Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 32

Thread: K-Pax

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    11,516
    The movie K-Pax comes out this weekend, and I am hoping to see it and get a review up quickly.

    P.S. This is a test post of the software too. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    145
    Have you seen that new "Superman" show? While I was in Texas, I happened to catch a few minutes of it. Hey, I have teen-aged nieces, leave me alone. Anyway, why was the lad using a telescope in a nice, bright room? I guess I'm nit-picking here, but I have to wait a few seconds for my eyes to re-adjust if I even light a cigarette. Yet this kid can stargaze out his bedroom window with all the lights on. Maybe he has a better scope than I do. He is, after all, a superhero.
    Lisa

  3. #3
    On 2001-10-22 15:28, Lisa wrote:
    He is, after all, a superhero.
    I would just swear that Superman has some sort of superbinocular vision that would be better than any little scope - or that would augment a little scope to Hubble-levels.

    At any rate, his ability to see faint points of light probably doesn't diminish when he's in a bright room.

    Paul "man of kleenex" Unwin

  4. #4
    On 2001-10-22 15:28, Lisa wrote:
    Have you seen that new "Superman" show? While I was in Texas, I happened to catch a few minutes of it. Hey, I have teen-aged nieces, leave me alone. Anyway, why was the lad using a telescope in a nice, bright room? I guess I'm nit-picking here, but I have to wait a few seconds for my eyes to re-adjust if I even light a cigarette. Yet this kid can stargaze out his bedroom window with all the lights on. Maybe he has a better scope than I do. He is, after all, a superhero.
    Lisa
    Well, haven't seen show, but was he doing it as Clark Kent? That would be logical (lol!, well you know what I mean) since he is only using telescope to fool the rubes. Superman don't need no stinking telescope, he has supervision! Or he did when I was a kid [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    (P-)>

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    621
    Well, this series is about Clark discovering who he is and his powers. From what I understand, he has not yet figured out how to use his x-ray vision. I have read that will be dealt with in a future episode [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    Rob

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    2,138
    On 2001-10-22 14:11, The Bad Astronomer wrote:
    The movie K-Pax comes out this weekend, and I am hoping to see it and get a review up quickly.

    P.S. This is a test post of the software too. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif[/img]
    Chip testing toe in the waters here - - - hmmmm, luke warm, nice.

    I'm getting hooked on "Farscape". Talk about Bad Astronomy! (Ok I like the girls who seem to be in assorted colors, as people are in reality here on Earth, except for blue!) One episode had three beings hanging on outside a ship, but two managed to survive and get pulled back in because air was rushing out around the hatch, so they were in the breeze and not exposed to raw vacuum. Possible?

    Chip

    This is also a test to see how an earlier post is answered. Right after, or at the end of the line alla SFN's BB. (-;

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,275
    On 2001-10-22 16:21, Chip wrote:

    I'm getting hooked on "Farscape". Talk about Bad Astronomy! (Ok I like the girls who seem to be in assorted colors, as people are in reality here on Earth, except for blue!) One episode had three beings hanging on outside a ship, but two managed to survive and get pulled back in because air was rushing out around the hatch, so they were in the breeze and not exposed to raw vacuum. Possible?
    There's a whole thread on this on the old BABB right now. It's interesting, and covers the territory pretty well. If the "beings" are smilar to us in physiology, they could probably survive for 30 seconds or so (even in total vaccuum, never mind the "breeze") without many ill-effects, except possibly sunburn, and the weird sensation of having the saliva boil off your tongue.

    One comment people often make is that "you shouldn't try to hold your breath", but I'd argue that would be next to impossible anyway... I don't think the glottis and lips are strong enough to resist a full atmosphere of pressure differential.

    OK, let's see if my quote-editing was successful... [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif[/img]

    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Donnie B. on 2001-10-22 16:57 ]</font>

  8. #8
    On 2001-10-22 16:56, Donnie B. wrote:

    One comment people often make is that "you shouldn't try to hold your breath", but I'd argue that would be next to impossible anyway... I don't think the glottis and lips are strong enough to resist a full atmosphere of pressure differential.
    Um, actually, I seem to recall from my foray into the realm of NASA's test results on blowing up dogs, that leaving your mouth closed would be a serious issue.

    The problem is that there is scarcely enough area to let the air out of your system without popping a lung, and impeding it at all would most likely push you over the edge, so small is the margin between bursting your lungs and not. The key factor being the maximum pressure exerted on your lungs, anything you do which makes the spike more severe is very dangerous.

    Ben Benoy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,275
    Well, I don't really understand the mechanism... I suppose if the air doesn't go out the mouth, the alveoli expand and burst or something. But in any case, I don't have any plans for a test of the theory any time soon. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    845
    I don't think K-Pax is about astronomy, but what the hey! There's always a good reaso to go see Kevin Spacey as a mental patient pretending to be from another planet and wearing red sunglasses!

    Plus Kevin Spacey's always good. I think.

  11. #11
    I understood K-Pax is meant to be a planet that the star of the show came from. That makes it an astronomy film ! [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif[/img]

    By the way, looks like Phil has got a smiley feature to help us emote !!

    [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif[/img] [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_cool.gif[/img] ;-(

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,283
    On 2001-10-22 15:28, Lisa wrote:
    Have you seen that new "Superman" show?
    Hmmm... this might go into the "Bad Storytelling" heading.

    O.K. in the show, Clark Knows he is super strong, invulnerable and super fast. And yet, he never once clues in that he's not from 'around there'? For that matter, when George discovered his little boy ended up being faster than a speeding bullet and more powerful than a locomotive, why did he wait until he was in high school to mention that he knew why Clark was diffrent. <sigh> It just doesn't track.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    165
    Phil-

    I say you should definetly<sp?> check out at least K-Pax. I remember from the commercials so far that they mention light years as a distance. Also, that K-Pax is about a thousand light years away. Bad Astronomy? Don't know. Only one way to find out.

  14. #14
    On 2001-10-22 19:10, Ben Benoy wrote:

    Um, actually, I seem to recall from my foray into the realm of NASA's test results on blowing up dogs, that leaving your mouth closed would be a serious issue.
    NASA didn't blow up dogs in that way... did they? Why? That's pretty weird...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,468
    James, light years are distances. It is the distance light travels in one year (i.e. the distance traveled during one year at c).
    ------
    The poster formerly known as Keith.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    328
    'Coming Attractions' by Corona has a couple of spoiler-free previews of 'K-Pax' on their page at http://www.corona.bc.ca/films/details/kpax.html (sorry, don't know enough HTML to make this a link). One previewer mentions that one of his? favourite scenes involves the Hayden Planetarium, so I'll expect you to grab onto that one, anyway!

    Also, re the new Board, how do you access the smilies? I rarely use them, but it might be nice to know where they are hiding.

    The (paxing my time at work) Curtmudgeon

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    3,020
    As you've probably just discovered, providing the full url is enough to make it a link here (providing you dont disable BBcode) & smilies are done in the usual way.. the board software converts (some of) them automatically into graphics. Check out the FAQ for more info [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif[/img]

  18. #18
    On 2001-10-23 08:29, Timm wrote:
    On 2001-10-22 19:10, Ben Benoy wrote:

    Um, actually, I seem to recall from my foray into the realm of NASA's test results on blowing up dogs, that leaving your mouth closed would be a serious issue.
    NASA didn't blow up dogs in that way... did they? Why? That's pretty weird...
    Well, they sort of did. Many animals were killed in their name, if not under their direction (I'm not sure who did the actual testing) trying to determine how long a human would survive after explosive docompression. So yes, they did kill dogs getting statistics on what kind of pressure drops would incapacitate them etc, and then tried to extrapolate to humans. It worked out that if you were lucky, you could probably live for 90 seconds. But may be not. Nobody ever volunteered to be the guinea pig. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    Technically, they didn't really blow up the dogs, either. But it was such a nice metaphor. Sigh.

    Ben Benoy

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    165
    On 2001-10-23 10:26, Irishman wrote:
    James, light years are distances. It is the distance light travels in one year (i.e. the distance traveled during one year at c).
    Yes, I know that, Irishman. I was just pointing it out as a bit of good astronomy. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]

  20. #20

    One comment people often make is that "you shouldn't try to hold your breath", but I'd argue that would be next to impossible anyway... I don't think the glottis and lips are strong enough to resist a full atmosphere of pressure differential.

    Going from normal atmosphere to vacuum would be like coming up from scuba diving. At 32-33 feet deep you are at one atmoshere of pressure.

    I know from experience you can't come up from even 8 feet underwater without exhaling, the air in your lungs starts expanding painfully. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif[/img]

    Love the smilies [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]


  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,275
    On 2001-10-24 07:49, hullaballo wrote:
    Going from normal atmosphere to vacuum would be like coming up from scuba diving. At 32-33 feet deep you are at one atmoshere of pressure.

    I know from experience you can't come up from even 8 feet underwater without exhaling, the air in your lungs starts expanding painfully. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif[/img]
    Okay, so I guess we all agree -- Dave Bowman made a big mistake by trying to hold his breath when he blew the pod hatch.

    But how about this...

    It sure was lucky that the pod hatch blew off to the side, rather than straight into the airlock. After all, it might have damaged the door or its seals, or even gotten lodged there and blocked Dave's entry. Can you say "Uh-oh"? I guess not... in vaccuum! [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif[/img]

    I suppose we can assume that the hatch was designed so that one side blew off before the other, thereby torquing it to the side, for just such an occasion. But I bet it wouldn't be too hard to come up with scenarios where that would be the *last* thing you'd want the hatch to do. Newton's laws, and all that... you'd impart a spin to the pod... nasty.

    Still, it was an impressive scene for its time, and very scary. I can remember holding my breath, and only starting to breathe again as the lock filled with air...


  22. #22
    On 2001-10-24 12:55, Donnie B. wrote:

    Okay, so I guess we all agree -- Dave Bowman made a big mistake by trying to hold his breath when he blew the pod hatch.

    But how about this...

    It sure was lucky that the pod hatch blew off to the side, rather than straight into the airlock. After all, it might have damaged the door or its seals, or even gotten lodged there and blocked Dave's entry. Can you say "Uh-oh"? I guess not... in vaccuum! [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif[/img]

    I suppose we can assume that the hatch was designed so that one side blew off before the other, thereby torquing it to the side, for just such an occasion. But I bet it wouldn't be too hard to come up with scenarios where that would be the *last* thing you'd want the hatch to do. Newton's laws, and all that... you'd impart a spin to the pod... nasty.

    Still, it was an impressive scene for its time, and very scary. I can remember holding my breath, and only starting to breathe again as the lock filled with air...
    Yes, there's also one thing that's always bugged me about that scene: he could see! When the eye is exposed to a vacuum, it expands, and the moisture on the surface boils off. The surface of the eye becomes completely opaque and what little light does go through cannot be focused at all.

    Dave would have been blind as a bat. Yet he managed to find and trigger the switch to close the hatch and repressurize the airlock. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif[/img]

  23. #23
    Dave would have been blind as a bat. Yet he managed to find and trigger the switch to close the hatch and repressurize the airlock. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif[/img]
    No doubt part of his training included finding his way around the ship in the dark and in a hurry.

  24. #24
    On 2001-10-24 07:49, hullaballo wrote:

    One comment people often make is that "you shouldn't try to hold your breath", but I'd argue that would be next to impossible anyway... I don't think the glottis and lips are strong enough to resist a full atmosphere of pressure differential.
    It's not a question of whether you could hold your breath, you couldn't, but doing anything (like closing your mouth) which impedes the air rushing out of your lungs causes the pressure to spike higher, which makes you dead.

    Ben Benoy

  25. #25
    About 30 years ago, there was a book called "The 50 Minute Hour". Don't remember the author's name, but he was a practicing psychiatrist living in Baltimore. The book contained three case histories. The last one was about a guy like Kevin Spacey's character. The doctor decided that the cure was to jolly the patient along and get into the space travel thing with him. But, the doctor got caught up in the details (a frustrated quasi-astronomer, he) and it took a while for him to step back and see what was happening. I recommend the book, but will try to get the author's name. I'm sure its out-of-print, but might be available at specialty shops.

  26. #26
    My post of 2001-10-24 21:03

    The author's name was Robert Lindner. The book was published in 1982 and a newsp[rint (paper back) is currently available.

    I wonder if the producers of K-PAX got the idea from that book.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    18
    I went and saw K-PAX Saturday afternoon. Phil, there is a lot of astronomical dialog in it and it goes pretty fast, so you got your work cut out for you. I think that some of it was very accurate, but some of course was nonsensical. But in general I could tell that the consulting astrophysicist that they hired had some definite impact on the script.
    In addition the scene after the credits had run really captures the essence of our profession/hobby

    Matthew Ota
    Orange County Astronomers
    http://www.ocastronomers.org/
    Telescopes In Education (TIE)
    http://tie.jpl.nasa.gov


    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Matthew Ota on 2001-10-28 14:48 ]</font>

    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Matthew Ota on 2001-10-31 00:31 ]</font>

  28. #28
    Yeah, I saw it this weekend as well. It seemed pretty good to me. There were a couple of references to Kevin Spacey's character's planet being "in Lyra" which of course offers quite a lot of volume to put a star in. [img]/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif[/img] But yeah, the "Astrophysicist" credit was pretty cool.

    Ben

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    11,516
    It doesn't look like I will get to see it until at least next weekend; events at home conspired against me this time (deadlines, deadlines). Monsters, Inc. comes out next weekend and I will almost certainly see that too. I'd better get cracking here.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    165
    At least you can enjoy Monsters, Inc. Don't think there'll be any BA in that movie.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
here
The forum is sponsored in-part by: