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Thread: ** FAQs ** Resources On The Web

  1. #31
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    6

    Royal Observatory, Greenwich

    Greenwich Royal Observatory has an online beginners course.

  2. #32
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    Let's not forget the basics:

    http://www.lightandmatter.com/area1book1.html
    Clearest textbook I have seen to date and it's free for the downloading.

    This one, or Thompson's original version, can be had at little cost in used book shops:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/cus...views.start=11

    As an incorrigible tilter at windmills and kicker of sacred cows I am compelled to reccommend this text. On the other hand, it probably should be read in conjunction with a standard calculus textbook, many good ones of which are available from vendors of used books.

  3. #33
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    Mar 2006
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    Evaluating Web Resources

    I definitely appreciate the lists posted recently on the forum on web resources.

    For newbies just getting back into astronomy/related sciences and browsing online, does anyone have any suggestions on criteria these web resources should meet? How could someone know what is reliable from what is edited/spinned?

  4. 2006-May-02, 04:30 PM
    Reason
    Post has nothing to with thread and user is long gone

  5. #34
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    Oct 2005
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  6. #35
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    Amazing thread, this will keep me busy for months. Thanks very much.

  7. 2006-Oct-17, 08:48 PM
    Reason
    Single link in post is dead

  8. 2006-Nov-21, 02:30 PM
    Reason
    Single link in post is dead

  9. #36
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    Dec 2006
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    34

    Popular misconceptions

    I received this from the moderator of this forum, not a site, but both PDF-files are very to the point, with explanations accompanied by formulas to prove things and let you find out yourselves.

    Quote :
    "However, this paper, by Davis and Lineweaver, provides a good, succinct account of some popular misconceptions of modern cosmology.

    Davis and Lineweaver have also written a less technical account. It was published in the magazine Scientific American, in March 2005. However, you can get a (PDF) copy from Charles Lineweaver's webpage - click on the link to it (it's at the bottom of the webpage).

    If you don't understand anything in either, please just ask.

    I think that you should first understand the basics of the "Big Bang" theory, before trying to understand how Dark Energy fits into the concordance model

  10. #37
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    Mar 2004
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    Spaceman Spiff recently posted an article describing Caltech cosmologist Sean Carroll's Preposterous Universe site and its Cosmology Primer and FAQ pages.

    Current FAQ questions:

    What is the universe expanding into?
    Are distant galaxies moving faster than the speed of light? Wouldn't that violate relativity?
    Does the universe have a center?
    Could we detect the expansion of the universe by trying to measure the expansion of the solar system?
    Is the universe finite or infinite? Will it recollapse or expand forever?
    Is space flat or curved? I've heard both.
    Is energy conserved in an expanding universe?
    What is the difference between dark matter and dark energy?
    Will we ever be able to detect dark matter or dark energy directly?
    Isn't "dark energy" just like the older concept of the "ether"?
    How do you know that dark matter isn't just ordinary matter that we can't see?
    Could the inferred existence of dark matter and dark energy be due to a modified behavior of gravity?
    Is inflation testable?
    What came before the Big Bang?
    Is our universe the only one, or are there others?
    ===

    Just thought I'd add a link here to the Lineweaver "misconceptions" article mentioned above:
    Scientific American: Misconceptions about the Big Bang

    Baffled by the expansion of the universe? You're not alone. Even astronomers frequently get it wrong
    Version from Charles Lineweaver's site (PDF half-megabyte)

    Charles H Lineweaver publications
    Last edited by 01101001; 2008-Dec-05 at 01:33 AM.
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  11. #38
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    Nov 2006
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    This has become a daily favorite of mine:

    http://lpod.wikispaces.com/

    The Lunar Photo of the Day.

    (I didn't see this one listed, yet.)
    Last edited by Swift; 2010-Jun-19 at 03:15 AM. Reason: Updated with current link

  12. #39
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    I don't know if I posted this already but
    www.nasaspaceflight.com

  13. #40
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    Is SETI at home (?) still going, or is that ATM.

    Kidding.

    I didn't see it listed so it may not fit the criteria.

  14. #41
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    May 2007
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    I hope you'll consider the two sites in my signature line. Science news, daily sky charts, podcasts featuring interviews with scientists, blogs, great community ...

    Come on over!

  15. #42
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    I suspect this will be useful next time someone asks about how the moon moves, and looks: Lunar Phase Simulator (Flash animation)

    A product of the Nebraska Astronomy Applet Project, NAAP. The project appears to be ongoing, with more animations and exercise modules to come.

    Some current animations:



    Good stuff.
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  16. #43
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    Why didn't someone tell me this was available on the Web?

    Cliffs Notes: Astronomy

    Need help with your astronomy homework and tests? We have lots of articles for you. Just browse the list of topics below, or search for something specific within our astronomy articles.

    • A Brief History of Astronomy
    • The Science of Astronomy
    • Observing the Sky
    • The Solar System
    • Earth and its Moon
    • Other Planets of the Solar System
    • The Sun, a Representative Star
    • Observational Properties of Stars
    • The Hertzsprung‐Russell Diagram
    • The Structure of Stars
    • Formation and Evolution of Stars
    • Final End States of Stars
    • The Milky Way Galaxy
    • Galaxies
    • The Universe
    • Life in the Universe
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  17. #44
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    Seen on Planetary Society Weblog: Solar systems in motion:

    Solar Systems Visualizer (Flash)

    Zoom in and out on our system. Investigate a particular planet's system of moons. Do the same for other systems (with less detail, of course).

    It's part of the University of Maryland Astronomy Workshop, itself worth a visit.

    Astronomy Classroom
    Explore the Possibilities
    Solar System Calculators
    Solar System Viewers
    Working With Orbits
    Orbital Integrators
    Index of all Tools
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...

  18. #45
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    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by devilmech View Post
    If you know of a particularly good site on a subject that we haven't listed , or you have or know of a personal site that may not be listed on a search engine, feel free to bring it to our attention so we can add it, if appropriate.

    We would appreciate any feedback, good or bad, so we can update this list and try to make it more user friendly.

    Hopefully this will be something we can all benefit from

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    I'm loving the thread, but I'm wondering... is it okay also if we list good software we find that is very informative with pretty much foreseen quality information and methology behind it?

  19. #46
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    Aug 2008
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    posting

    I took a look at your site and recommend it to my visitors. I agree with you on the importance of becoming valuable in many different areas. I believe that it sustains any entrepreneur during challenges that inevitably occur.
    -----------------
    cecilia

  20. #47
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    May 2005
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    SETI@home

    Pinemarten inquired about SETI@home but didn't post a link.

    SETI@home is indeed still ongoing; it is now part of the BOINC Project, which includes several distributed computing projects, SETI@home being only one of them.

    The BOINC main page is here:

    http://boinc.berkeley.edu/

    The page listing BOINC projects is here:

    http://boinc.berkeley.edu/projects.php

  21. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by zephyr46 View Post
    An Atlas of the Universe has some great links
    New address: An Atlas of the Universe

    (The author hasn't posted lately; I'll email and ask for an update to the original.)
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  22. #49
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    Martindale's Calculators On-Line Center, Physics, Astrophysics, Astronomy and Astrobiology

    Calculators, Applets, Spreadsheets,
    and where Applicable includes: Courses, Manuals,
    Handbooks, Simulations, Animations, Videos, etc.

    Currently the Calculators On-Line Center contains
    over "23,785" Calculators & Spreadsheets,
    over "3,710" Courses, Lectures, Manuals, Handbooks,
    & "1,000's" of Movies, Videos, Simulations & Animations
    Martindale's site seems to be operated by an individual -- Jim Martindale -- who likes providing helpful references. One of many sections listed on the front page:

    Science Overview
    Time, Measurement
    Fundamental Particles
    Chemicals/Biochemical Databases
    Periodic Tables & Physics Databases
    Lab Manuals, Guidelines, MSDS
    Radiation, Radioactivity
    Climatology, Meteorology, Weather
    Geeky goodness. Mmm.

    For physics:

    Physics Center
    Examples: Fundamentals, 1st & 2nd Year
    Accelerators, Chaos, Electromagnetics
    Fields, Quantum Field Theory, Quantum Groups,
    ...Quantum Condensed Matter Field Theory, etc.
    Magnetics, Neutrons, Phy. of Music
    Atomic, Molecular & Optical, Geophysics
    High Energy, Mathematical, Nuclear, Plasma
    Solid State, Quantum Mechanics, Relativity
    Sports Physics, Statistical Mechanics
    Thermodynamics, Physics Databases
    Did someone say "astronomy"?

    Astronomy, Astrophysics
    & Astrobiology Center
    Examples: Picture of the Day, 1st-4th Year
    Asteroids/Comets, Earth, Extrasolar Planets
    Space Missions, Stars, Nebulae & Galaxies
    Space Weather, Solar Activity, Catalogues,
    Telescopes, Observatories & HST, Sky Charts
    0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ...

  23. #50
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    Nov 2005
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    www.liftport.com has a rather good FAQ and a very extensive archive of forum about the space elevator and related topics. Some of the details are likely wrong, but that likely is true of all sources of information.
    www.spacesolarpower.wordpress.com has a mostly correct forum about solar power satellites and related topics. Neil

  24. #51
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  25. #52
    Is there a post like this for podcasts? Just a thought, as my Ipod is brimming with loads of completely free content, both audio and video, related to space, astronomy and the sciences.

  26. #53
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    Mar 2004
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    From topic Links to all space exploration missions:

    Armchair Astronautics: Space Mission Links

    Because I'll probably never be able to find it in that topic when I need it. But I can find it here.
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  27. #54
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    "HOW to BECOME a GOOD THEORETICAL PHYSICIST" by Gerard 't Hooft

    http://www.phys.uu.nl/~thooft/theorist.html

    Good advice from a Nobel Laureate.

  28. #55
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    Not sure if this has been mentioned:

    Wayne Hu's excellent website on the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Fraser Cain, owner (with Phil Plait, the Bad Astronomer) of this website, also owns Universe Today. This site has an excellent Guide to Space section; however, it's best to use this by entering a key word (or phrase) into the search box, making sure "Universe Today Search" is selected.

  29. #56
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    The videos of Richard Feynman's lectures on quantum electrodynamics have been referenced a few times recently. These are pretty non-technical and a good introduction to how quantum theory explains the behavior of light.

  30. #57

    Online Astronomy Calculators - Magnitude and Kepler's 3rd Law

    Well, if I might "plug" my own website here, I have 2 magnitude calculators:
    http://www.1728.org/magntude.htm
    http://www.1728.org/magntudj.htm (this is a more advanced magnitude calculator)

    and two calculators for Kepler's Third Law:
    http://www.1728.org/kepler3.htm
    http://www.1728.org/kepler3a.htm (the more advanced calculator)
    Last edited by wolf1728; 2011-Jun-13 at 10:28 PM. Reason: 1728.com stolen from me in May 2011. I have to use 1728.org now.

  31. #58
    Hi

    I've listened to a great set of lectures from Ohio State University available as a podcast or mp3:

    Astronomy 141 - Life in the Universe
    Astronomy 161 - An Introduction to Solar System Astronomy
    Astronomy 162 - Introduction to Stars, Galaxies, & the Universe

    I also live the Slacker Astronomy Podcast! Awesome!

    This looong list will have me busy for a while!

    Thanks!

  32. 2011-Jan-04, 02:51 AM
    Reason
    This wasn't a listing of a resource, I'm not sure what it was about.

  33. #59
    For relativistic physics there is the modern relativity site
    http://www.modernrelativitysite.com/


    curious if equations can be done
    <FONT FACE=SYMBOL>G</FONT><SUP><FONT FACE=SYMBOL>m</FONT></SUP><SUB><FONT FACE=SYMBOL>mn</FONT></SUB>

  34. 2012-Apr-26, 05:01 AM

    Reason
    post in wrong area

  35. #60
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    Feb 2013
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    En Espaņol
    Sky by Month. El Cielo del Mes
    http://www.youtube.com/user/fernandobeltranp

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