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Thread: Rust and Energy

  1. #1
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    Rust and Energy

    Naturally when iron, or another metal, oxidizes in air the reaction releases a specific amount of energy. The metal is basically burning very slowly.

    What happens if an oxidizer besides oxygen is used? Say chlorine. Does the iron to iron(III) chloride reaction release more energy than the iron to iron(III) oxide reaction?

    What about aluminum? Or the metalloid boron?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkepticJ View Post
    Naturally when iron, or another metal, oxidizes in air the reaction releases a specific amount of energy. The metal is basically burning very slowly.

    What happens if an oxidizer besides oxygen is used? Say chlorine. Does the iron to iron(III) chloride reaction release more energy than the iron to iron(III) oxide reaction?

    What about aluminum? Or the metalloid boron?
    Skeptic. What you seek are heats of formation (standard enthalpies of the substance. Typically these have been tabulated as how much energy (kilojoules) per mole of product produced....(KJ/mol). You'll have to search the web a bit or use the Handbook of Physics and Chemistry in your library. SEE partly:

    http://chemed.chem.wisc.edu/chempath...ation-551.html pete

  3. #3
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    Yup. Seems to me we had to do that in high school chemistry. I actually bought a CRC handbook then; and used it all the way through college. I bet I still have it. Somewhere.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #4
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    I still have Kaye and Laby on my shelf from school days plus my "new" edition 1978 gives kJ/mol Al2O3 as-1675.7, Fe2O3 -824.2, Fe3O4 -1118.4, FeS2 -178.2 or - 154.8 (magkasite) FeCl2 -341.8,

    and so on for hundreds of compounds.

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