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Thread: A Navy question for BigDon. And another for the submariners here.

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    A Navy question for BigDon. And another for the submariners here.

    First, for Don, the carrier sailor. I got in a discussion over a post on another site over how many O-6's (Captain in the Navy, full Colonel in the other services) there might be on a carrier. This was in response to something about an O-6 who had to hide something (not for discussion in this board!) from the other O-6's on the ship. The specific ship was the USS Abraham Lincoln.

    I questioned how many O-6's there could be, even on a carrier, besides the ship's captain. Someone else chimed in and claimed there'd be lots but was using NATO rank designations, suggesting they may have been from Europe. It turns out the Lincoln's exec is also a Captain by rank. How many others might there be? CO of the Marine detachment? CO of the air wing? CO's of multiple air units?

    For the submariners: I've had this explained to me before but I've gotten myself confused. Is it submarine-er or sub-mariner? I'm thinking the former is what's used in the USN but I saw some RN people on TV lately using the latter.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Treb, I'd answer now but I'm being dragged off to go look for a new mommy for Boo.

    I'll get back to you tomorrow. Have to go shower and shave.

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    Have a good one, Don! Don't do anything I wouldn't do.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    RN is Sub-Mariner
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    I heard it both ways in the USN: sub-mariner and submarine-er. The former sounds more nautical, but if I was to choose one for myself it would be the latter. Ex-submariner-er, that is.

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    Sub-Mariner sounds like a certain prince of Atlantis.

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    Frequently a topic of dissent among us brothers of the dolphin :> I go with submareener - truckers drive trucks

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    I pronounce Sub-mariner as Sub mare in 'er, but submariner as sub mar een, as in keen, 'er.
    Is this wrong?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ravens_cry View Post
    I pronounce Sub-mariner as Sub mare in 'er, but submariner as sub mar een, as in keen, 'er.
    Is this wrong?
    The word to describe a sailor who serves on a submarine, correctly written, is submariner. There are two ways to pronounce that word.

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    Isn't there like the CAG who is in change of pilots who could be a pilot and another Captain in charge of the boat in then there is the admiral who is charge of battle group or fleet the carrier is in? (Sorry if I step on any toes here but it is just a passing thought on what I have seen on many shows about the Navy.)
    ...I'm still free, you can't take the sky from me.

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    I'm not familiar with "CAG" -- Commander of the Air Group? Anyhow, what you say is generally correct. My question was how many officers of O-6 rank there might be on a carrier. The post on the other site I mentioned seemed to suggest there were quite a few. I did find that on the ship in question the Executive Officer is also a Captain (O-6) by rank. I could see how there might be others -- the Air Group commander, perhaps a Marine Colonel, maybe a doctor who is head of the medical staff? I was just hoping Don might know. Hopefully he'll recover soon from his date!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Cag is commander of the air group about the others I wouldn't know.
    ...I'm still free, you can't take the sky from me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm not familiar with "CAG" -- Commander of the Air Group? Anyhow, what you say is generally correct. My question was how many officers of O-6 rank there might be on a carrier. The post on the other site I mentioned seemed to suggest there were quite a few. I did find that on the ship in question the Executive Officer is also a Captain (O-6) by rank. I could see how there might be others -- the Air Group commander, perhaps a Marine Colonel, maybe a doctor who is head of the medical staff? I was just hoping Don might know. Hopefully he'll recover soon from his date!
    BigDon mentioned here that the Chief Surgeon was O-5.
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    I could have sworn I put a multiparagragh reply to this thread in here.

    Which means I put it in some other thread. If anybody finds it, let me know.

    The CAG is a commander, a silver oakleaf to you Airforce and Army types. The CAG is the senior squadron Skipper among the squadron Skippers. (You have to come up with these names when you have "Commander" and "Captain" as both a rank AND as a station.) Skipper just denotes station, in this case the squadron commander.

    Our was the Skipper of one of the A-6 outfits, bomber, not recon. Anybody ever see one of these things fully loaded and ready to get its murder on? Whew! Goodnight Maria!

    These Iranian so and so's hucked a cruise missile at us and got away with it so they fired two more, three days later. From a narrow ravine in a seaside cliff face.

    Six A-6's with 24 CBU's each paid that location a visit roughly twenty minutes later and unloaded on them.

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    As I explained in the lost post, the number of silver eagles, a full Captain to sailors (the full denoting he's not, let's say, a Lt who is in command of a vessel, thus a captain as well.), depends if you are the Flagship or not. If the fleet admiral makes your ship his mobile command post he will have a number of Captains as staff and assistants. Even an extra admiral or two.

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    Ah, thanks Don! I hadn't thought about the Admiral's staff. I suspect that carriers are pretty much always flagships of a task force so that would apply.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Ah, thanks Don! I hadn't thought about the Admiral's staff. I suspect that carriers are pretty much always flagships of a task force so that would apply.
    No, not correct at all.

    Usually the flag remains in one geographic area and as the carriers transit in and out they transfer the flag. We weren't the flagship as we crossd the Pacific nor did we recieve the admiral and his flag until we were west of the tip of India. (Always a good reference point in world travel by ocean. )

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    Oh I misread the tense of that! Sorry!

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    I'd also add that there are occasions where an officer of a different rank than normal serves in a particular position. For example, normally the captain of a submarine is a commander (O-5), but occasionally will be an O-6.

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    I'm going to make a wild guess that less than 10% of the Captains (by rank) in the USN are captains (ships commander) of ships. And conversely, less than 10% of ships' captains are actually Captains by rank.

    Random recollection: Back in 2003, one of my coworkers had a good friend who was the captain (both ways!) of an aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf. He had to give up his command the day before the Iraq war started because he got promoted to Rear Admiral.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm going to make a wild guess that less than 10% of the Captains (by rank) in the USN are captains (ships commander) of ships. And conversely, less than 10% of ships' captains are actually Captains by rank.

    Random recollection: Back in 2003, one of my coworkers had a good friend who was the captain (both ways!) of an aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf. He had to give up his command the day before the Iraq war started because he got promoted to Rear Admiral.
    When the Iowa class battleships were building there was a rear Admiral that said "I want one." The reply was "What, give up your star?" He did.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ravens_cry View Post
    I pronounce Sub-mariner as Sub mare in 'er, but submariner as sub mar een, as in keen, 'er.
    Is this wrong?
    You have it all wrong, it's pronounced Bub bull head.
    Sub mar in 'er is how my fiances said it is pronounced.

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    We don't say skimmer and we don't say bubblehead. It's derogatory and starts fights, see?
    Sleep well tonight. Your Navy is awake.

    Dan
    SS 421

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    It's pronounced:

    Crazy guy in a sunken nuclear tin can.

    Any questions?

    P.s Go Army

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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    We don't say skimmer and we don't say bubblehead. It's derogatory and starts fights, see?
    Sleep well tonight. Your Navy is awake.

    Dan
    SS 421
    I am sorry. I didn't know that it was deragatory.

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    I've never considered bubblehead derogatory, but I've never heard skimmer used in a complimentary fashion... teasing, sometimes between friends...

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    Quote Originally Posted by closetgeek View Post
    Sub mar in 'er is how my fiances said it is pronounced.
    Is the plural intentional? Sequential or concurrent?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Is the plural intentional? Sequential or concurrent?
    It's a French word, they always throw in an unnecessary, silent S.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    We don't say skimmer and we don't say bubblehead. It's derogatory and starts fights, see?
    Sleep well tonight. Your Navy is awake.

    Dan
    SS 421
    That's why I went with "sewer pipe sailor".

    More historically accurate as well. (Early modern metal submarines hulls being made by the folks who made municipal water system fixtures.)

    Who could *possibly* be offended by history? Certainingly not the Submarine Service!

    "Caspers" was another one. (Says the guy from the part of the Navy that has great tans...)



    My senior company commander in bootcamp was ICCS(SS) Pearson.

    Everytime he heard the word submariner we'ed have to do twenty minutes of PT. (Everybody who works on the ocean is a mariner. He was not a submariner.) It was most definately *sub-mareener*.

    I'm having a horrible flashback of repeated sets of jumping jacks, push ups and squat thrusts while the album Breakfast In America played on the radio. Until dust came from the rafters and not just the windows, but the walls sweated.

    Do that a couple nights a month on top of your normally scheduled excercise program and you really develope a Palovian response to the knuckleheads who couldn't get with the program. (Pssst, not a good one.)

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