View Poll Results: Who are the most distant relatives you know?

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  • Relatives? I'm an orphan.

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  • Siblings, parents, grand parents

    1 10.00%
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    2 20.00%
  • Second cousins

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  • Third cousins

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Thread: Siblings, first cousins, nth cousins. Most distant relative you could identify?

  1. #1
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    Siblings, first cousins, nth cousins. Most distant relative you could identify?

    Another thread (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthre...-to-late-1800s) started veering into family relationships and degrees of consanguinity. For this poll, I'm only concerned with the most distant relative that you would know, say from meeting him or her at a family reunion, wedding, or funeral. In my case, it's my mother's second cousins, who (If I get this right....) would be my second cousins, once removed.
    Last edited by swampyankee; 2013-Sep-29 at 12:23 PM.
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  2. #2
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    I'm a third cousin once removed to former US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. If deceased relatives count, I'm also a distant, many removes cousin of both George Armstrong Custer and Herbert Hoover. And my wife is a descendant of King Henry II.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #3
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    I'm directly related to Daniel Boone, but not sure exactly how (to what degree a cousin or uncle).

  4. #4
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    If family tradition is correct, my several-greats uncle was Robert E. Lee. This means I'm something like sixth cousins with Robert Duvall, Lee Marvin, and a former manager of my apartment complex. For cousins I know with certainty are cousins, I'm Facebook friends with a few of my first cousins once removed (Simon's second cousins), though I've only seen one of them since they were all babies.
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  5. #5
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    I know a second cousin, after we sat down and worked through part of the family tree. Some Southerner I am, being usually unable to get the whole once-removed, twice-removed thing.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ngc3314 View Post
    I know a second cousin, after we sat down and worked through part of the family tree. Some Southerner I am, being usually unable to get the whole once-removed, twice-removed thing.
    I finally figured it out when my daughter was doing a genealogy project in high school. My father's family came to North America a long time ago (1635). We found ancestors who were Revolutionaries and Tories in the War of Independence and in both the US and Confederate armies in the Civil War. I'm sure that everybody whose family came here in the 17th Century would have the same sort of story.
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  7. #7
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    I have four half-siblings I've never met. Aside from that, both parents were adopted, so no dice.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Romanus View Post
    Aside from that, both parents were adopted, so no dice.
    Really? That's interesting. I wonder how many people have parents who were both adoptees. It's probably quite rare.

  9. #9
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    Jean-Baptiste Charboneau. "Pompey" the baby of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

    I've been looking into my family for a couple of years, and I've noticed something that I find very hard to believe. It seems that all of the Charboneau's and Charbonneau's in the U.S. and Canada seem to be descendent's of one immigrant to Canada who arrived there in abt. 1659.

    As I say, I find it very hard to believe that only one married couple immigrated to this continent and populated it so throughly.

    ETA: Gee, I hope this doesn't get kicked over to ATM.
    Last edited by AstroRockHunter; 2013-Sep-28 at 08:07 PM.
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  10. #10
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    I met two of my great grand parents on my dad's side and lived with two of my great grandparents on my moms side. Every year I would visit my great grand mother's sister and brother. For a time, I lived with my great grand mother's Sister's children and grand children. (My iPhone insists "Sister's" always capitalized.)

  11. #11
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    I've never met the baby (who now has children of her own), but
    my grandmother, her daughter (my aunt), her daughter (my first
    cousin), her daughter (my first cousin once removed), and her
    daughter (the baby, my first cousin twice removed) were in a
    photo together in the newspaper because somebody thought
    it was interesting to show five generations in which the oldest
    child was female.

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  12. #12
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    A math teacher at my high school was the granddaughter of my great-grandmother's cousin (I think). I don't recall what that makes us (Xth cousins, Y times removed).

    I do believe that another relative of that same great-grandmother was Lawrence Welk's wife.

    And I could probably claim astronaut Alan Bean as a very distant relative, since we're both Clan MacBain. He took a piece of the clan tartan to the moon with him.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by AstroRockHunter View Post
    Jean-Baptiste Charboneau. "Pompey" the baby of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

    I've been looking into my family for a couple of years, and I've noticed something that I find very hard to believe. It seems that all of the Charboneau's and Charbonneau's in the U.S. and Canada seem to be descendent's of one immigrant to Canada who arrived there in abt. 1659.

    As I say, I find it very hard to believe that only one married couple immigrated to this continent and populated it so throughly.

    ETA: Gee, I hope this doesn't get kicked over to ATM.
    There are, at last count, about 40,000 people in the US (plus a few more in Canada) with my surname who can be traced to one man who immigrated in 1635. There may have been non-relatives who took the same surname (some of my ancestors may have been slave owners, although I don't think the ones in New England had enough money) and non-relatives who immigrated later. I've heard, somewhere, that being descended from somebody on the Mayflower is not as special as some people think: about 25% of the people in the US fall into that group.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    I've never met the baby (who now has children of her own), but
    my grandmother, her daughter (my aunt), her daughter (my first
    cousin), her daughter (my first cousin once removed), and her
    daughter (the baby, my first cousin twice removed) were in a
    photo together in the newspaper because somebody thought
    it was interesting to show five generations in which the oldest
    child was female.
    Newspapers often show four generational pics. My son, my wife, her mother, *her* father and his mother appeared once.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tobin Dax View Post
    A math teacher at my high school was the granddaughter of my great-grandmother's cousin (I think). I don't recall what that makes us (Xth cousins, Y times removed).
    One of your parents and the math teacher are third cousins then, right? You'd be fourth cousins with a child of the math teacher.

    My brother shared a house with three guys, found out later one was a third cousin.

  15. #15
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    Taking "you could identify" as meaning recognizing and greeting as family when we meet:
    I got to talking to an American trainee once who mentioned that she'd visited a graveyard and found the grave of the brother of one of her ancestors who'd emigrated to America, upon hearing which graveyard I realized that we were probably related, and that I could find out how, as I not only know I'm descended of most of the population of that small island if we go far enough back, but I also knew that all the records had already been computerized (by my father).
    So I've met an American where we managed to identify a common ancestor who was born in the last part of the 1600's, making us thirteenth cousins or so, I can't remember the exact detail any more.

    Apart from that, I'd guess it's fifth or sixth cousins.
    Last edited by HenrikOlsen; 2013-Sep-30 at 10:32 AM.
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  16. #16
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    These days, I stick with family members starting from my mother (borthers, sisters, and their offspring). I'm the youngest of many children, so was my mother. My grandfather was (IIRC) nearly 90 years older than me! So one generation above my mother, I hardly know anyone.

  17. #17
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    This poll needs additional options....for instance, I'm an only child, and both my parents are dead...and I haven't spoken with my first cousins since the early 70's....just lost touch...

    In other words, none of the options given applies to me.

  18. #18
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    My mother's sister married my father's brother and they had three sons. Are they my zeroeth cousins?

  19. #19
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    Nope; still first cousins. You have to traverse one generation to get to them.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    My mother's sister married my father's brother and they had three sons. Are they my zeroeth cousins?
    Double first cousins, in fact.

    Since first cousins share common grandparents, I guess zeroeth cousins would share parents, in other words, siblings.

    It hasn't come up yet in this thread but since many people don't understand the difference between nth cousins and removed cousins:

    Nth cousins are in the SAME generation from the common ancestor. First cousins share grandparents, 2nd cousins share great-grandparents, and so on back.
    Removed cousins are from DIFFERENT generations. If your grandparents are my great-grandparents, we're first cousins once removed. The removal can be in either direction. Your first cousins kids are first cousins once removed. Her grandkids are twice removed.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #21
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    Is the degree of removal different in different directions? My first cousin's son is my first cousin once removed but I'm his second cousin once removed, right? Our common ancestor is one generation farther back for him than for me.

  22. #22
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    My great-great-great-grandfather had three brothers. He stayed in Wales, one brother went to the US, one to Australia and one to Argentina.
    I have dozens of cousins in Beunos Aries, but the one I am in contact with lives in the Napa Valley, Ca. thre scion of the family branch that went North.
    Weird thing is he is my age, but he is of the generation of my children. Generations roll faster in America!
    That makes us fourth cousins . In fact we are no more likely to share common genes than a random member of the public with either of us - but we are Family!

    John

  23. #23
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    Voted "Siblings, parents, grand parents".

    We emigrated from the Netherlands to N.Z. when I was 1.5; so while I've met some of the extended family and have even hosted cousins who've travelled to N.Z. - I really wouldn't recognise any of them.

    Growing up, I always thought it was kind of weird that people had cousins and uncles and such.
    I don't see any Ice Giants.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    Is the degree of removal different in different directions? My first cousin's son is my first cousin once removed but I'm his second cousin once removed, right? Our common ancestor is one generation farther back for him than for me.
    Nope. It isn't how far back the common ancestor is; it's the generation of descent. My first cousin is of the same generation as I am. Likewise my second cousin, third cousin, and so forth. But my first cousin's son is a generation away from me, and his children will be two generations away and so forth. His children will still be my first cousins, but they'll be first cousins twice removed. Each "remove" is a generation. Each level of cousin is a further level since the common ancestor.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    Is the degree of removal different in different directions? My first cousin's son is my first cousin once removed but I'm his second cousin once removed, right? Our common ancestor is one generation farther back for him than for me.
    No, like Gillian says, you are first cousins once removed to each other. Glad you asked, this is why I put that on here. Your children, if you have any, would be second cousins to your cousin's son.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #26
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    The most distant ones I have known personally are second cousins once removed.

    The relationships are sometimes confusing on my mother's side of the family because of the enormous age range. Her mother was one of 10 siblings over a period of 21 years, and their children were born over a period of over 40 years. Aunts and uncles who were younger than some of their nieces and nephews were not uncommon in this extended family.

    If we add my father's stepfather to the mix, his mother was a great-grandmother figure to me.

  27. #27
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    A couple of my first cousins just turned fifty-something the other day. (They're twins.) They are over fifteen years older than I am, because their mom married early, and my dad married late. On my mom's side, the youngest of my first cousins are starting college. On my dad's side, the oldest of my first cousins once removed have been in college for a few years. Simon has second cousins on that side ranging from about seven to somewhere in their twenties. (The only one whose age I'm certain of turns twenty-two in December.) In none of these cases has the issue been large families, however. I think the largest family is my aunt's; she had four sons. It's just that we start our families at ages ranging from seventeen to forty-something, have a couple of kids, and then stop.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    A couple of my first cousins just turned fifty-something the other day. (They're twins.) They are over fifteen years older than I am, because their mom married early, and my dad married late. On my mom's side, the youngest of my first cousins are starting college. On my dad's side, the oldest of my first cousins once removed have been in college for a few years. Simon has second cousins on that side ranging from about seven to somewhere in their twenties. (The only one whose age I'm certain of turns twenty-two in December.) In none of these cases has the issue been large families, however. I think the largest family is my aunt's; she had four sons. It's just that we start our families at ages ranging from seventeen to forty-something, have a couple of kids, and then stop.
    My sister has a grandchild that is older than my son. No teenage moms involved.

  29. #29
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    An my wife has an uncle younger than she is. Her Mom was the first child in the family and her uncle was an afterthought.

    My wife was just contacted by a second cousin looking for family history information. He's thrilled to find someone who has some.

    We've met lots and lots of very distant cousins at assorted family reunions while doing our genealogy research.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  30. #30
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    My mother does a lot of genealogy research, and has traced her family tree supposedly back to Italian royalty. My father's father's side of the family apparently came to the US by jumping ship at the turn of the century under an assumed name, so details are obscure before that point.

    I recently learned that my paternal great-grandparents were first cousins, which makes me a little uncomfortable, but apparently it was not that uncommon at the time.
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