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Thread: Magnetic Fields To Affect Space Time

  1. #1
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    May 2004
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    In this article

    http://www.nature.com/nsu/nsu_pf/010614/010614-6.html

    It's stated that magnetic fields can counter effect the curvature of space.
    What applications do you think engineers of the future could use this for?
    Maybe un-curve space around a black hole?

  2. #2
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    Thanks Blackbox,

    Nice article, but before we think about what use we can find for this effect, I think theorists will have a go at this theory. It would mean that they forgot about a fundamental force and that won't go down smoothly I imagine. Let's find out what the rest of the scientific communion thinks first.

    Cheers.

  3. #3
    Guest Guest
    Well, don't forget the implications of magnetism possibly being antigrav. It would mean that magnetism would have geometric properties as well as energetic ones.

  4. #4
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    Thought provoking, indeed. This suggests that the early universe would not have expanded as fast as has been thought. This could explain why early galaxies appear more mature than expected. It also might play a major role in why matter tends to clump together in galaxies, clusters and superclusters, even as the universe has expanded right along.
    Even better, this article makes a prediction that will be easily tested by gravity wave detectors now being constructed. The proof will be in the mathematical modeling of this concept. It is still hard for me to believe, however, that noone has considered and rejected this line of thinking before. I suspect that it has been considered and rejected by many for good reason: magnetic effects simply are not strong enough or far-reaching enough to make a difference.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2004
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    Is there an upper limit to electromagnetic force?

    I was thinking first thing this morning about the 0G possibilities of magnetism.
    It seems like an area of physics that doesn't really get explored as much as others.

    If you had a unit in which you wished to transport heavy materials, could you not have a magnetised frame above it, fixed to the unit by a vertically sliding hinge. (will try to post diagram. Oh, for a stylus.... )
    Gradually increase an electrical current passing through the frame and another inverted polarity current through the unit, until the unit lifts from the ground, abolishing friction.
    Surely you can find the balance between the magnetic forces, thus making the unit "float" in mid-air?
    Might be useful for making repairs/alterations etc.

    I haven't really thought this through yet :unsure: , and have barely seperated it from the dream starring Alicia Keyes, but surely in theory it would work.

  6. #6
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    Maybe un-curve space around a black hole?
    Exactly!! And a contributing process for unravelling black holes.

    My mind is easily boggled by considerations requiring warping of spacetime so I still cling to distinguishing between "anti-gravity" and "opposition" to gravity. The former unwarps or counterwarps spacetime where the latter overwhelms gravity by "crossing" world lines i.e., working against the warps and weaves imposed by gravity. The expulsion of material from a star results from thermodynamic processes working to overwhelm gravity while leaving the gravitational warpage in place. I believe magnetic fields can work to overwhelm gravity without counterwarping spacetime.

  7. #7
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    This suggests that the early universe would not have expanded as fast as has been thought
    Although I am not the big bang's strongest supporter, let me offer a counterview. Magnetic fields have polarity which makes it inevitable that they are as likely to reinforce gravitational forces as they are to oppose them with net effects being much smaller than they would be if magnetism were monopolar as is gravity. During the early tiny fractions of a second when the universe was a quark-electron soup, few to no protons and neutrons, unknown quantities of neutrinos, and most energy manifested in photons, it seems reasonable to assume that very intensive magnetic fields were at play. Indeed such fields may be the very reason that, by chance, gravity's attempt, due to its extreme intensity at the time, to black hole the entire universe failed. No one seems to have a satisfactory explanation for how the universe avoided collapse even after the inflationary period when the size of the universe was on the order of the size of a sphere of one light year radius and probably with no angular momentum and a (arbitrarily guessing) density approaching several million kilograms per cubic angstrom--dense man! dense!

    Perhaps magnetism was the first Harbinger of Grace (HOG).

  8. #8
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    Perhaps I should dust off my physics textbook which has been gathering dust for over 10 years. If I recall correctly, the reason magnetism is discounted as a significant factor in cosmology is that its effects dwindle significantly with distance. The flip side of this thought, however is that it implies that it should have been much more significant in the earliest phases of the big bang. I have seen few if any publications addressing the possible ramifications of this. At an early phase of the big bang, subatomic particles would have been all that existed, and I am totally unaware of what magnetic properties, if any, they might have on a large scale at short distances.
    On a grander scale, I have seen attempts to use magnetic field effects on a large scale associated with objects capable of generating a large magnetic field such as pulsars and black holes. Magnetism (in the form of overlapping fields at the poles of these objects) may in fact be a fundamental force driving the polar jets often seen associated with a supermassive black hole. I forsee this as a big area to be mined for some interesting physics and some interesting cosmological offshoots in the near future.

  9. #9
    TeeJ Guest
    "If you had a unit in which you wished to transport heavy materials, could you not have a magnetised frame above it, fixed to the unit by a vertically sliding hinge. (will try to post diagram. Oh, for a stylus.... )
    Gradually increase an electrical current passing through the frame and another inverted polarity current through the unit, until the unit lifts from the ground, abolishing friction.
    Surely you can find the balance between the magnetic forces, thus making the unit "float" in mid-air?
    Might be useful for making repairs/alterations etc."

    Perhaps I'm just WAY off, but this might work in space.

    NOTE: All bodies have and generate polaric gravity.

    (The trick is to know what frequencey they are.)

    Adjusting the "UNIT's" polarity +/- equal to or grater than a certain body can produce the effects of idle, attraction, and repulsion.

    This has to be calculated carefully so as not to disrupt the body's own field.

    Time and I do not get along at all.

    Thanks for reading.

    TeeJ - The truth is EVERYWHERE.

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