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Thread: Back when I went to school...

  1. #1
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    Back when I went to school...

    By the third grade... most of the boys carried a knife with three blades and would often play knife games at recess.

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    When I was in the 7th grade, the wood shop class project was everyone had to make a gun rack. In art class, everyone had to make an ash tray. I wonder if those projects are even allowed now, let alone mandatory.

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    Milk break, everyday, from the milk dispenser, right next to the AV room where we watched movies cross-legged on the floor, the teacher assisted by an assigned (and trained) student helper.
    Last edited by grapes; 2012-Apr-25 at 01:51 PM. Reason: Replaced with more appropriate anecdote

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    In the 11th grade, seeing this (especially the ending) was my motivation to work in the space program.
    "There are powers in this universe beyond anything you know. There is much you have to learn. Go to your homes. Go and give thought to the mysteries of the universe. I will leave you now, in peace." --Galaxy Being

  5. #5
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    When I was in elementary school, the school lunches were 45 cents, milk a nickel. On Thursdays, everyone would buy lunch -- chili with a big cinnamon roll.

    And we played warball, aka dodgeball. Great game, but painful at times...

    A shoutout to my 6th grade teacher, Mr. Castleberry -- you were one of the best!

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    I remember the nickel milk, but that's just a normal inflationary "I remember".
    It seems as though some of you live in areas where some things were more common than where I lived.

    I do remember singing Christmas carols including songs from other faiths. Today, even the mention of Christmas is frowned upon.
    The biggest thing that I can think of is that smoking was allowed in our senior lounge.

  7. #7
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    When I was in high school in the year 1965, we played Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture in our band concert with real guns for the cannon parts, using two 30-06 rifles and a 12 gauge shotgun with black powder blanks. The principal, like the band director, was an experienced hunter who knew and trusted the boys who supplied the guns. During a rehearsal a neighbor, startled by the noise along with the smoke and flame from the shotgun, called the police with no adverse consequences. Back then there was no law or regulation against using firearms with suitable blank ammunition for theatrical purposes.

  8. #8
    When I was in high school chemistry class, we were taught to use a slide rule. In 8th grade, the boys took shop and the girls took home ec.

    Nick

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    At my school, there was a staircase leading up about 5 floors with a wide stairwell in the middle. The older boys used to punish the small ones for being cheeky by dangling them by the ankles in this stairwell from the top floor. It was surprising that this irresponsible and dangerous tradition never actually ended in a fatality, which it would have been if they had let go or if some kid's socks and shoes slid off.

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    Do they still allow climbing ropes in the gym? We used to do it hands only, no feet. About 20' to the top.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Theodorakis View Post
    When I was in high school chemistry class, we were taught to use a slide rule. In 8th grade, the boys took shop and the girls took home ec.

    Nick
    I just missed slide rule training; I think if I was a year or two older I would have. In my senior year high school physics (graduated in 1976) we weren't allowed to use calculators because it wasn't fair (not everyone could afford them) but by my freshman year in college (one year later) they were required.

    I took shop in both junior high and high school (metal and wood) and IIRC, there were no girls. But I took typing in high school (my mom told me I'd better learn typing for college) and I was the only boy in the class, but I also got the highest grade.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  12. #12
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    heh - I passed typing in High school by fixing Selectric IIs. I took Home Ec in Junior High, tho, cuz I ate a lot of my own cooking and wanted an improvement - did some sewing as well.

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    We used slide rules in my High School mechanical drawing class...back when such was done with triangles, T-squares, pencils sharpened on sandpaper, and ruling pens filled from a bottle of ink with a dropper.
    Brett's the name. Peters Creek is the place.
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    I had to walk four miles to school in the snow...uphill both ways!

    OK, seriously: Much of the above. Slide rules. Lunch for a quarter, which I paid for with a silver dollar that had to last four days. (Actual silver, this was in Montana.) Boys in shop, girls in home-ec. Climbing ropes in gym. (I couldn't.)
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    I'm too young for much of that stuff. Though school was certainly much different then than it is now. I don't remember all this "bully" fuss, peanut-allergy stuff, kids can't be reprimanded without a parent suing (oh, quite the opposite! Believe me), etc.

    I am from a generation where research papers and class presentations came from books in the library, rather than wikipedia or Google. So that's a thing.

  16. #16
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    When I was in school, the one hour history class only took 30 minutes 'cause there was so much less to cover.

    Math class was easier, too, 'cause really big numbers hadn't been invented yet.
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  17. #17
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    Speaking of shop, the last high school I attended (of three) practiced corporal punishment. The shop teacher was a CP renaissance man who experimented with paddle shapes, thickness, materials, and even the size and pattern of holes drilled in them to increase the sting factor.

    I did enjoy shop, though. One of our projects was to build a slightly scaled down section of a house, complete with electric, plumbing, and HVAC ducting. That (and years of watching This Old House) prepared me nicely for the work I've been doing to my own house.
    Brett's the name. Peters Creek is the place.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    When I was in school, the one hour history class only took 30 minutes 'cause there was so much less to cover.
    We used to get out of 30 minutes of history about once a week, simply by asking about how realistic Hogan's Heros was or why the B-17 was superior to the B-24. . Our teacher was a B-24 pilot during WWII, got shot down and spent almost a year in a luft-stalg. He brought in his card and pin showing his membership in the Caterpillar Club

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
    I don't remember all this "bully" fuss,
    I wish there had been all this bully fuss. I had several bad encounters with bullies in junior high and high school. It was considered something you just had to put up with
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I wish there had been all this bully fuss. I had several bad encounters with bullies in junior high and high school. It was considered something you just had to put up with
    I was lucky enough to fall into that median crowd. Not popular, by any means. Very much a "dork" (go figure, eh?) But old blood -- same school system from K-12 in a moderately small district, so I knew almost everyone and got very little grief from anyone.

    I just don't remember a ton of bullying going on, but it probably did.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I wish there had been all this bully fuss. I had several bad encounters with bullies in junior high and high school. It was considered something you just had to put up with
    I was one of the bullied, but we didn't have people considered bullies. It was just more of a certain people were picked on more than others in general. Even by the teachers.
    It certainly was rough, but I did learn a lot from it, and became one of the "popular" kids in high school.

  22. #22
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    In high school the teachers let us have the run of the physics and chemistry laboratories, just asking us to lock up when we left.

    No one was killed or seriously injured.

  23. #23
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    Fast forward to college. In the late '60s the University of Virginia never shut down for snow. One snowy Saturday morning I walked a mile to my one and only Saturday class, and the professor didn't show up.

    We did most of our number crunching in chemistry and physics with slide rules and log tables. By my senior year we were doing some rudimentary computer programming on punch cards.

    Fast rewind to about 1952 in rural Virginia, where my high school band director (of 1812 fame) was just getting started as a school teacher. A big lug of a student came in and tried to beat him up, as he was notorious for doing with other new teachers. This teacher responded by clouting him with a chair. The next morning the boy's father came in and confronted the teacher.

    Father: "My son says you hit him with a chair."
    Teacher: "Yessir, I did."
    Father: "Why?"
    Teacher: "It was self defense..." and described the onset of the fight.
    Father: "OK, when I get through with him, he won't bother you any more."

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    In the late '60s the University of Virginia never shut down for snow.
    Wuss. University of Virginia! Hah! I attended Montana State University, Bozeman. Elevation 5000 feet, if you were above about the fourth floor of the dorm. In February of my Junior year the temperature never rose above zero degrees, Fahrenheit. There was a solid week below -20F. The lowest overnight temperature at the airport was -53F. No cancellations or changes in class schedules. I did take the battery out of my car and take it into my room for fear it would freeze. My friend's 1961 Falcon kept running the whole time. That was about the ONLY time it kept running.

    There was commonly a little residual snow in the shady spots when school let out for the summer. And I'm not making any of this up!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fazor View Post
    I'm too young for much of that stuff. Though school was certainly much different then than it is now. I don't remember all this "bully" fuss, peanut-allergy stuff, kids can't be reprimanded without a parent suing (oh, quite the opposite! Believe me), etc.

    I am from a generation where research papers and class presentations came from books in the library, rather than wikipedia or Google. So that's a thing.
    A thumb drive was on my daughter's school supply list. They don't even use paper for reports.

  26. #26
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    I remember making ashtrays and seeing a computer that was much bigger than me in Kindergarten. In high school my friends brought .22 caliber guns to school for use in gym class while only had a compound bow and arrows...

    My oldest son uses a Kyros Tablet for homework and reading at school and he can't have plastic knives, even for lunch.
    Solfe

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  27. #27
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    I carried a knife to school and it hung off my belt.
    The only way to call home was go to the principle's office and use the phone and it had to be a real emergency.
    I walked to school in the snow and it was uphill both ways. The school was on one hill and I lived on another hill.
    My sixth grade teacher proudly displayed her paddle.
    You could bring aspirin to school.
    You could play war games at recess.
    We had recess.
    The principle could punish you by making you do odd jobs around the school.
    Your parents punished you worse than the school ever could.
    I had one teacher who was born in 1899.
    There were almost no volumetrically challenged (fat) kids.
    In high school, you could take an archery class in gym.
    Milk was two cents and lunch was 50 cents.
    The food was actually made at the school, not brought in from some central location.
    All of my teachers lived through WWII and most of the men were WWII veterans.

  28. #28
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    I can't believe I forgot this one,

    There were no mandated state/federal testing.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrkeller View Post
    All of my teachers lived through WWII and most of the men were WWII veterans.
    My Latin teacher at school was the first name on the school honours board, which recorded the achievement of getting to university. As a pupil at the school, he got a scholarship and graduated from university in 1912, went straight to war in the trenches, returned to school as a teacher in 1918, and was still there in 1963.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrkeller View Post
    I can't believe I forgot this one,

    There were no mandated state/federal testing.
    You might be a little older than me, or it might be a state thing, but there was in New York. IIRC, there were state-wide tests for high-school Math and English, and for certain other subjects (I remember I just barely passed the Spanish one). As far as I remember, everyone who took that course, had to take the test. But I don't recall any particular consequences for either the student or the school, like they lost funding if the students did reach a certain level.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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