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Thread: Back when I went to school...

  1. #91
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    Probably my college banned gambling -- it was illegal, in any event. Of course, I played penny poker. Toughest money I ever made -- I graduated up about $1.98
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  2. #92
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    In my primary school there was a marbles season. Generally the girls set up stalls and the boys rolled marbles to lose or win. The varieties accepted were a) cardboard boxes with varied slots labelled 2,4 and so on, b) straight lines of x marbles where you rolled from x paces back and c) triangles like snooker arrangements for larger pots also paced back. Market forces and risk assessment strongly in evidence. I seem to remember the set ups with huge numbers of marbles to win attracted the most pitchers and also won the most marble wealth over the long run. The prize was only limited by the size of the playground.

  3. #93
    When I went to school, the Concorde still flew. Then it didn't. Then it did again. Then it didn't ever again.
    When I went to school, the Shuttle still flew. Then it didn't. Then it did again. Then it didn't again. Then it did again.

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    In my primary school there was a marbles season. .
    Yes, mine too. There was a two-tier social hierarchy. Everybody could buy or win glass marbles of any size, but the boys with fathers working in engineering who managed to get steel ball bearings to use as marbles were envied by the rest. I think there was an exchange rate of one steel for ten glass of the same size.

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles View Post
    Yes, mine too. There was a two-tier social hierarchy. Everybody could buy or win glass marbles of any size, but the boys with fathers working in engineering who managed to get steel ball bearings to use as marbles were envied by the rest. I think there was an exchange rate of one steel for ten glass of the same size.
    I do not remember ball bearings being used but the conversion rate is interesting, it is higher than the density ratio.

  6. #96
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    We called those "steelies"! Sometimes they turned into "stealies".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    In my primary school there was a marbles season. Generally the girls set up stalls and the boys rolled marbles to lose or win. The varieties accepted were a) cardboard boxes with varied slots labelled 2,4 and so on, b) straight lines of x marbles where you rolled from x paces back and c) triangles like snooker arrangements for larger pots also paced back. Market forces and risk assessment strongly in evidence. I seem to remember the set ups with huge numbers of marbles to win attracted the most pitchers and also won the most marble wealth over the long run. The prize was only limited by the size of the playground.
    I remember a college biochemistry class I had about 1975. There was a chemical process for which a common gaming marble was placed into a test tube over a solution so as to cap it, but not too tightly. Or it helped it reflux or something. Anyway, the professor told us that it was getting harder and harder to find marbles each year, because the kids didn't play with them anymore and the stores no longet sold them

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Anyway, the professor told us that it was getting harder and harder to find marbles each year
    Isn't it a well known fact that professors generally lose their marbles?

  9. #99
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    I lost all my marbles regularly. Then there was the season for five stones for boys and jacks for girls. Five dice like chalk cubes are tossed from palm to back of hand and while in the air stacking or picking up manouvres are done without dropping the tossed cubes. The jacks are eight pointed stars which nest and similar trials are done while tossing and catching a ball. Good games for hand eye coordination, now replaced with phone keypads.

  10. #100
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    I was born the year President Kennedy was shot.

    I missed slide rule practice. I am not sure by how much. In HS, our Math room had a very large slide rule leaning up against the wall in the corner. Both of the math teachers I had, confessed that they 'sort of remembered' but had no interest in actually using a slide rule ever again.

    We went to a small rural school. Almost every truck had a gun rack, and most had guns in them. As a junior, in vocational school, I was allowed to work on my Model 1911 Colt. (Yes, I was 17)

    A student in my class married our Government teacher. (After we graduated.) A different student in my class passed English by sleeping with the teacher. (Who was also the librarian.) This same librarian hand painted over covers of books that she considered risque.

    Cheerleaders wore saddle shoes.

    Our science teacher had us build solar ovens to bake bread, inefficient parabolic reflectors, and personally bought an 18" Fresnel lens so I could make a device that melted lead with the sun. (It didn't quite, but it would cook a pizza roll in about 12 seconds.)

    TJ

  11. #101
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    Mimeographs smelled nice.
    Solfe

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  12. #102
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    there was a sweet smelling blue glue we used to stick paper to paper.... thanks for the redolent prompt. there was paper money 240 p to the pound and halfpennies and farthings. A real farthing would buy one licquorice blackjack. Later the exotic smells of the chemistry lab. The gas was still coal gas. If you surreptitiously blew down your bunsen burner, all the bunsens in the whole lab would progressively go out. Ah yes and then the whole lab was evacuated because one lad cooked up an explosive mix trying to silver plate his penknife. Happy days.

  13. #103
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    Now that you mention it, there was a paste we used in kindergarten that was really delicious. Not that we'd go and eat a jar of it, but sometrimes you had to lick some off a finger after a messy piece of artwork, and that was okay. Then again, I'd probably have gone and eaten a jar had they let me. It had a nice astringency to it, though surely I didn't know that word. I think that sometime after that, "Elmer's Glue" took over, and nobody liked the taste of that.

  14. #104
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    I remember in primary school our first encounter with the Great Mystery. In those days, girls always wore skirts. Always. In the playground there arose the general puzzlement amongst the boys that girls' knickers, of which there were tantalizing glimpses when there was a strong wind, were of various colours. A bewildering array of colours, whereas male undergarments were either white or off-white, according to their age and frequency of washing. It was a great mystery as to why there was this difference in colour awareness. I wonder whether primary school children these days agonize over the same issues.

  15. #105
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    Name:  smile_grandpa.gif
Views: 113
Size:  2.4 KB Back when I went to school:

    We took notes on stone tablets. The sound of chisels was deafening.

    In shop class we made..... chisels.

    Our science class studied one thing -- fire. Oh, and we also dissected trilobites. Our teacher said there was something new called a wheel but none of us really believed it.

    On field trips, we went to the zoo to see mastodons and dodos.
    "There are powers in this universe beyond anything you know. There is much you have to learn. Go to your homes. Go and give thought to the mysteries of the universe. I will leave you now, in peace." --Galaxy Being

  16. #106
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    Never went to the masons myself but we could hear your din even over the crash of asteroids and meteorites. We had the wheel though, but no axles.

  17. #107
    Back when I went to school, Tiff Needell still described my slow, old piece of junk as a "modern supercar".

  18. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    When I went to school, the Concorde still flew. Then it didn't. Then it did again. Then it didn't ever again.
    When I went to school, the Shuttle still flew. Then it didn't. Then it did again. Then it didn't again. Then it did again.
    When I was in school, there was NACA. Then there wasn't. Sputnik was launched. Explorer I (called that only in retrospect) was launched. So was Telstar. So were Yuri Gagarin, John Glenn, all the Mercury flights, all the Gemini flights, Apollo (we could go to the Moon in 1969. What happened (other than Nixon and Proxmire)?. Lockheed Constellations and DC-7s were still in commercial service (as opposed to drug running).

    Oh, and the Wall was built. I'm glad I got to see it torn down, even if only on TV.
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  19. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    Oh, and the Wall was built.
    Berlin or China?
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

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  20. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Berlin or China?
    Yes.
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  21. #111
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    In the 4th grade the principal told me to apologize to my teacher or I would be punished. I refused so the teacher took me to the front of the class and paddled me. The paddle was only about 3/8 inch thick so it didn't hurt much-just stung a bit. And normally the kid being paddled would take a lick or two... start crying... and the teacher would say go take your seat--where the kid would put their head down and continue crying.

    The teacher was very angry and she hit me so many times her right arm got tired... so she switched the paddle to her left hand and kept hitting but I still wouldn't cry. It was surreal... looking at my classmates whose eyes were big as saucers.

    The teacher then began to hit me with the edge of the paddle behind my knees but still couldn't get me to cry. She finally told me to take my seat anyway... and when I sat down... I didn't put my head down on the desk... I just stared at her.

    I had bruises on the back of my legs and limped a little for a couple of days but she never slapped or paddled me again for the remaining six months of the school year.

  22. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by P Timmy View Post
    In the 4th grade the principal told me to apologize to my teacher or I would be punished. I refused so the teacher took me to the front of the class and paddled me. The paddle was only about 3/8 inch thick so it didn't hurt much-just stung a bit. And normally the kid being paddled would take a lick or two... start crying... and the teacher would say go take your seat--where the kid would put their head down and continue crying.

    The teacher was very angry and she hit me so many times her right arm got tired... so she switched the paddle to her left hand and kept hitting but I still wouldn't cry. It was surreal... looking at my classmates whose eyes were big as saucers.

    The teacher then began to hit me with the edge of the paddle behind my knees but still couldn't get me to cry. She finally told me to take my seat anyway... and when I sat down... I didn't put my head down on the desk... I just stared at her.

    I had bruises on the back of my legs and limped a little for a couple of days but she never slapped or paddled me again for the remaining six months of the school year.
    Aha, I figured there must have been a childhood incident triggering your philosophy regarding free will and punishment.
    "There are powers in this universe beyond anything you know. There is much you have to learn. Go to your homes. Go and give thought to the mysteries of the universe. I will leave you now, in peace." --Galaxy Being

  23. #113
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    Had the reverse experience in a way or maybe it's the same? Changed school at 12 years and found it difficult, however the housemaster kept disciplining me for having scruffy shoes and escalated to a beating with a cane every morning if my shoes were not polished. This made me popular. My shoes got scuffed bicycling to school. Then a proper show polishing box was installed when the powers realised the punishment wasn't working.

  24. #114
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    My parents signed a corporal punishment form when I was a kid. I never actually had it invoked on me, although I was pretty obnoxious in class. I suspect that this was because there were a total of 4 of us who's parents signed that form. One guy was trouble and gained the most attention while the other two were the nicest, most relaxed kids in any situation (and twins to boot).
    Solfe

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  25. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luckmeister View Post
    Aha, I figured there must have been a childhood incident triggering your philosophy regarding free will and punishment.
    I doubt that you know what my philosophy regarding free will and punishment is

    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    My parents signed a corporal punishment form when I was a kid.
    My 4th grade teacher was a "slapper"... and my parents had made it known to the Principal that if I needed corporal punishment to use a paddle instead of slapping.

  26. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luckmeister View Post
    Back when I went to school:

    We took notes on stone tablets. The sound of chisels was deafening.
    You had chisels. We dreamed of having chisels. We had to use our teeth. I remember some kid said his younger sister had evolved an opposable thumb, but we didn't believe it.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  27. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Now that you mention it, there was a paste we used in kindergarten that was really delicious. Not that we'd go and eat a jar of it, but sometrimes you had to lick some off a finger after a messy piece of artwork, and that was okay. Then again, I'd probably have gone and eaten a jar had they let me. It had a nice astringency to it, though surely I didn't know that word. I think that sometime after that, "Elmer's Glue" took over, and nobody liked the taste of that.
    I did. My wife says that must have helped make me what I am today.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  28. #118
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    In the second grade when we were all coloring... I pulled my shirt up and dried my front teeth and then proceeded to color them red. I then raised my hand for the teacher to come over... and when she did I gave her a big red-toothed smile... she put a hand to her chest and gasped as she took a step backwards

  29. #119
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    By the way, those old overhead transparency projectors have a quite serviceable Fresnel lens a good foot square.

  30. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    I think that sometime after that, "Elmer's Glue" took over, and nobody liked the taste of that.
    I never ate Elmer's Glue, but I did like spreading a thin layer of it over my skin, particularly my hands, letting it dry (it only took a couple of minutes), then peeling it off. It would pick up all your fingerprints, and would also take off a lot of the dirt on your skin. I would try to do it slowly and carefully to get as big a continous piece as possible. A thicker coating was more durable, but took longer to dry and was harder to peel. My first research in materials science.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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