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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #181
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    From 07 May 2012

    There are 47 papers today, not counting replacements. There seemed to be a higher than usual concentration on the topics of Dark Energy and Dark Matter
    Topics: *WHITE DWARF PLANET, RECOILING SMBH, MEGAMASERS*

    *WHITE DWARF PLANET*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0806 GD 66 Is a white dwarf that appears to have a brown dwarf orbiting it at 2 to 3 AU. This study is Hubble-based astrometry making measurements to try and determine what we can discover about the survival of planets during the change from main-sequence through red giant and on to white dwarf.

    *RECOILING SMBH*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0815 In some models SMBHs can recoil after a merger. This paper looks at CID-42, which is a z=~0.4 example that might be a recoiling SMBH.

    *MEGAMASERS*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0823 In this time of precision cosmology, we need better ways than Cepheids and Type 1a SN for determining distances to galaxies in the z=0 region. One cool way that's been around for limited cases is masers from around SMBHs. This paper is about a project to search for as many of these masers as we can find, and get another significant digit in the local Hubble constant.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  2. #182
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 8 May 2012

    CATEGORIES: BIG IDEAS, EXOPLANETS AND NONPLANETS, PANSPERMIA, SPORTS

    This week's collection has a lot of far out ideas. These include ideas for revolutionizing science and cosmology, as well as theories about exotic quark objects, limited interstellar lithopanspermia, and an atom-sized heat engine.

    Quite a grab bag of scientific ideas! No silly whimsical entries this time, though.

    ---

    BIG IDEAS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1055 - Scientific Utopia: I. Opening scientific communication

    This ambitious proposal identifies deficiencies in the current way scientific communication is done and proposes six changes made possible using modern technology. These changes include open access to all published research and allowing open continuous peer review. For non-scientists like me, the summary of the existing publishing process is illuminating. The audacious proposals and discussion of the critical barriers should be of interest to anyone, I'd think.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1407 - Artificial Cosmogenesis: A New Kind of Cosmology

    This paper discusses cosmological issues assuming that universes with different parameters are possible or exist. The basic concept is to extend the Drake equation with a factor for a universe's number of galaxies. Of course, my attitude is that the Drake equation is a silly thing, and I generally have a lot of reservations about this paper. Nevertheless, it's fun to read and think about.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1362 - Single ion heat engine with maximum efficiency at maximum power

    This proposed Otto cycle heat engine uses a single ion in a linear trap. I doubt you're going to have any practical heat engines with a piston much smaller than that.

    ---

    EXOPLANETS AND NONPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1410 - The nature of the companion of PSR J1719-1438: a white dwarf or an exotic object?

    This short and sweet paper suggests something which sounds rather shocking to me. The author suggests that the Jupiter-mass object orbiting PSR J1719-1438 is an exotic quark object rather than a white dwarf remnant (the current theory).


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1058 - A FALSE POSITIVE FOR OCEAN GLINT ON EXOPLANETS: THE LATITUDE-ALBEDO EFFECT

    As the title says, this paper identifies and studies a potential false positive for ocean glint, which is theorized to increase apparent albedo of a planet at crescent phases. Ocean glint detection is, of course, of interest because it's a potential method to detect surface liquid water on an exoplanet. With this false positive, it may be difficult to definitively conclude ocean glint.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1341 - Testing a hypothesis of the nu Octantis planetary system

    This paper studies the likelyhood of the putative Jovian planet in the compact binary system of nu Octantis. They find stable best fit solutions which are retrograde, but in very small stable regions. This paper includes a lot of pretty phase space pictures.

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    PANSPERMIA

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1059 - Chaotic exchange of solid material between planetary systems: implications for lithopanspermia

    This paper studies the possibility of interstellar lithopanspermia in the context of a dense star cluster. They find that it may be possible, via weak escape and capture, if life had an early start.

    My thought about this is that this possibility may result in a previously ignored bias effect in favor of seeing life occur earlier in Earth's history. In other words, maybe abiogenesis is more rare than we expect, but we're still more likely to see life early because an early abiogenesis event results in many planets being populated early--not just one planet in a star system too isolated to propogate via lithopanspermia.

    Regardless of my personal speculations, this paper is obviously of interest to astrobiology enthusiasts.

    ---

    SPORTS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1299 - Traveling Baseball Players’ Problem in Korea

    This paper studies an interesting variation on the traveling salesman problem. This problem considers 8 baseball teams which travel around for a tournament; the goal is to minimize the unfairness of travel distance rather than minimizing the total travel distance. In other words, it's more important that the teams travel roughly equal distances even if the total sum of travel distances may be increased. The result is a nice little study which feels fresh compared to minor TSP variants, and with a fun practical side.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1492 - Can Timeouts Change the Outcome of Basketball Games?

    The short answer, apparently, is no. They find that contrary to popular belief, timeouts have no significant effect on the final outcomes of games. Even if you don't care about sports, you may be amused by their discussion of the implications on strategic timeouts in the workplace.

  3. #183
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    From 09 May 2012

    There are 50 papers today, not counting replacements. I was skimming them with more than my usual distractions, but they seemed to be more theory and less observation than usual. Speculations anout Dark Energy, etc.
    Topics: *SOLAR INTERIOR, MINIMUM MASS GALAXIES, GALAXY MERGING, DARK MATTER*

    *SOLAR INTERIOR*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1530 We have a pretty good idea of what goes on inside the Sun, but we know that when we consider the details, there is a lot to learn. This paper looks at what we can tell about convection in the outer 30 percent (as measured by radius, not voulme or mass) of the Sun. Note that this is merely a place where heat is getting transported by various mechanisms, and is still very far from where the fusion is happening.

    *MINIMUM MASS GALAXIES*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1537 Back in the day, small galaxies formed, and many of them probably merged and became bigger galaxies. There are a lot of things about that process that we don't quite have worked out yet, and a lot of our models of the early universe, and hence the current universe will be improved by getting this right. Observations will come, but they are probably ten to twenty years away. In the mean time, we have simulations. This one takes self-gravitation of baryonic matter into account, and calculates the minimum size and mass of initial galaxies based on gas temperature and rotation.

    *GALAXY MERGING*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1588 So another aspect of that is looking at the merging that is actually happening. This paper looks back from now back to z ~1.5 to see galaxy pairs, and measure the environmental situations that result in merging (or not).

    *ANOTHER DARK MATTER CANDIDATE*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1520 I've mentioned the 130 GeV line that has been observed by FERMI a few times. I also noted a paper covering 130 GeV Muons observed in Gran Sasso. It's a pretty hot topic these days. There is a lot of speculation as to what it might be. This paper speculated that it could be the result of interactions of high energy stuff coming out of Sgr A* hitting surrounding Dark Matter. In this proposal, they are speculating that a combination of Z gauge bosons are facilitating interactions with a 144.5 GeV Dark Particle from a U'(1) abelian group (i.e. not the neutralino). We're a long way from making this speculation solid, but if this path works out, that will tell us a lot about which flavors of String Theory to keep working on, and about the nature of our universe.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  4. #184
    Quote Originally Posted by IsaacKuo View Post
    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 24 Apr 2012

    ...

    GEOMETRY

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4896 - Selective sweeps in growing microbial colonies

    This paper is about the geometry of competing microbes growing with different competitive advantages. Among other things, it's possible to estimate the competitive advantage of a faster growing strain from snapshots. This paper includes lots of nice pictures, including geometrical pictures, simulations, and experimental photos. While this paper is about microbes on a petri dish, I can't help but envision applying this to aliens colonizing a galaxy (especially robotic VN machines).
    Isaac et al.,

    You might enjoy David Nelson's colloquium lecture presented to the Harvard Physics department with the playful title: Gene surfing and the survival of the luckiest.

    http://media.physics.harvard.edu/vid..._NELSON_050310

  5. #185
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    There were 76 papers today and of those there e were 42 new, 7 cross posted, leaving 25 replacements. There were several papers on dust or gas. Ranging from emission, star formation, dissipation, disk formation, absorption lines in galaxies, and just plain old extinction. Interestingly, (considering antoniseb's post specifically stating not the neutralino) there were two papers on Neutralinos. Both on how the galatic center may provide enough energy to produce a signal for detection. They are looking at it a bit differently. A couple on spectral analysis, and finally, three on radio emission. One on AGN, one on clusters, and one on shock accelerations. As always, those who want to check out other papers can find them here


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1799 Asymmetric velocity anisotropies in remnants of collisionless mergers
    Martin Sparre, Steen H. Hansen

    Having recently been in a discussion about collisionless vs a collisional fluid, this paper kind of jumped out at me.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2064 Statistical Methods for Astronomy
    Eric D. Feigelson, G. Jogesh Babu

    This paper is a must read for many of those who post here. Many of the methods used in Astronomy are either straight statistical or have probabilities built into the analysis. If you don’t understand statistics or probability, as it pertains to astronomy, this paper will take you by the hand and walk you through it.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1800 Deep Silicate absorption features in Compton-thick AGN predominantly arise due to dust in the host galaxy
    D. Goulding, D. M. Alexander, F. E. Bauer, W. R. Forman, R. C. Hickox, C. Jones, J. R. Mullaney, M. Trichas

    Again, this one jumped out at my, simply because I was involved in another thread, discussing this very thing. It’s really a lot of fun to find papers that discuss the very thing you’ve been discussing in other threads.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2010 The Great Eruption of Eta Carinae
    Kris Davidson, Roberta Humphreys

    This one was rather interesting as it is a reply to paper that will appear in Nature. It appears that Nature is giving the authors a chance to respond, as the paper they are responding to, doesn’t use their actual calculated figures, found in the equations, just the rough estimates in the text of the paper.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.1808 A Population of Dust-Rich Quasars at z ~ 1.5
    Sophia Dai et al.

    This paper reports on the detection of 32 ultra or hyper luminous infrared quasars. These objects are part of a sample of 326 quasars in the Lockman Hole Field. These were detected in the far infrared (FIR) usually indicate a dust rich quasar. However, it has been noted that the FIR luminosity drops off, as the Near Infrared luminosity increases.

  6. #186
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    53 new entries tonight, including cross-listings. This one is fun:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2316 The Near-IR Background Intensity and Anisotropies During The Epoch of Reionization Looking for the smoking gun of the Big Bang in the Near-IR background, the authors conclude the signature we are seeing is many times too bright; and is more likely more galaxies hanging out at very high redshift. (Ok, they don't draw that conclusion, but I can.) In any and all cases, it is another great puzzle.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2173 First results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope
    This is a bit more exhaustive treatment than earlier papers, and it has to be discouraging: No cosmic neutrinos...yet.
    Sure we learn from null results, but it would be nice to have something to show for such a major project - where are those dang cosmic rays coming from, and why can't we find the associated neutrinos?. I am hoping there will be something in a years worth of data, and I would settle for a Lorenze violation!

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2216 Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts during LIGO science run 6 and Virgo science runs 2 and 3 I think the deal is, if you have driven a truckload of dirt to backfill the LIGO tunnels, you get your name included on the paper - kinda like the movie credits. Unfortunately the science is looking like sequels: We can't detect gravitational waves from pairs spinning down or gamma ray emitters...yet. Anyone care to place odds on Advance Ligo; which premiers in 2015?


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2233 Is the observed high-frequency radio luminosity distribution of QSOs bimodal?
    This argument has been raging for decades and it probably isn't over yet, but this is the best line I have seen on a continuum, rather than a bimodal distribution (radio loud and radio quiet) Quasars. It looks like it comes down to frequency ranges, geometry, and detection limits.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2305 Pulsar Spin--Velocity Alignment: Further Results and Discussion This is one of those curious who'd-thunk-that? results that has a tentative model: It appears the proper motion of pulsars is proportional to the spin rate - as if the pulsar is being accelerated along a plane of some kind by its angular momentum...or visa versa. It turns out there is a 'rocket' model that predicts this correlation.
    Last edited by Jerry; 2012-May-11 at 04:57 PM. Reason: grammer

  7. #187
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    From 14 May 2012

    There are 52 papers today, not counting replacements. Generally an interesting batch, but no one topic stood out as over-represented.
    Topics: *ACT-SZ, Lockman Hole at 1.1mm, Energy/Luminosity in S-GRBs, DD v. CD in SN1a, 130 GeV*

    *ACT-SZ*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2369 Planck and the Atacama Cosmological Telescope were both used to look for the SZ effect from distant clusters, some located with xrays, and some with visual-wavelength observations. While they agree about the SZ effect for the xray clusters, they disagree by a factor of about ten on the SZ flux from the other systems. This paper looks for reasons... including some interesting possibilities about the structure of clusters.

    *Lockman Hole at 1.1mm*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2370 The Lockman Hole is a rare clear view out of the galaxy in the wavelengths dominated by cold dust. This paper looks at mm wavelegth observations of galaxies out to z=4.5 looking through the hole. (BTW, the paper is 56 pages, but the last 40 pages are images and other appendicies.) The galaxies being observed are massive star-forming galaxies, whose properties are being studied, but not fully known.

    *Energy/Luminosity in S-GRBs*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2411 What is the rest frame peak energy of photons coming from GRBs? Does it vary? This paper looks at the correlation between Peak Energy and Peak Luminosity for long and short GRBs... and finds a widely scattered, but definitely present relationship... (note only 17 SHort GRBs had enough red-shift data to determine rest energies and luminosities). As a side note: the peak energies varied from 100 KeV to 10 MeV... somehow I expected higher.

    *DD v. CD in SN1a*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2452 This is just a simulation, but it looked at the frequencies of two white dwarfs merging (double degenerate) vs. a white dwarf getting critical mass from a host (core degenerate), and finds that DD should account for about 99% of the SN1a's that we see.

    *130 GeV*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2688 Once again, the hot topic of the 130 GeV observations from the center of the galaxy. I *want* to know what this line is. In this paper, the author proposes another dark matter explanation, which if correct, should start being observed with XENON100, and other such projects *very* soon.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  8. #188
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 15 May 2012

    CATEGORIES: COSMOLOGY, SUPERSCIENCE, EXOPLANETS

    Normally I don't include cosmology papers since I don't really understand cosmology very deeply. But this week, there were a few which got my attention.

    ---

    COSMOLOGY

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2713 - The Cosmic Spacetime - Fulvio Melia

    This paper claims a shockingly simple cosmology model where the universe's gravitational radius at any point in space-time is equal to ct. Melia argues this as a consequence of combining the cosmological principle with the Weyl postulate.

    Is this some wacko far out idea? Or is it consistent with mainstream cosmology? I don't grok cosmology, so I wouldn't know. Still, this paper doesn't raise red flags that are obvious to me, and it's fun to read. Lots of nice graphs, too.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2720 - Why there is something rather than nothing - PeterLynds

    This wall of text is horrible philosophical navel gazing. I only decided to include this paper to highlight the contrast with the previous paper, which is wonderful. Take a brief look at this paper if you want something to increase your appreciation of the above papers and/or you want something to throw at the wall.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2675 - Quantum Mechanics, Gravity, and the Multiverse

    This paper presents a theory that claims to unify the concepts of the many worlds interpretation with an eternally inflating multiverse. I don't grok either cosmology or quantum mechanics, so the math goes over my head. Nevertheless, this paper includes some intuitive seeming pictures, so it at least gives people like me a taste of what it's going on about.

    ---

    SUPERSCIENCE

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3087 - HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE COLLIDERS: PAST 20 YEARS, NEXT 20 YEARS AND BEYOND

    This paper about particle colliders includes some things which really caught my eye. One was a 1954 picture by Enrico Fermi of an "globaltron" circling the Earth (spoiler - not going to happen, for budget reasons). There were also a discussion of potential future technologies, including a picture of a linear X-ray crystal muon collider.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2957 - Space-quality data from balloon-borne telescopes: the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO)

    This paper is about an interesting balloon-borne telescope design with particular attention to precision pointing suitable for weak lensing study. I can't help but wonder about the potential applications pointing the other way...

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2765 - The Anglo-Australian Planet Search. XXII. Two New Multi-Planet Systems

    This dense paper is about two new planets detected in systems already known to host a planet. The previously known planets were thought to have moderate eccentricity, but this study finds that they actually have lower eccentricity and the balance is the effect of another planet.

    The paper's a nice read if you're interested in the radial method.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3030 - Rapid growth of gas-giant cores by pebble accretion

    This paper uses simulations to demonstrate pebble accretion as a method of rapid gas giant formation. It's dense, but it also has nice pictures and graphs.

  9. #189
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    From 16 May 2012

    There are 64 papers today, not counting replacements. This batch had quite a few that caught my interest, but I managed to pare the list down to seven.
    Topics: *IGM since z=7, Retrograde Black Hole, Dwarf Elliptical Creation, Finding Black Hole Mass, Circumstellar Disk, Local Dark Gas, Before Reionization with LOFAR*

    *IGM since z=7*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3161 When did ionization happen? Some LCDM models say about z=10-12, but recent z=7.1 quasar measurements suggest it wasn't complete until sometime between z=7 and z=6.5. This team found a bright galaxy at z=6.95 and got some time with a great spectrograph to get a look at another source to confirm/refute late reionization. A deeper look once the 30 meter telescopes come on line will help resolve this further.

    *Retrograde Black Hole*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3175 A few months ago, I spotted a paper about the difference between black holes spinning in the same v. opposite directions as their disks. This study looks at 3C120, and shows that its disk matches the opposite spin scenario.

    *Dwarf Elliptical Creation*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3176 By far the most common type of galaxy is the Dwarf Elliptical. Did all dE galaxies get created the same way? This paper looks at at the dE galaxies in the Virgo cluster and compares them based on metalicity, and on factors connected to their globular clusters (or lack of GCs in some cases) to try and determine which dEs were created as dE long ago, and which are galaxies that had their gas stripped by M87.

    *Finding Black Hole Mass*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3224 One method of looking for the mass of a quasar black hole is to look at the line width of certain ultraviolet lines, assuming that the hottest gasses will be in the inner most part of the disk. Hydrogen and Magnesium lines are usually used, and get agreement within about 10% as to black hole mass. This paper looks at other lines hoping to find a better one... and has interesting (if not intended) results with triply ionized Carbon... not because it does the job, but becuase it reveals a split in types of quasars (implications unknown).

    *Circumstellar Disk*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3302 HH80 is an 8 solar mass protostar with a dusty disk and shooting jets out of its poles. This study used the Submillimeter Array, and the VLA to resolve the disk and jets to new levels of detail. Personally, I keep hoping that we'll see some time-varying planet formation process in places like this, but that's an unrealistic hope, and this study didn't show it. But it DID give us a lot of information about accretion rates, and the mass and temperature of the disk, and other important precursors to what I do eventually want to see.

    *Local Dark Gas*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3384 Some Dark-Matter dislikers have been trying to make the case for neutral H2 gas as the hidden matter. This paper uses both gamma and infrared data to examine the solar neighborhood to quantify how much of this there is out there, and for the first time (using this method), gets a number... showing that about 30% of the mass of the ISM near us (if I read the paper correctly) is cold H2 gas. This number agrees with estimates of the same from Planck. So, this can account for a large chunk of the missing normal matter, but not of the missing (non-baryonic) mass.

    *Before Reionization with LOFAR*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3449 I've mentioned papers on this previously. The SKA will be used to look at this in a decade. LOFAR can look at this now. The idea is that we'd like to see the map of neutral Hydrogen from z=12 to z=7 as the Epoch of Reionization happens. These instruments can do that job... maybe. This paper is really about what we should expect to see, and what will get in the way of us seeing it. Nice charts and graphs make a lot of concepts clear.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  10. #190
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    Papers for 17 May 2012. I selected a small number of the roughly 86 papers. Most involve asteroids or exoplanets, but the extragalactic folk will see a couple of items, too.

    First, the record setter: Precision Measurement of The Most Distant Spectroscopically-Confirmed Supernova Ia with the Hubble Space Telescope. It's a type Ia with a spectrum at z=1.7 ... and it's pretty much what you'd expect. That's good.

    Next, the planet papers. The frequency of giant planets around metal-poor stars confirms that certain planets are more common around stars with metallicty [Fe/H] > -0.7. A Second Giant Planet in 3:2 Mean-Motion Resonance in the HD 204313 System uses radial-velocity measurements of a star with two previously-know planets to reveal the presence of a third planet. As the title suggests, the new planet is in a resonance with one of the others.

    Asteroids, near and far. In our own solar system, Characterizing Subpopulations within the Near Earth Objects with NEOWISE: Preliminary Results describes how measurements made by the WISE infrared satellite give us the sizes of many asteroids in near-Earth orbits. The authors estimate that there may be 3000-6000 objects with diameters (?) larger than 100m which might be classified as Potentially Hazardous Asteroids. Most definitely NOT in our own solar system are the unfortunate objects described in Detection of Weak Circumstellar Gas around the DAZ White Dwarf WD 1124-293: Evidence for the Accretion of Multiple Asteroids. Absorption lines due to Ca II ions in the spectrum of this compact star are attributed to material from asteroids which recently came too close to the white dwarf and were torn apart.

    Lonely Hearts Club members will want to read Discovery of the most isolated globular cluster in the local universe, which discusses two very antisocial clusters in the M81 group. They are much larger than most globular clusters, likely due to the lack of any tidal stripping.

    The last paper discusses The Inter-Eruption Timescale of Classical Novae from Expansion of the Z Camelopardalis Shell. A shell around this star may have been created by an outburst by Chinese astronomers in 77 BC, although we can't QUITE confirm that hypothesis yet. In a few more years, though, astrometric studies may be able to test the idea.

  11. #191
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    Papers for Friday, May 18

    Stellar Crack-the-Whip?

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3783 Cosmic Rays and Stochastic Magnetic Reconnection in the Heliotail
    Is there a cosmic ray excess in the heliotail?

    Care for a mystery you never heard of?

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3788
    IDCS J1426.5+3508: Cosmological implications of a massive, strong lensing cluster at Z = 1.75Ok, some of you may have, but I have never heard of the 'giant arc problem' - I would have guessed it has something to do with dust lanes in the Milky Way, not 'exacerbating' tension between lensing and space.

    What's bigger than a Texas Tornado?

    A solar 'turnado: http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.3819 A solar tornado observed by AIA/SDO: Rotational flow and evolution of magnetic helicity in a prominence and cavity I have to wonder: have they observed any round cows?


    more later...

  12. #192
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    From 21 May, 2012

    There are 35 papers today, not counting replacements. In spite of the small number, there were six I mention here. Today's batch seemed to have a heavier concentration of papers on phenonena at high red shift than usual, and not much else.
    Topics: *No Local Dark Matter Rebuttle, Astroseismology, Merging Galaxies at z=4.4, Luminosity at z-9, Fusion and Tides, 130 GeV*

    *No Local Dark Matter Rebuttle*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4033 You may remember a paper a few weeks ago about measuring the velocities of stars and calculating that there was little dark matter in the galactic region including the Sun? This paper reveals a bad assumption the first paper made, redoes the calculation, and gets the expected amount of dark matter here... and between the two studies provides the best measurement of dark matter distribution in our galaxy so far.

    *Astroseismology*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4023 Kepler has been a really cool mission, and we mostly know about it because of the exoplanet finding part of its mission. This study used Kepler to look at stars in four open clusters (so, young hot stars), and study their oscillation modes to determine things about their interiors. The results are relatively technical, but it comes with some interesting graphs.

    *Merging Galaxies at z=4.4*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4035 This team looked at a lensed quasar at z=4.4, and studies the singly ionized Carbon lines (which are usually indicators of star formation) and mapped the region around the Quasar, finding what appears to be two galaxies merging, and having a rapid star formation period.

    *Luminosity at z-9*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4187 How bright are the brightest galaxies at z=9? Two main things affect that number: how much star formation is going on, and is that before reionization completed. This team used the VLT to look at galaxies behind a lensing cluster, to look for galaxies that appear in the K band of infrared, but not the J band ... which would be z=~9. They didn't find any which puts some constraints on maximum brightness of z=9 galaxies. *Side Note*: If star forming is very rapid at that time, I'd expect some brightness from multiple supernovae as well, but that didn't seem to be factored in.

    *Fusion and Tides*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4061 Does the position of the planets (Jupiter and Saturn mostly) affect tides within the Sun's core resulting in changes in the rate of fusion? This paper looks at sunspot numbers and solar irradiance numbers from a satellite. I'm not sure why he doesn't look at neutrino counts, as they're the only direct measure we've got, and the time it takes energy to get from the core to the photosphere is *very* long.

    *130 GeV*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4151 Another team looks at this line, and proposes another kind of dark matter. In this case scalar dark matter.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  13. #193
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 22 May 2012

    CATEGORIES: BIG IDEAS, STARS AND GALAXIES, PLANETS, MISC

    This week includes a couple competing papers on revolutionizing scientific publishing--or not. There's also a paper on MMOG social differences between males and females.

    ---

    BIG IDEAS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4251 - Scientific Utopia: II. Restructuring incentives and practices to promote truth over publishability

    This is a sequel to a paper I reviewed earlier, and it continues the authors's discussion of problems with the current paradigm for publishing scientific papers and audacious ideas for how to replace it with something superior. This one discusses the unfortunate bias toward novel false positives and against the sort of direct replication which could help weed out false positives. This very readable paper includes nice concrete examples and thought provoking proposals.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4304 - In praise of the referee

    This paper defends the current paradigm of pre-publication peer review. While not as "fun" as promoting radical new ideas, it provides a nice counterpoint. Also, there is a particularly fun paragraph where the authors self-consciously thank the peer reviewers in advance--an indirect ironic nod to the fact that the paper is on arXiv.

    Another fun point for my fellow arXiv followers is their commentary on the relative impossibility of keeping up with arXiv.

    ---

    STARS AND GALAXIES

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4307 - Modeling the Spatial Distribution of Neutron Stars in the Galaxy

    The title says it all. This paper features nice pictures and graphs of the distribution of old neutron stars in our galaxy.

    ---

    PLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4453 - Baroclinic Instability on Hot Extrasolar Planets

    This study simulates weather of hot exoplanets. It includes a lot of nice pictures and graphs.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4615 - IMPACT CRATERING ON MERCURY: CONSEQUENCES FOR THE SPIN EVOLUTION

    This short paper simulates the history of Mercury's secular evolution and asteroid impacts to reproduce primordial synchronous rotation and current 3/2 resonance. Obviously, this paper is of interest to anyone keeping up with the latest on Mercury.

    ---

    MISC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4683 - How women organize social networks different from men

    This study uses an MMOG to investigate the differing social interactions for female and male players (actually based on the gender of the characters; they ignore the issue of gender swapping). Even though the title of this paper does not mention online gaming, this paper is clearly most relevant to those interested in MMOs.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4502 - Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with Fresnel Zone Plate beyond the expected resolution

    This paper discusses an unexpected result from a fresnel zone plate which provides twice the expected resolution at a particular wavelength. The paper discusses the manufacture and geometry of the zone plate, and considers possible reasons for the unexpected resolution. I'm generally interested in fresnzel zone plates for focusing x-rays, although my specific interest has to do with a radically different application (extremely long range focusing of X-ray lasers in space for laser sail propulsion).
    Last edited by IsaacKuo; 2012-May-23 at 10:42 AM.

  14. #194
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    From 23 May 2012

    There are 59 papers today, not counting replacements. It seemed to me to be covering a broad range of topics with no special concentration in one area.
    Topics: *Microlensing, LOFAR, Dark Matter, Anti-protons, 130 GeV*

    *Novel Microlensing Idea*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4724 OGLE and MACHO have been looking at the LMC for a long time to observe microlensing events... and some of the events seem to defy explanation until now. Besla and Loeb point out that the observed phenonema can be explained by a batch of stars stripped from previous LMC SMC interactions.

    *LOFAR*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4730 This paper has some cool images from long wavelength radio (18-153 MHz) observations of cluster Abell 2256 (an old favorite). Some speculation about the meaning of the observations (this is new stuff, so it's pretty open) is given.

    *Dark Matter Summary*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4882 This paper is an interesting state-of-the-science paper covering a list of Dark Matter candidates, and what it should take to detect them, listing current experiments... as we see it today. This includes insights about the 130 GeV line.

    *Anti-protons*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5007 PAMELA is detecting anti-protons (that's not news, its what it was built for). This paper looks at the energy spectrum and abundances of anti-protons compared with protons, and speculates about the sources (most of the time, cosmic-ray protons hitting alpha particles in the ISM).

    *130 GeV Line(s)*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4723 This paper looks at the FERMI 130 GeV line and speculates as to whether it is a single line, or two close lines, and gives suggested meanings in both cases.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  15. #195
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    I found a real mix today, with something for everyone: colliding asteroids, MOND vs. gravitational lensing, a really, really, REALLY hot planet, and more!

    For those who like STARS, we have

    The Origin of the Microlensing Events Observed Towards the LMC and the Stellar Counterpart of the Magellanic Stream, which suggests that some (or all) of the stellar microlensing observed toward the LMC was actually due to sources located _behind_ the LMC, in a group of stars pulled out of the LMC by gravitational interactions with the SMC some time ago. The locations and motions and motions of these stars might explain the observed features of the microlensing observations better than fits to stars in the LMC proper.
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4724

    The AstraLux Large M-dwarf Multiplicity Survey uses Lucky Imaging (yes, that's what it's called) to search for companions to low-mass stars. It finds quite a few. Read it to learn what Lucky Imaging is -- I suspect a few readers might discover that they are doing it themselves.
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4718

    Next, we turn to PLANETS.

    P/2006 VW139: A Main-Belt Comet Born in an Asteroid Collision? discusses a family of planets -- minor planets, that is -- which share similar orbits in our own solar system. The paper postulates that 11 of these objects were formed in a collision which occurred about 7.5 million years ago. One of the objects is currently called a "comet" by those pesky creatures who weren't around to see the collision.
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4949

    People who are hard-core instrumental junkies will rejoice to see Probing the extreme planetary atmosphere of WASP-12b, which describes observations -- spectral and photometric -- of a really hot Jupiter. The authors go into great detail describing the challenges of working with tiny signals in the presence of high backgrounds. Note the 52-page appendix, for example. If you take exoplanet science seriously, you ought to skim the figures in this paper, just to see the challenges anyone working in this field must face.
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4736

    Carrying on in a nerdly vein, it seems appropriate to mention Period Analysis using the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (Lasso). No, it's not about planets -- the ostensible subject is variable stars -- but it does focus on a technical discussion of data; this time, it's the analysis, not the data reduction, which is the main topic. The authors suggest a novel (for astronomers) method for finding the best fit to a periodic time-varying signal. This is, of course, a subject of great interest to many astronomers and scientists, so any new idea can help a lot of people. I'm hoping that I'll learn something new (and perhaps related to Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods?) by reading this myself.
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4791

    Last on the list, but not least, are papers on COSMOLOGY.

    One of the major challenges in cosmology is measuring distances which are both accurate and precise to galaxies beyond our Milky Way. One of the most promising techniques developed in recent years involves very precise measurements of the motions of masers swirling around supermassive black holes. The Megamaser Cosmology Project has announced the latest in their series of distance estimates, in Mrk 1419 - a new distance determination. Due to some complex geometry, this distance is not as precise as usual -- "only" 81 +/- 10 Mpc -- but there are ways that it might be improved in the future. I always look forward to hearing from the MCP: their project announces new results only slowly, but they are worth the wait!
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4758

    Confronting MOND and TeVeS with strong gravitational lensing over galactic scales: an extended survey uses several galaxy clusters exhibiting strong gravitational lensing to test standard cosmological models against two not-so-standard models. It finds that in some cases, the standard model is the best bet. It's good to see that there are ways to make these tests.
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.4880

  16. #196
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    From 24 May 2012

    Thanks to StudendousMan for filling in... though it looks like he reported from Wednesday's papers not Thursday's. So here are a few more.

    There are 42 papers today (Thursday), not counting replacements. Today's collection had more than the usual number of outside-the-box papers by some known non-mainstream thinkers.

    Topics: *Cosmic Magnetism, Circumgalactic Matter, Integrated Sachs-Wolfe, Hydrogen Bridge*

    *Cosmic Magnetism Upper Bound*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5031 How much cosmic magnetism (relic of inflation) is there? One recent paper gave a lower bound based on gamma spectra. This paper takes those values and places upper bounds on inflation energy... and shows how Gravitational Waves (when/if detected) will let us refine that value.

    *Circumgalactic Matter*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5037 There is missing matter, and missing mass. The missing mass we attribute to Dark Matter, and that is not the topic here. The missing baryonic matter in our galaxy *might* be explainable based on Chandra xray measurements of Hydrogen plasma at about a million degrees surrounding our galaxy.

    *Integrated Sachs-Wolfe, SN, & the CMB*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5139 I don't know how seriously to take this, but I will give it a more detailed look when I get a chance. This paper shows a correlation between supernova redshift and the CMB background temperature behind it. The authors mention three possibilites of the cause, one of which is the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Looking at the graphs, this is clearly at the margin of statistical significance as compared to surety against systematic errors.

    *Hydrogen Bridge M31 & M33 (not)*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5235 Is there a bridge of neutral Hydrogen extending from M31 to M33? The Green Bank Telescope was used to confirm, and shows that there is a 120 kPc wing of neutral Hydrogen (as measured in 21 cm) in that general direction, but it is probably from interactions with the dwarf galaxies right around M31.
    Forming opinions as we speak

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    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5268The gap closes: a new scenario for the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries with gaseous disks I usually like papers that make predictions about what the next generation of telescopes will capture...and they are usually wrong. This one predicts what LISA will identify in supermassive black holes.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5550 The Static Quantum Multiverse I mention this paper because multiverses are a hot topic right now. I don't like the topic - since virtually by definition, there is no way to prove or disprove the existance of multiverses. I think we should leave heaven and hell to theologins.

    http://arxiv.org/find/astro-ph/1/au:.../0/1/0/all/0/1 Half a Century of Kinetic Solar Wind Models
    Historical overviews are always fun. Lemaire is always a good techical read.

    Astrometric paper of the day:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5507 Correlated and zonal errors of global astrometric missions: a spherical harmonic solution Using spherical harmonics to characterize error margins is an interesting approach. Even though the spectrum developed is difficult to interpret, it is a great way to look for odd-ball stuff. The downside is that while using harmonic solutions can help tune out errors, they can also filter what might otherwise be useful information.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5497 http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5496 MIUSCAT: extended MILES spectral coverage. I&II. Constraints from optical photometry I get to be nervous with this model because any model that is better adapted to distant observations that local observations might be oversimplifying something very important.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5273 Circumbinary Chaos: Using Pluto's Newest Moon to Constrain the Masses of Nix & Hydra That's a lot of moons for a dwarf planet. We only get one...perhaps we should rank planet status on the number of moons...because size isn't everything.

  18. #198
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    *For 28 May 2012*

    There are 55 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements. Today's collection had several papers in a series about water on the Moon, as well as a relatively even distribution of other topics.

    Topics: *Cluster Formation, Cosmic Structure, H2, Kepler Spectra, Crab Elements, CTAs and hi-res, Stars in Filaments, 130 GeV*

    *Cluster Formation* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5556 Want to see comparisons for how different cosmological models predict the formation of Galaxy clusters, and compare that to what we've actually observed... including lots of images and graphs? This might be your paper. Standard Cosmology, some modified gravity cosmologies. There's a lot here. Standard cosmology looks pretty good.

    *Cosmic Structure* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5560 This paper uses data from the 2 Micron all-sky Redshift Survey and produces information about the structure and dynamics (motion) in the "local" (half a billion lightyears) universe. I'm not sure if this breaks new ground, but the charts and graphs add some new clarity.

    *H2* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5567 Some subset of people who don't like the idea of non-Baryonic Dark Matter WIMPs have latched on to the idea of molecular Hydrogen (H2) as a form of baryonic matter that can explain things. I selected this paper because it puts some constraints and consequences on the amount of H2 that could be out there based (among other things) on the kind of star-forming we should be seeing in the local universe.

    *Kepler Spectra* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5642 I really like the Kepler Probe. It has returned lots of great results in many fields of astronomy, most famously in exoplanet-finding, but also in astroseismology. This paper points out that certain results from Kepler's spectrometers are not to be trusted as precise. In particular it looks at the metalicity of 82 red giants in its field of view, both as measured by Kepler, and independently from ground-based instruments.

    *Crab Elements* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5737 I've seen this kind of paper in the past, but it is nice to see it with more precise imaging. Where are the various elements in the Crab Nebula? ... and what does it say about the state of the progenitor star at the moment of explosion? Another paper with great images.

    *CTAs and hi-res* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5743 Cherenkov Telescope Arrays are normally used for looking for high-energy cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere... but this paper shows how they can be used as "Stellar Intensity Interferometers" (SIIs) to produce sub-milliarcsecond images of stellar surfaces. Simulated images are presented.

    *Stars in Filaments* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5750 A subset of Young Earth Creationists are the post-Velikovsky "Electric Universe" or "Plasma Cosmology" people. Any time they see the word Filament in a paper title, or graph caption, they start talking like it is proof that all of mainstream since is wrong, and that this feature is just like something you'd see in a tokomak. But filamentary structures do form from the influence of gravity and collapsing or interacting dust and gas clouds. This paper shows some current evidence of this. Nice clearly written paper.

    *130 GeV* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5789 The 130 GeV feature is looking more and more real, and anyone with a theory about Dark Matter, or Standard Model extensions, has some skin in this game... so we are seeing a lot of papers showing why one model is not eliminated as a possibility, and perhaps others are. This looks at Wino-Axion Dark Matter. This paper like many of its parallel papers makes predictions about what can/should be observed in future experiments.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  19. #199
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 29 May 2012

    CATEGORIES: FUN STUFF, PENROSE, EXOPLANETS, COMETS, COMPUTING

    This week in awesome is a study with lots of pictures of waterfowl in large groups.

    Also noteworthy is the foreword to Roger Penrose's "A Computable Universe".

    Yes, that's right. In my mind, Roger Penrose was upstaged by a bunch of waterfowl.

    ---

    FUN STUFF

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5929 - American coot collective on-water dynamics

    American coots are birds. This study involved observing large numbers of these birds swimming around and...I'm sorry. I just can't stop laughing! This paper is ridiculously fun and it's actually really awesome. Unless you seriously have something against waterfowl, take a look at this paper. Now.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5651 - Measuring the Evolution of Contemporary Western Popular Music

    This study analyzes musical patterns and metrics for pop songs and finds that they have been more or less stable for more than fifty years. They suggest that an old tune could sound novel and fashionable by changing the instrumentation and making it louder. If that made you laugh, read the paper!

    ---

    PENROSE

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5823 - Foreword to A Computable Universe - Roger Penrose

    This is the first 22 pages of Roger Penrose's, "A Computable Universe - Understanding Computation & Exploring Nature as Computation." Roger Penrose, of course, needs no introduction. Whether or not you agree with his views on quantum mechanics, you can't ignore him. (Personally, I feel free to ignore every OTHER quantum consciousness proponent.)

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5801 - Cheap Space-Based Microlens Parallaxes for High-Magnification Events

    This paper proposes the use of a small space telescope which could be used to determine the galactic distribution of planets. They propose the use of a particular subset of microlensing events which peak at high magnification as seen from Earth. This method combines ground-based observations with just a single satellite observation. This paper is of interest to anyone who likes to keep on top of methods of exoplanet detection.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.5835 - The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets

    This paper presents results of a radial method exoplanet hunt. It includes a lot of varied graphs and nuts and bolts. It's certainly of interest to those who want to delve a little deeper into the details of using the radial method.

    ---

    COMETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6000 - Location of upper borders of cavities containing dust and gas under pressure in comets

    This short paper estimates a depth of less than 6m between the point Deep Impact's hit Compet 9P/Tempel 1 and the upper border of the largest cavity excavated. Based on this, cavities containing dust and gas under significant pressure only a few meters below the surface of comets may be frequent.

    ---

    COMPUTING

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6022 - Spin-Based Neuron Model with Domain Wall Magnets as Synapse

    This paper has a lot of pictures explaining their concept for neural network computing using nano-magnets, with 95% lower power consumption than CMOS. This is of interest to anyone into radical computing technologies.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6154 - POTENTIALS AND LIMITS OF SUPER-RESOLUTION ALGORITHMS AND SIGNAL RECONSTRUCTION FROM SPARSE DATA

    You know how science fiction and crime dramas throw around "image enhance"? Well, this paper is about how to actually do it! The basic idea is simple to state--take multiple frames of low resolution video and combine them in a way to improve resolution and noise. If you've ever tried doing this with the obvious methods, you know this is easier said than done. The results here are quite impressive. The last third of this paper applies the methods to CT scans, also with impressive results.

  20. #200
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    From 30 May 2102

    There are 47 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements. There were more papers than usual about pulsars today, and a couple of f(T) gravity papers.
    Topics: *Recoiling SMBH?, EUCLID Mission, LSS & GR, GCs in Fornax, Ice Cube, ALP, 10^20 eV, DCBH*

    *Recoiling SMBH?* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6202 CID-42 is a pair of colliding galaxies that *might* have an SMBH moving at abotu 1% of c away from their new core. Exciting topic, great to visualize. This paper dmapens the spirit by showing some observations that make this scenario seem like a less likely option.

    *EUCLID Mission* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6215 In 2019 (if things stick to schedule) th ESA will launch the EUCLID mission intending to measure the large scale distribution of Dark Matter, and find more about the nature of Dark Energy. This paper looks at using the results of this mission as a definitive test of GR vs. MoND.

    *Large Scale Structure & GR* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6304 This single author, not-yet-peer-reviewed paper shows that large scale structure in the early universe seems to better reflect time-varying gravity in the early universe, rather than standard GR and LCDM. I include it because of the author's bold claim that it rules out LCDM and GR with 99% confidence. I thought I'd check to see if I could spot a flaw in his reasoning.

    *GCs in Fornax D Sph* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6327 The Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal galaxy has some globular clusters! This is what caught my eye. The paper is about using the GCs to measure mass distribution inside the Fornax, which is also cool.

    *Ice Cube* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6405 Just briefly, this looks at the 100,000 high energy neutrinos that Ice Cube has detected so far, and discusses what science has been/ will be revealed with this instrument, even though no obvious GRB neutrinos have yet been discovered.

    *ALP* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6428 Axion-Like Particles are a class of candidates for Dark Matter. They have been, until now, very difficult to find a way to measure. This paper proposes a method that can confirm or rule out ALPs as dark matter, having to do with the transparency of the universe for 100 TeV photons.

    *10^20 eV* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6435 10^20 eV cosmic rays come from someplace.... we know because we've observed six of them since Cherenkov arrays started looking. Two of the six came from the same direction (as best as can be measured by looking at air showers), and that direction is a millisecond-xray-pulsar called Aquilla X-1, about 12,000 light years from here. Generally, it seems like such high energy CRs need to be local (galactic) because of the GZK effect.

    *DCBH* http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6464 This paper is about DIrect Collapse Black Holes in the roughly z=16 universe. The idea being that conditions early enough might have supprted the creation of the seeds for our SMBHs by matter pouring in to an early Pop III protostar faster than it could push it away for long enough to form a black hole.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  21. #201
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    First off, I want to give a big thank you to StupendousMan for covering for me the last two weeks. I was unable to do the papers due to circumstances beyond my control and he stepped up and covered for me, so thank you.

    There were 80 papers today and of those there e were 47 new, 8 cross posted, leaving 25 replacements. There were several other papers on exo-planets. Several on different aspects of GRBs. Several on different aspects of dust or accretion disks. And finally, a couple of different papers on solar or solar like stars and their rotation, differential rotation, or several different aspects of their magnetic properties.

    As always, those who want to check out other papers can find them here


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6471 The Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-Type Galaxies From Absorption Line Spectroscopy. I. Data and Empirical Trends

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6473 The Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-Type Galaxies From Absorption Line Spectroscopy. II. Results

    Pieter van Dokkum, Charlie Conroy
    I normally put two or more papers into the lead paragraph. But, I thought these two pretty timely, as the discussion of creation of galaxies has turned to talking about early (~8 < z) galaxies.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6647 The effect of realistic equations of state and general relativity on the "snowplow" model for pulsar glitches

    Stefano Seveso, Pierre M. Pizzochero, Brynmor Haskell
    Pulsars “glitch”, change their rotation rate randomly. Small glitches are considered to be “crust quakes”. This paper looks at large glitches and their causes using the mass of the pulsar, equation of state, and relativistic gravity.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6476 Dipoles in the Sky

    Cameron Gibelyou, Dragan Huterer
    Interesting observation based test on the isotropy of space using various wavelengths based on various catalogs. Basically, there doesn’t seem to be any dipoles. However, they authors propose further tests based on upcoming new observations.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6482 Magnetic Interactions in Coalescing Neutron Star Binaries

    Anthony L. Piro
    Once again, a paper for those who argue that electric or magnetic effects are not taken into account. Here the authors show how magnetic interactions may speed up the inspiral of the neutron star binaries.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6492 16 New Transiting Planet Candidates from Kepler Q1-Q6 Data
    Xu Huang (1), Gáspár Á. Bakos (1,2), Joel D. Hartman
    For those interested in the discovery of exo-planets, this paper discusses 16 new possibilities using the Kepler data.

  22. #202
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    Friday 1 Jun 2012

    I'm a little late today because I had to wait and and get a good read on this paper after some rest:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6800 Limits on dust emission from z~5 LBGs and their local environments
    This is a very good example of astronomy on the fringe: looking as far as we can possibly extend spectral observations and developing new constraint upon the universe at a time frame so far away. I love how many options Davies explores in searching for a model that matches these observatations, and the tantelizing clues about how much more we will learn from the next generation of scopes. As long as we keep cranking up the power, we will keep learning.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1205.6804.pdf EVIDENCE OF FAST MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION IN AN ACCRETING MILLISECOND PULSAR
    Single author, but credible. White dwarf spin-down remains on of the most enigmatic fields of study in our galaxy. This compilation of seven years of data finds an anti correlation between spindown and X-ray flux; which seems intuitively backwards, and likely an important clue.

    Supernova paper of the day:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6973 Photometric observations of the supernova 2009nr
    Another one of those nagging over luminous type Ia that dirty up the standard candle model.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6810 The Submm and mm Excess of the SMC: Magnetic Dipole Emission from Magnetic Nanoparticles? Here is another potential fly-in-the-ointment. IR excesses are hard to account for. extremely tiny magnetic fields should fluctuate due to thermal shock in a vacuum. Is this what we are seeing? A thesis like this is hard to prove or disprove; and if such particle clouds are common (and they could be); this becomes a difficult variable to quantify.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6812 The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: the transition to large-scale cosmic homogeneity
    Even for those of us who eschew dark solutions, finding large scale homogeneity is comforting. Without it, it becomes difficult to apply the Copernicus Principle, without which there is little hope of understanding the past or the future. (The Copernicus Principle is the general assumption that there is nothing unique about our position in the universe.)

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1205.6815.pdfA peculiar galaxy appears at redshift 11: properties of a
    moderate redshift interloper?

    Alas it is not to be - this galaxy has a dropout in the spectra that mimics the results expected at very high redshifts. It resides at a redshift of 'only' ~ 2

    There is a series of three papers on atrometrics that reach a stunning conclusion:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6863
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6864
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6865
    A collision with our galaxy while our sun is still active! Maybe we will bum a ride on a younger star and extend our brief stay in the universe a few eons longer!

    Finally:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.6906 The strongest gravitational lenses: I. The statistical impact of cluster mergers
    One of the what's-up-with-this?s we are facing is that gravitational lensing is much more prevalent than current models predict. These authors look and the influence of mergers and conclude it is to early to conclude there is anything wrong with current theory and the Einstein radius.
    Last edited by Jerry; 2012-Jun-03 at 03:25 AM.

  23. #203
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    Astronomy Papers that Caught My Eye in Todays arXiv

    Today's batch is small with only 37 papers not counting replacements.

    Topics: Pop III star with JWST, Local DM, Galactic Debris, Darko-Lepto-Genesis

    Pop III star with JWST http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0007 The JWST will be able to do some amazing things. One thing it probably won't be able to do is (even with lensing) see individual Population III stars at z between 10 and 30. They won't be launching this thing until 2018 (if all goes well budget-wise), but it is interesting to me to get a sense of how much longer before this anticipated part of astronomy will begin... and it looks like at least another 20 years.

    Local DM http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0015 Remember that paper a few weeks ago saying there was way less dark matter locally than models had predicted? That paper introduced a technique (that it badly applied), that has spawned several other groups to use. Here's another one, and it finds slightly more DM than expected.

    Galactic Debris http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0269 The Palomar Transient Factory stumbled on a bunch of RR Lyrae stars about 86 kiloparsecs from here, and flying away quickly. These are probably two separate debris fields from galaxies previously tidally disrupted by the Milky Way. So, this is two more data points in the history of our galaxy's formation.

    Darko-Lepto-Genesis http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0009 Realistically, it will be many decades before we really know what happened during inflation, and the creation of the matter that is familiar to us. Here is one more interesting model involving a scalar triplet near 10^17 eV (assuming Higgs at 125 GeV). It makes a nice story, and I like getting a sense of the current possibilities, even if there is no way we're close to an answer.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  24. #204
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    There were 67 papers today and of those there were 45 new, 6 cross posted, leaving 16 replacements. Among those papers not singled out were two on microquasars; several on dust (accretion disk, protoplanetary disk, supernova CSM among others; several on star forming galaxies; and a oouple each with a different take on Star forming galaxies contribute to the GeV gamma ray background. As always, those who want to check out other papers can find them here


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0740 Thin disc, Thick Disc and Halo in a Simulated Galaxy
    B. Brook, et al.

    A recent discussion about the cosmological simulations how those simulations incorporate galaxies and their formation. This paper details the simulation of the evolution of a disk galaxy.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0745 The structure and emission model of the relativistic jet in the quasar 3C 279 inferred from radio to high-energy gamma-ray observations in 2008-2010
    M Hayashida et al.

    This paper looks at two possibilities, depending on the distance from the central black hole, for the explanation of the change in optical polarization of the 3C 279 Jet. I have a soft spot for this quasar as the superluminal jet was major news in my first math required college astronomy class.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0941 The Primeval Populations of the Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies
    Thomas M. Brown et al.

    This discusses three ultra-faint dwarf galaxies that are Milky Way Satellites. Interestingly, all three appear to be as old as M-92, about the age of the universe. All three also, again like M-92 to be made up of almost entirely of Hydrogen and Helium, IOW, they have very low metallicity.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0737 Extragalactic Science and Cosmology with the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS)
    Richard Ellis et al.

    The PFS is a massively-multiplexed fiber-fed optical and near-infrared spectrograph and is designed to allow simultaneous low and intermediate-resolution spectroscopy of 2400 astronomical targets over a 1.3 degree hexagonal field. This gives an overview of the expected science.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0759 Near-IR Variability in Young Stars in Cygnus OB7
    Thomas S. Rice (1), Scott J. Wolk (1), Colin Aspin

    I found this one rather astonishing as they followed a dark cloud star forming region over a 1.5 year 124 night observing period. They tracked 9200(!) stars for variability. The observations are presented here.

  25. #205
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 5 June 2012

    CATEGORIES: EXOPLANETS, TELESCOPES, MISC

    This week had interesting exoplanet papers; I even skipped a couple. It also had a paper on a gravity telescope, which to me is almost as weird an idea as Professor Farnsworth's Smell-O-Scope.

    ---

    EXOPLANETS


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0334 - Outcomes and Duration of Tidal Evolution in a Star-Planet-Moon System

    This paper shows where moons could survive, and for how long, including a lot of graphs for the four basic solution types (tide locked with moon, tide locked with star and then moon, not tide locked, and moon lost). There's one particularly interesting graph about Earth mass planets and moons. Interestingly, this graph includes possibilities with low mass ratios--such as a Venus sized moon or a Neptune sized planet.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0558 - CAN GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES DETECT THE OXYGEN 1.27 MICRON ABSORPTION FEATURE AS A BIOMARKER IN EXOPLANETS ?

    This paper analyzes the possibilities and challenges of trying to detect oxygen in exoplanet atmospheres. Obviously this paper is of interest for anyone interested in the search for alien life.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0601 - SOPHIE velocimetry of Kepler transit candidates VI. A false positive rate of 35% for Kepler close-in giant candidates

    This paper is a detailed example of using the radial method to confirm or deny transit method exoplanet candidates. It's particularly interesting for those of us following Kepler results.

    ---

    TELESCOPES

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0331 - Scientific Objectives of Einstein Telescope

    This paper describes the Einstein Gravitational-Wave Telescope, and the sort of science it could conduct. I personally don't understand how these things work or how they're used to study various problems, but I include it here for those who do (or would like to).

    ---

    MISC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0712 - SOLAR DIAMETER WITH 2012 VENUS TRANSIT: HISTORY AND OPPORTUNITIES

    This sweet little paper is about the Venus transit that you already know about. If you're into that sort of thing.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0461 - Geometric Mechanics of Curved Crease Origami

    I fold origami, although I generally stick with classic straight edged folds. This paper studies a specific case of a circular curved fold on an annular paper strip. I think this paper could be an interesting starting point to more complex folds, which could lead to interesting 3d modeling for CGI animation, architecture, and maybe some sort of paper/cardboard product design.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0604 - Modern consumerism and the waste problem

    This paper is about how stupid things like proprietary connection ports and planned obsolescence result in excess waste in consumer electronics, and what to do about it. Please read this paper if you don't think this is a problem.

  26. #206
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    a new gravitational wave detector

    Noise in the lasers in LIGOs limit their sensitivity. a new method using atomic clocks is schemed out with a simpler design (one dimensional) SEE:http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0818 pete

  27. #207
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    Saw this one today and although it's 70 pages, struck me as a nice overview of recent research and outstanding problems, and might even serve as a reference for civilians such as myself before bothering you folks with stupid questions/"observations":

    From Disks to Planets
    Andrew N. Youdin and Scott J. Kenyon
    Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
    This pedagogical chapter covers the theory of planet formation, with an emphasis on the physical processes relevant to current research. After summarizing empirical constraints from astronomical and geophysical data, we describe the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks.
    Post Edit by admin: The link to this paper is: http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0738
    Last edited by antoniseb; 2012-Jun-06 at 01:45 PM. Reason: added link

  28. #208
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    Nov 2002
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    6,238
    There were 78 papers today and of those there were 41 new, 9 cross posted, leaving 28 replacements. There were a couple of papers on solar magnetism, a couple on gravitational lensing, a couple on using proper motions to identify star families, outgassing of comet 103P/Hartley 2, and, as seemingly always, a few on dust, in its various forms. As always, those who want to check out other papers can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.1086 Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations
    Eric J. Lentz, Anthony Mezzacappa, O.E. Bronson Messer, W. Raphael Hix, Stephen W. Bruenn

    I found this rather interesting, as most of us normally think of neutrinos as particles that pass through almost everything, without interacting. These numerical simulations point out that during core-collapse supernovae, neutrinos become “trapped”. Emitted
    neutrinos are reabsorbed, depending on the opacity of the neutrinos in the core.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.1139 The variation of fundamental constants and the role of A=5 and A=8 nuclei on primordial nucleosynthesis
    Alain Coc, Pierre Descouvemont, Keith Olive, Jean-Philippe Uzan, Elisabeth Vangioni

    This group did some calculation to see if changing some of the fundamental constants would have any effect on the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. For the isotopes investigated here, there doesn’t seem to be any change during BBN.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.1177 WASP-78b and WASP-79b: Two highly-bloated hot Jupiter-mass exoplanets orbiting F-type stars in Eridanus
    Smalley et al.

    It's always fun when you find the largest, most massive or hottest whatever. Two recently discovered plants circling stars in Eridanus. One, WASP-78b is one of the hottest (2350-2380 ± ~60 K) and WASP-79b may be the largest (by radius) with a radius of 1.7-2.1 RJup with a mass of ~.9 MJup.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.1298 Pre-MS depletion, accretion and primordial 7Li
    Molaro, A. Bressan, M. Barbieri, P. Marigo, S. Zaggia

    A new hypothesis explains that while the pre Main-sequence 7Li abundance may burn completely in a .85 Sun mass star, the accretion prior to lighting off, would still leave the star with a abundance of 7Li. This would also help explain several other low 7Li puzzles.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.1266 Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers
    Stacy H. Teng et al.

    Observations trying to find mergers that produce binary AGNs. While optically active with a binary x-ray component are fairly common, the true x-ray binary has not been found. The one possible candidate cannot rule out star formation as one of the x-ray sources. None of these were any of my contributions to the Galaxy Zoo. But, since I did contribute, I always find stuff on the Galaxy Zoo worth looking at.

  29. #209
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    Fun Papers: Friday, June 9 2012

    Fifty papers tonight, eleven of them cross listings.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1112.6364 Hints of Standard Model Higgs Boson at the LHC and Light Dark Matter Searches
    I get to argue with the title, because the net result-to-date of the Large Hadron Collider has been to rule out most of the parameter space for the Higgs Boson. This paper explores what is left. The term DARKON is new to me; but if it takes one more parameter to keep everyone happy, so be it...especially if the paper contains testable predictions, and there are.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.1540 Deep near-infrared spectroscopy of passively evolving galaxies at z>1.4
    Subaru/MOIRCS keeps demonstrating the more we know, the less we understand. One line in the abstract glares out at me: "All galaxies fall in four distinct redshift spikes at z=1.43, 1.53, 1.67 and 1.82, with this latter one including 7 galaxies." Do periodic spikes in galactic distributions at specific redshifts really make sense? Not to Copernicans. Periodic effects seemed to be occuring in quasars at lower redshifts , but upon closer examination, the distributions generally appear to be selection effects.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1206.1485.pdf STEREO observations of long period variables This is a fun fall-out of sterio vision: Periodic effects are easy to seperate from warbles due to seeing. The results are...confusing.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1206.1434.pdf The large area KX quasar catalogue: I. Analysis of the photometric redshift selection and the complete quasar catalogue It is interesting that this paper deals with the redshift-dependent selection effects I mentioned above. Nice paper.

  30. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by quotation View Post
    Saw this one today and although it's 70 pages, struck me as a nice overview of recent research and outstanding problems, and might even serve as a reference for civilians such as myself before bothering you folks with stupid questions/"observations":

    From Disks to Planets
    Andrew N. Youdin and Scott J. Kenyon
    Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory


    Post Edit by admin: The link to this paper is: http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0738
    This is especially interesting and helpful. I owe you a small ice cream cone. My compliments to y'all and your abstract abstractions.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

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