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Thread: Is there gold on Mars?

  1. #1
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    Is there gold on Mars?

    If/when we go to Mars...will we find minerals like gold/silver? Has anything hinting at this been found thus far?

  2. #2
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    Re: Is there gold on Mars?

    Quote Originally Posted by banquo's_bumble_puppy
    If/when we go to Mars...will we find minerals like gold/silver? Has anything hinting at this been found thus far?
    Sure, but probably not in any greater quantity than you find them here on Earth. It certainly wouldn't be cost-effective to ship them back here, though if we set up manufacturing facilities on Mars, it would be convenient to have such raw materials available when needed.

  3. #3
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    Re: Is there gold on Mars?

    Quote Originally Posted by Grey
    Sure, but probably not in any greater quantity than you find them here on Earth.
    Likely in lower quantity than on Earth. Mars has a density of only 3.9 g/cc compared to Earth's 5.5 g/cc. Plus, much of the Earth's mineable gold formed from hydrothermal deposits, something that's not likely to be as common on cold, dry Mars.

  4. #4
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    There's probably more than enough gold/silver on Mars to meed any real need on the planet. It would not make sense to burden any civilisation there with a meatalic or paper currency so it would either be barter or electronic based (probably both). Mars may well have more readily accesible gold (short term) than on Earth since there could be previously untouched aluvial/fluvial concentrations in some areas. Untill we know more about the geology we can't say whethr there has been much thermally driven circulating goundwater that could act as a concentrater. Most gold deposits on Earth have been re-worked (geologically) several times.

    On Earth men have spent fortunes on searching for the metal, extracting it, refining it and transporting it only to have it re-burried in deep vaults again. We actually have far more of the stuff than we need.

    The 'liquid gold' on Mars will be water and you wouldn't waste it processing a pretty useless metal!

  5. #5
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    Yes, but harder to find

    Yes there will be gold, silver, platinum and a whole host of other minerals. Although these will be much harder to mine and find due to the lack of stable hydrothermal activity on Mars which is probably due to the lack of plate tectonics and that due to the lack of mass. It's quite likely that the Tharsis volcanoes ejected heavy elements (gold, silver, platinum etc.), but who knows where they ejected to. Volcanos on Earth have been known to spew gold. Since these valuable resources are heavy, and due to Mars' lack of dynamic systems, gold and similar valuable resources will probably exist in greatest quantities near the core of the planet.

    Food for thought: Platinum is worth more than gold and often laces meteors. Meteors come from outside and hit the planet surface, so platinum may be a viable and somewhat abundant mineral quite near or on the Martian surface.

  6. #6
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    Necromancy alert! ~4 years

  7. #7
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    Hey, that's my line!

    Fred
    "For shame, gentlemen, pack your evidence a little better against another time."
    -- John Dryden, "The Vindication of The Duke of Guise" 1684

    Earth's sole legacy will be a very slight increase (0.01%) of the solar metallicity.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by frogesque View Post
    It would not make sense to burden any civilisation there with a meatalic or paper currency so it would either be barter or electronic based (probably both).
    Ah, but that is not entirely true. Since way back, when man first invented currencies, currencies have eventually collapsed, forcing people to go back to a true "gold/silver/any-item-of-true-value" standard (until a new currency was made). The problem is whenever banks or governments "make" digital or paper money ... it eventually becomes what it is: worthless. I suppose what I am saying is that gold will play an economical role for a long while yet. Especially since it is such a unique, useful, beautiful metal.

  9. #9
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    Wink

    I'd expect a trace of gold in the salty soils of Mars, similar to Terrestrial concentrations in the ocean.

    see:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold

  10. #10
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    Gold is only "so usefull". It's value remains as 'what you will do with it'.
    Electronic contacts....50 millionths thick will do the job.
    Jewellry? We have more than enough. And we mine more each day.
    There is not any good reason or value in mining metals...ANY metals from some fancifull source in space. The exchange rate is ridiculously rated even the most delierious fool would note the reality. It's like walking from New York to San Francisco for a pound of solder. You can do it....but why?
    Best regards,
    Dan

  11. #11
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    You'd be more likely to find gold and other precious metals on Mars's moons, which are captured asteroids.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    Gold is only "so usefull". It's value remains as 'what you will do with it'.
    Electronic contacts....50 millionths thick will do the job.
    Jewellry? We have more than enough. And we mine more each day.
    There is not any good reason or value in mining metals...ANY metals from some fancifull source in space. The exchange rate is ridiculously rated even the most delierious fool would note the reality. It's like walking from New York to San Francisco for a pound of solder. You can do it....but why?
    Best regards,
    Dan
    Actually I am pretty sure I've seen that it has been worked out that that even with current technology it would in theory at least be economically viable to mine particularly valuable siderophile metals like rhenium and the platinum group metals from asteroids due to their extremely high value and extreme rarity on Earth's surface due to virtually all Earth's supply being down in Earth's core.

  13. #13
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    Many cost for mining, many cost for traveling, many cost for construcctions.

    Man go to moon and need near 1 millions kilos from rocket for any kilo of rocks arrived from moon. Mars is farther that moon by that this relation will be more big.

    Probably with any price is prohibitive the extraction, same without mining (all the planet would be gold same probably prohibitive).

  14. #14
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    And more:

    The gravity of Mars is more near from Earh that from Moon, so the initial rocket need to have many more combustible to carry this and a rocket bigger for launch from Mars.

  15. #15
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    Nice thing, for some at least, is that there's no environmental (or labor, for that matter) laws on Mars. Nobody's going to care if you dump arsenic all over the place while extracting the gold.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonny5 View Post
    Yes there will be gold, silver, platinum and a whole host of other minerals. Although these will be much harder to mine and find due to the lack of stable hydrothermal activity on Mars which is probably due to the lack of plate tectonics and that due to the lack of mass. It's quite likely that the Tharsis volcanoes ejected heavy elements (gold, silver, platinum etc.), but who knows where they ejected to. Volcanos on Earth have been known to spew gold. Since these valuable resources are heavy, and due to Mars' lack of dynamic systems, gold and similar valuable resources will probably exist in greatest quantities near the core of the planet.

    Food for thought: Platinum is worth more than gold and often laces meteors. Meteors come from outside and hit the planet surface, so platinum may be a viable and somewhat abundant mineral quite near or on the Martian surface.
    Welcome to BAUT, Jonny5. From your post here, may I assume you have more than a passing interest and knowledge of geology? If so, you might be interested in our running geology thread:

    http://www.bautforum.com/science-tec...iscussion.html

    In any case, stick around.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuckerfan View Post
    Nice thing, for some at least, is that there's no environmental (or labor, for that matter) laws on Mars. Nobody's going to care if you dump arsenic all over the place while extracting the gold.

    Hey Joe, said now
    Where you gonna run to now?
    Where you gonna run to?
    Hey Joe, I said where you gonna run to now?
    Where you, where you gonna go?
    Well, dig it

    I'm goin' way up Mars,
    Way up to Mars mines
    Alright!
    I'm goin' way up Mars,
    Way up where I can be free
    Ain't no Green gonna find me

    Ain't no hangman gonna,
    He ain't gonna throw a law at me
    You better believe it right now
    I gotta go now

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