets] in San Francisco a few years back, I say EMs can only wish they were crumpets, and is probably how/why they were so mis-named.

  30. #30
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    Muffins are NOT Crumpets. A fresh crumpet hot toasted with molten butter is the most divine thing for brekky. next to Sausage, Egg, bacon, Black Pudding. Baked Beans, Hash Browns, Mushrooms and a cup of tea followed by toast and Marmalade and more tea. (Full English) as it is known
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