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Thread: Does Anyone Here Have Dyslexia?

  1. #1
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    Does Anyone Here Have Dyslexia?

    I know there are varying degrees of Dyslexia and I am sure there are different experiences, but would anyone be able to explain what it is like for them? I hate self diagnosing but I am really starting to suspect that there is something more going on than me just being flighty. I always thought it was just backwards numbers and letters but I was at the end of my rope today and decided to look it up. As it turns out it is way more than the mainstream understanding, but the explanations were so medical and I am not sure if it pertains to me or not.

    I spoke to my mother, a little while ago. She had told me, a long time ago, that I was tested for Dyslexia when I was in first grade but that was because I always got my b's and d's confused and wrote my 7's and 3's backwards. I learned, tonight, that my mother was also tested for Dyslexia when she was a kid but they decided that she had a reading comprehension problem.

    For me, I will read something and swear I read it right. Only to find out that I completely missed letters and sometimes entire words. They are not backwards or upside down or in the wrong place; I don't see them at all. I can't think of how many names, on this board alone, that I read wrong. When I catch it, though, and read back I can't understand how I didn't see it the first time. I take a really long time to read books and I thought that holding a bookmark beneath the line I am reading would help but I still find myself reading the same sentence repeatedly because when I get to the end, I've forgotten the beginning of the sentence.

    The worst; what brought me to tears today, was math. I have always had a hard time with math and just called myself math illiterate. I bought a pre algebra and an algebra book to brush up on my math skills because next week I am setting an appointment to take my college placement test. I am literally doing grade school math, right now; the big four with fractions. I failed the first practice test and couldn't figure out how I was getting them wrong. I had the processes down but I was copying the equations wrong. Aware that I was prone to that kind of mistake, I was placing my thumbnail on the book, right above the part of the equation I was writing down and I still managed to do things like write 1 4/9 when the actual number in the equation was 4 1/9. I feel like the harder I try to focus, the more I mix up the numbers. I failed three more practice quizzes for simply misplacing numbers.

    This is just turning into frustration babble now. I was just wondering if this is similar to what a person with Dyslexia experiences or have I completely missed the mark?

  2. #2
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    I can't answer your questions, closetgeek, but I would recommend getting tested professionally for dyslexia or other learning disorders before you take the entrance exam. If you do have some type of learning disability, it would be better to address it and get the accommodations you need sooner rather than later.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by closetgeek View Post
    I have always had a hard time with math and just called myself math illiterate.
    I would recommend what @Tobin Dax said. Dyslexia is used these days for a catch-all name for all kinds of reading disorders, some of which can be easily remedied. In the past I've given lots of coaching to kids who thought they were useless at maths (innumeracy by the way ). A few had a specific reading problem which when identified made spectacular progress. But it does need expert evaluation.

    By the way, I do have a huge problem with spelling. I can usually spot spelling mistakes by others, but never my own. Sometimes I wonder whether this counts as mild dyslexia. Once I applied for a job, and on the application form said I had a degree in pysics.

  4. #4
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    At least you didn't claim a degree in psychics.
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  5. #5
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    Definitely get tested; most colleges will provide accommodations (note taking assistance, permission to tape lectures, extra time, etc), but they may demand testing to demonstrate any kind of learning disability. They will most certainly do so if you do not have an established program -- an IEP -- from secondary school, and may do so if you go to college outside Florida, as they may not honor a result from a Florida school system.

    The testing is not cheap; my younger daughter has a well-documented learning disability (from pre-kindergarden through today), but the college she went to (in New York) required testing from an agency in New York. The tests cost about $1000, all out of pocket.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Definitely get tested; most colleges will provide accommodations (note taking assistance, permission to tape lectures, extra time, etc), but they may demand testing to demonstrate any kind of learning disability. They will most certainly do so if you do not have an established program -- an IEP -- from secondary school, and may do so if you go to college outside Florida, as they may not honor a result from a Florida school system.

    The testing is not cheap; my younger daughter has a well-documented learning disability (from pre-kindergarden through today), but the college she went to (in New York) required testing from an agency in New York. The tests cost about $1000, all out of pocket.
    The cost of testing is what kind of makes me reluctant. I also have no idea where an adult would go for that kind of testing. This stuff is usually done through the school.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
    I would recommend what @Tobin Dax said. Dyslexia is used these days for a catch-all name for all kinds of reading disorders, some of which can be easily remedied. In the past I've given lots of coaching to kids who thought they were useless at maths (innumeracy by the way ). A few had a specific reading problem which when identified made spectacular progress. But it does need expert evaluation.

    By the way, I do have a huge problem with spelling. I can usually spot spelling mistakes by others, but never my own. Sometimes I wonder whether this counts as mild dyslexia. Once I applied for a job, and on the application form said I had a degree in pysics.
    Ah, and where does one get this degree in pysics?
    When I was coloring eggs with my kids, I was making lucky eggs with each person's name on it. I mispelled the first half of my fiance's name which, by extention means I mispelled my own name. Christopher & Christina. I did the same thing on my first college application.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by closetgeek View Post
    The cost of testing is what kind of makes me reluctant. I also have no idea where an adult would go for that kind of testing. This stuff is usually done through the school.
    Any public school administrator should be able to tell you about agencies; for a college, you'll have to find out which agencies they'll accept. As I said, if you chose a school outside of your home state, the college will want you tested by someplace local to them. You could also shop around, and talk to the various disabilities rights organizations in the area of your intended school. My daughter has a rather complex set of issues, including speech impairments and audio processing disorder, which may be more difficult to test for than would dyslexia.
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

  9. #9
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    I was dagnosed as having a subset of dyslexia, caled dysgraphia. I can read just fine, it's writing that gives me fits. I cannot string more than 5-7 letters together without having to stop and think about what comes next.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaptain K View Post
    I was dagnosed as having a subset of dyslexia, caled dysgraphia. I can read just fine, it's writing that gives me fits. I cannot string more than 5-7 letters together without having to stop and think about what comes next.
    Was it some kind of cruel joke? You'd think they would've given your condition a shorter name.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by closetgeek View Post
    Was it some kind of cruel joke? You'd think they would've given your condition a shorter name.
    Probably not. That would imply that the people who describe LD diagnoses have sense of humor.
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

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