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Thread: Will we float if there is no more oxygen on earth?

  1. #1
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    Will we float if there is no more oxygen on earth?

    Just thinking after seeing this link passed to me by my friend http://www.pulseuniform.com/nursing/trees-our-friends.asp i know that trees makes oxygen and i know that other planet has no oxygen. so does this means that no oxygen means we can float? Any answer here?

  2. #2
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    I don't know how you are connecting Oxygen to floating (on water? AKA H2O?) unless perhaps this is a reference to the "She's A Witch" sketch in "Monty Python and the Holy Grail".

    Can you elaborate on what you mean?
    Forming opinions as we speak

  3. #3
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    No oxygen just means we would die. Simplistically in order for us to float the buoyancy force we get from the atmosphere we displace would have to be stronger than the downwards forces due to gravity (which is why it is easier to float in water). So the atmosphere would have to be much, much denser for us to float. Denser than water, in fact, as that is the major component of us. Removing the oxygen would not lead to this being the case.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinsteves025 View Post
    Just thinking after seeing this link passed to me by my friend http://www.pulseuniform.com/nursing/...ur-friends.asp i know that trees makes oxygen and i know that other planet has no oxygen.
    Be careful in how you translate those things. The article says "produces", and omits the detail of "free oxygen".

    The only way you can truly "make" oxygen is by fusion. Trees break up molecules to release the oxygen.

    Plenty of other bodies have lots of oxygen. Mars, for example, is 95% CO2. That translates to an atmosphere that is about 66% oxygen.

  5. #5
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    Mars's atmosphere is awfully thin, so there isn't a whole lot of
    carbon dioxide in it. Still, there is enough that a hydrogen-filled
    balloon could float in it.

    -- Jeff, in Minneapolis
    http://www.FreeMars.org/jeff/

    "I find astronomy very interesting, but I wouldn't if I thought we
    were just going to sit here and look." -- "Van Rijn"

    "The other planets? Well, they just happen to be there, but the
    point of rockets is to explore them!" -- Kai Yeves

  6. #6
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    It sounds like you're somehow associating oxygen with gravity. The two have nothing to do with each other, except that if you get enough oxygen in one place (say, several trillion tons), you will be able to feel its gravity.

    No, things do not "float" on other planets. They may fall more slowly, or more rapidly, than they do on Earth, depending on the surface gravity.

    Visit the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal and look at the pictures and films that were made on the Moon. The Moon has no atmosphere at all, practically speaking, and things do not "float around" there.

    Fred
    "For shame, gentlemen, pack your evidence a little better against another time."
    -- John Dryden, "The Vindication of The Duke of Guise" 1684

  7. #7
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    I think I see the connection. We float in Low Earth orbit where there is negligible oxygen outside the ISS = international space station. It is the almost 18,000 miles per hour circling Earth that causes people to float, so the lack of oxygen is not the cause of floating, but canceled gravity causes floating. Neil

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinsteves025 View Post
    Just thinking after seeing this link passed to me by my friend http://www.pulseuniform.com/nursing/...ur-friends.asp i know that trees makes oxygen and i know that other planet has no oxygen. so does this means that no oxygen means we can float? Any answer here?
    We'd die of anoxia. The atmosphere, which is about 80% nitrogen and 20% oxygen, has a density of about 1.22 kilograms per cubic meter, while human bodies have a density of about 1000 kilograms per cubic meter. Venus, which has the densest atmosphere of the terrestrial planets, has a maximum density of about 65 kg/m^3, far too low for somebody to float (but with a temperature of about 735K, sinking would be the least of your problems).

    Titan's is about 5.2 kg/m^3. You may be able to float in Jupiter's atmosphere, but the pressure would probably kill you as the local pressure would change the biochemical reactions of life.
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Root View Post
    Mars's atmosphere is awfully thin, so there isn't a whole lot of
    carbon dioxide in it. Still, there is enough that a hydrogen-filled
    balloon could float in it.
    Yes; although I may not have been clear, I was going for a ratio rather than quantity related to the trees and "no oxygen" comment.

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