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Thread: R.I.P. Ray Bradbury

  1. #1
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    R.I.P. Ray Bradbury

    Truly a huge influnce on my SF reading as a lad

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    R.I.P. Ray Bradbury, Author of Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles

    Ray Bradbury author of The Martian Chronicles, Fahrenheit 451, Something Wicked This Way Comes, and many more literary classics died this morning in Los Angeles, at the age of 91.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  3. #3
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    "Fahrenheit: 451" my favorite.

    His wife was online about 10 years ago; fielding fans' questions. I asked what Mr. Bradbury's favorite meal was. She replied "Pancakes and link sausages."

    Postscript: That's wrong. It was Robert Heinlein's wife, not Bradbury's. Sorry!
    Last edited by Buttercup; 2012-Jun-06 at 05:31 PM.

  4. #4
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    He had to go some time, but it still feels as if we've been diminished. There are many better writers who have emerged in the past few decades, but he was something of a pioneer.

  5. #5
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    He seems like the last of the great "Golden Age" science fiction writers to go: Asimov, Heinlein, Clarke, and now Bradbury.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

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    I just heard. It's upset me a bit, actually. It was good knowing he was still out there.

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    The news of his passing this morning was one of the few things that could crack my otherwise androidian lack of emotions. After wiping the tears from my eyes (a couple times) I could take a breath and get back to work.

    Bradbury has been my favorite author for a very long time, and I always knew that when he eventually passed it would be tough to wrap my head around. How could he ever go away? Thankfully, he won't. That is the magic of his craft. I'm also thankful for the long, amazing life he lead, and for the inspiring example he set for anyone who has ever even thought about putting words to paper.

    Still, even though I was never fortunate enough to meet him in person, I will miss him greatly.
    Last edited by Fazor; 2012-Jun-06 at 04:42 PM. Reason: baffling typo corrected

  8. #8
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    Remembering Ray Bradbury

    Sadly , The Great Ray Bradbury passed away today at 91 years old. He will be missed. He had a creative
    and endearing writing style in the vein of so many great writers like Jules Verne and Robert Heinlein.
    He will be missed and remembered.

    Dan

  9. #9
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    (Threads merged.)

    He wrote some very intriguing and entertaining stories. In fact, I'm not sure he was a writer so much as a story teller, and that's a good thing.
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  10. #10
    I was just thinking about Mr. Bradbury yesterday, during the Venus transit. The next one won't happen for over 100 years, so it was frustrating for me (and as I understand it, many others around the world) to be unable to directly observe because of cloudy skies. It reminded me of his short story "All Summer in a Day", in which humans have colonized Venus, where it's continually cloudy and raining... except once every seven years, the sun comes out for just one hour. A little girl misses it because her cruel classmates have locked her in a closet.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mapguy View Post
    It reminded me of his short story "All Summer in a Day", in which humans have colonized Venus, where it's continually cloudy and raining... except once every seven years, the sun comes out for just one hour. A little girl misses it because her cruel classmates have locked her in a closet.
    That's one of my favorite examples of Bradbury's hauntingly human approach to storytelling. It's sci-fi, but not about sci-fi. It's a simple observation on typical human behavior, yet it's horrifyingly and gut-wrenching. It taps into aspects of every day life that most of us (or at least, myself) see, feel, and experience, but could never put into words.

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    I may see if our local art house cinema will put one of his films on in tribute - we can but ask.

  13. #13
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    I found Bradbury when I was, oh, about ten, when I read "Uncle Einar" in fourth or fifth grade. The ending, the expression of love between a parent and his children, makes me cry still, so many years later.

    "Oh, oh, what a kite! What a kite! Oh, I wish I'd a kite like that! Where, where did you get it!"

    "Our father made it!" cried Meg and Michael and Stephen and Ronald, and gave an exultant pull on the twine and the humming, thundering kite in the sky dipped and soared and made a great and magical exclamation mark across a cloud!

  14. #14
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    June in old ketchup bottles.

    Hold summer in your hand, pour summer in a glass, a tiny glass of course, the smallest tingling sip for children; change the season in your veins by raising glass to lip and tilting summer in.

    Dandelion wine. Dandelion wine. Dandelion wine...

  15. #15
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    To me, the most memorable story is the one Fazor cited - "All Summer in a Day", which I often find myself thinking about, including this morning when clouds prevented me from seeing the transit. (I saw the previous one.)

    Other memorable stories include "The Fruit at the Bottom of the Bowl", "A Sound of Thunder", and pretty much all the stories in The Silver Locusts*, especially "There will come soft rains".

    *The Martian Chronicles in the US

  16. #16
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    Though my reading of his work has always been limited (a couple of novels and an anthology), I was consistently impressed by his craftsmanship, and his always stunning descriptions. The Martian Chronicles has long been a favorite of mine that I go back to time and time again, and for which I am in fact overdue. As for Fahrenheit 451, I think its membership in what I call the Great Dystopian Triad (that is, with 1984 and Brave New World) is secure.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mapguy View Post
    I was just thinking about Mr. Bradbury yesterday, during the Venus transit. The next one won't happen for over 100 years, so it was frustrating for me (and as I understand it, many others around the world) to be unable to directly observe because of cloudy skies. It reminded me of his short story "All Summer in a Day", in which humans have colonized Venus, where it's continually cloudy and raining... except once every seven years, the sun comes out for just one hour. A little girl misses it because her cruel classmates have locked her in a closet.
    That is the story I read in elementary school. I've been a sci-fi fan for life because of him.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mapguy View Post
    I was just thinking about Mr. Bradbury yesterday, during the Venus transit. The next one won't happen for over 100 years, so it was frustrating for me (and as I understand it, many others around the world) to be unable to directly observe because of cloudy skies. It reminded me of his short story "All Summer in a Day", in which humans have colonized Venus, where it's continually cloudy and raining... except once every seven years, the sun comes out for just one hour. A little girl misses it because her cruel classmates have locked her in a closet.
    This was also exactly the story that I was thinking of yesterday, for exactly the same reason.

  19. #19
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    My favorites were "Kaleidoscope", "All Summer in a Day" and "The Rocket".
    Solfe

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    "You're only given one little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it." Robin Williams.

  20. #20
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    I only learned a few years ago that Bradbury wrote
    the storyline for the animated walk-through exhibit
    on the second floor of the Colosseum at the 1962
    World's Fair in Seattle, which impressed me no end
    at age nine.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis
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    were just going to sit here and look." -- "Van Rijn"

    "The other planets? Well, they just happen to be there, but the
    point of rockets is to explore them!" -- Kai Yeves

  21. #21
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    One of my favourite television programs....:

    " People ask..." Where do you get all your ideas?" . Well, right here.All this is my martian landscape. Somewhere in this room is an African sveldt; beyond,perhaps, is a small Illinois town where I grew up. And I'm surrounded by my 'magician's toy shop' . I'll never starve here. I just look around, find what I need, and begin.
    I'm Ray Bradbury .... " .

    Wasn't it great to see and get to know one of the great writers of a golden age?

    Dan

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinaa View Post
    That is the story I read in elementary school. I've been a sci-fi fan for life because of him.
    I read that story in the 4th grade. I remember causing a bit of a ruckus for railing against the idea of Venusian terraforming with my teacher at the time. I thought it was the stupidest thing I'd ever heard, trying to get an Earthlike environment on a planet who's day is longer than its year.

    I still enjoyed the Martian Chronicles, even though they too were pretty much blown out of the water by reality. He was a great speculative writer, something I've come to appreciate more as I've grown older.

  23. #23
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    Ray Bradbury was my favorite author, and a huge part of my childhood. I'll never forget staying up late listening to Bradbury 13 on WRKF. I'll never forget reading Frost and Fire. I'll never forget falling in love with Cecy, the April Witch.

  24. #24
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    I'd suggest taking the 15 minutes to listen to this one. It's Neil Gaiman reading The man who forgot Ray Bradbury.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by HenrikOlsen View Post
    I'd suggest taking the 15 minutes to listen to this one. It's Neil Gaiman reading The man who forgot Ray Bradbury.
    Thank you very much for the link, Henrik. An excellent tribute - I am glad Mr Bradbury got to hear it.

  26. #26
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    Someone else I'll never get to meet. Growing up, I really wanted to meet men like John Huston, John Housman, Orsen Wells--and Ray and Issac--and Carl Sagan were at the top of the list. I did meet Forry Ackerman at least, but only for a few minutes. Even got to talk to Robert Forward. He called me back but I was still half asleep having to work overnight shifts.

    I guess this means Warren Beatty will live forever.
    Last edited by publiusr; 2012-Jun-15 at 08:41 PM.

  27. #27
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    Apparently, one of my cousins sat next to Ray Bradbury on a train once. Nice guy.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    Someone else I'll never get to meet. Growing up, I really wanted to meet men like John Huston, John Housman, Orsen Wells--and Ray and Issac--and Carl Sagan were at the top of the list. I did meet Forry Ackerman at least, but only for a few minutes. Even got to talk to Robert Forward. He called me back but i was still halv asleep having to work overnight shifts.

    I guess this means Warren Beatty will live forever.
    Never got to meet Ray Bradbury, although I think he'd be one of the better ones to talk to. <name drop>I did get to meet Ben Bova and Harry Harrison (I suspect he's likely to have the best parties ), at the first of the John W Campbell Awards (Leon Stover was an organizing force, and I was taking his SF class). Barry Malzburg was there, but I did not meet him. I think Jim Gunn was there, too, but I don't remember annoying him, personally. </name drop>
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  29. #29
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    Here is one for Musk. F(orget) sterilization protocol. If your capsule finds it's way to Mars--a lock of his hair--a copy of his book--ashes--something--needs to go up there.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mapguy View Post
    I was just thinking about Mr. Bradbury yesterday, during the Venus transit. The next one won't happen for over 100 years, so it was frustrating for me (and as I understand it, many others around the world) to be unable to directly observe because of cloudy skies. It reminded me of his short story "All Summer in a Day", in which humans have colonized Venus, where it's continually cloudy and raining... except once every seven years, the sun comes out for just one hour. A little girl misses it because her cruel classmates have locked her in a closet.
    Ray Bradbury died during the Venus transit.

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