Page 6 of 28 FirstFirst ... 4567816 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 180 of 812

Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #151
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,185
    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 3 Apr 2012

    Categories: APRIL 1, EXOPLANETS, FTL, CHAOS, ASSORTED

    This week included some April Fool's papers. There were also quite a few papers about exoplanets, which I generally find interesting. We have a couple FTL papers, a couple chaos papers, and a few assorted papers that didn't fit into any pattern.

    ---

    APRIL 1


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0492 - Non-detection of the Tooth Fairy at Optical Wavelengths

    This paper details a failed attempt to telescopically detect the Tooth Fairy, with speculation that higher time resolution may be necessary in case of an FTL Tooth Fairy.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0298 - On the Ratio of Circumference to Diameter for the Largest Observable Circles: An Empirical Approach

    This paper uses cosmology theory on the largest observable circles (horizon of the visible universe) and finds that 3.2 and 22/7 are viable values for pi. However, 3 is ruled out.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0162 - The Proof of Innocence

    This paper claims to be proof of innocence on a traffic ticket. Fooled you! It's actually only a proof of reasonable doubt! Bet you didn't see that one coming.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0190 - Clarification as to why alcoholic beverages have the ability to induce superconductivity in Fe1+dTe1-xSx

    Haha! Meta-April Fools! Despite being submitted on April 1, this is a real paper with real research on a true, if amusing, effect. Yes, booze does indeed have the ability to induce superconductivity. This paper reports on their research into figuring out why. No, really!

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0275 - Evolution of magnetic protection in potentially habitable terrestrial planets

    An impressive work modeling the atmosphere and water loss of exoplanets in liquid water habitable zones--with particular attention to tide locked ones. They find that tide locked Earth mass planets likely have lost their atmospheres while super-Earths have better chances of preserving their atmospheres.

    Obviously, this is of interest to anyone who, like myself, is interested in possible life on exoplanets. Of course, I'm personally optimistic that neither atmospheres nor surface liquid water are required for life, but even so this is interesting in terms of relatively "earth-like" life.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0025 - The Exozodiacal Dust Problem for Direct Observations of ExoEarths

    This paper examines how exozodiacal dust will adversely affects attempts to directly observe Earth-like exoplanets in habitable zones. It explains two basic problems--the bright noise from the dust compared to Earth-sized exoplanets, and the confusion of dust clumps. It then goes on to describe some possible ideas for dealing with these problems. Like the above paper, this is interesting for the search for life bearing exoplanets.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0007 - Constraining the Planetary System of Fomalhaut Using High-Resolution ALMA Observations

    If you're an exoplanet fan, Fomalhaut needs no introduction. This paper considers several possible origins for Fomalhaut's ring, and concludes that it likely has shepherd planets.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0030 - A Search for Hierarchical Triples using Kepler Eclipse Timing

    Okay, technically this paper is about stars rather than exoplanets, but the data is from Kepler. It's something of an example of the artificiality of the separation between the study of "stars" and "planets".

    ---

    FTL

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0351 - Artificial Wormhole - A. A. Kirillov, E. P. Savelova

    This paper claims that the FTL OPERA neutrinos are the result of artificial wormholes. I don't understand the math, so while I'm skeptical I won't comment on the merits. This isn't an April Fools paper--a quick google search reveals that E.P. Savelova has other papers with Kirillov's name attached, about the same general topics.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0484 - The superluminal neutrino hypothesis - Robert Ehrlich

    Another FTL neutrino paper, taking into consideration OPERA, SN 1987A, cosmic rays, and other things. His idea is that one of the neutrinos is a tachyon.

    Well, I guess it's still too soon for FTL neutrino ideas to be fully deflated yet.

    ---

    CHAOS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0324 - Chaotic orbits in a 3D galactic dynamical model with a double nucleus

    A fun paper with pictures of chaotic galactic orbits, in a galaxy with a double nucleus. I'm a sucker for the pretty pictures.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0045 - A Novel Strange Attractor with a Stretched Loop

    Another fun paper with pictures of chaos. In this case, it's a new pure mathematical strange attractor, rather than some particular physics model.

    ---

    ASSORTED

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0371 - The shape of a ponytail and the statistical physics of hair fiber bundles

    This paper investigates a surprisingly understudied question: "What is the shape of a ponytail?" It examines the shape of a ponytail and its physical causes. It also examines current model problems. This is a topic which I find more interesting after having seen Tangled, which was just a mind-blowingly incredible effort in hair modelling.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0070 - Analytical Modelling of a Plucked Piezoelectric Bimorph for Energy Harvesting

    This paper examines the potential to use "plucked" piezoelectrics for energy harvesting, as opposed to lower frequency piezoelectrics with end weights or coil based electromagnetics. It's an interesting idea, intuitively, but of course the challenge is in taking that intuition and quantifying it.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0057 - Dual-camera system for high-speed imaging in particle image velocimetry

    This idea is simple enough. Use two still cameras to take two closely timed pictures of a bunch of moving particles. Use the two pictures to determine the velocities of the particles, thus calculating a velocity vector field. Of course, just because an idea is simple doesn't mean that it's a good, workable, idea. As is so often the case, the best way to figure out if it's a good idea is to just go ahead and do it.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0330 - Optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas

    This paper with lots of cool pictures studies miniature versions of Yagi-Uda antennas, downsized from the traditional radio wavelengths to optical wavelengths!

  2. #152
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 4 April 2012

    There are 40 papers today, not counting replacements, and few of them really excited me (which I should probably blame on me). The distribution of topics seems typical.

    Topics- LOCAL: Chaos in Ellipticals, Forming Planets, Gammas from DM, OWL-T

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0709 This paper looks at the orbits of stars in elliptical galaxies, and determines that in spite of what you might have read, it IS possible for chaos to be maintained over the life of the universe so far.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0739 This paper uses evidence from meteorites from Mars to hypothesize that Chondrules formed in the bow-shock of embryonic planets in the early solar system.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0655 There was an article floating around yesterday about the non-detection of DM annihilation from ten dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way. This paper claims detection of DM annihilation gammas from the center of our galaxy (which should be a much stronger source if (in fact) DM is self-annihilating WIMPs. This detection was done with HESS, not FERMI. Looking at the graphs, I'd say there's still some confirming to do... but this is a cool result.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.0526 Do you remember the OWL Telescope? This was a proposed 100 meter optical telescope. This is a somewhat humorous request to restore funding to the project as though written by the VLT. Should bring a smile or two.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  3. #153
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,238
    There were 74 papers today and of those there e were 47 new and just 5 cross posted, leaving 22 replacements. There were a couple of papers on underwater neutrino telescopes, and several on different types of masers observations. As always, those who want to check out these other papers can find them here

    arXiv:1204.0800 Comparing Poynting flux dominated magnetic towers with kinetic-energy dominated jets
    Martín Huarte-Espinosa , Adam Frank , Eric G. Blackman , Andrea Ciardi , Patrick M. Hartigan , Sergey Lebedev, Jeremy P. Chittenden

    Yeah, I know, more railing against EU/PU proponents. Since there have been some claims, over the last few days in Q & A, abut how Electric/Plasma universe proponents make their ideas sound so good. I thought I’d show those who follow those proponents how they somehow don’t get around to doing these kind of detailed modeling.

    arXiv:1204.0910 Phase Transition and Anisotropic Deformations of Neutron Star Matter
    G. Nelmes, B. M. A. G. Piette

    I found this one interesting as I included a paper last week on quark stars. This one includes different models, different assumptions, and comes to different conclusions. Some of the masses in lasts weeks papers, which would produce quark stars, in this paper, produce neutron stars. The comparisons are interesting.

    arXiv:1204.0941 The origin of the late rebrightening in GRB 080503
    R Hascoët, F. Daigne, R. Mochkovitch

    This GRB was one of a special class where instead of a declining afterglow, there is a sharp re-brightening, then followed by the declining afterglow. This paper looks at some models that could explain the re-brightening and puts some constraints on the beaming angles.

    arXiv:1204.0899 "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region -- VII. Size and surface characteristics of (90377) Sedna and 2010 EK139
    András Pál et al.

    A short (four pages) read that goes over the optical and thermal properties of the surface of two Trans-Neptunian objects. They were able to get the size with about 97% confidence.

    arXiv:1204.0909 Ricci focusing, shearing, and the expansion rate in an almost homogeneous Universe
    Krzysztof Bolejko, Pedro G. Ferreira

    I found this interesting as we know that there are inhomogeneities in the universe, but on large scales the universe is homogeneous. This paper looks at how those inhomogeneities can affect what we actually see and how that affects the match between theory and observation.

  4. #154
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ocean Shores, Wa
    Posts
    5,224

    Papers for Friday, April 6

    Only forty papers today, and some fun highlights:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1267TeV Gamma-ray Astronomy: A Summary
    Very good gamma ray review, with excellent charts and mapping.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1318 Planck Intermediate Results II: Comparison of Sunyaev-Zeldovich measurements from Planck and from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager for 11 galaxy clustersThis paper focuses the curious discrepancies between Planck results and ground based observations. Planck and AMI (large array) do not agree on the boundries of SZ signals, and this puts limits on how accurately the CMB can be compensated in these regions. I would like to see a similar comparison between Planck and WMAP SZ maps.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1155 Progenitors of type Ia supernovae Up-to-date review by Wang, one of the SNIa principles.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1083 Cosmological Tests Plagued by Small-Scale Inhomogeneities Lima and Busti argue that recent papers questioning the ACDM model are handicapped by the possibility we - our galaxy - may be in a locally low density or high density region; and as such, our prospective up to 100Mps out. Interesting thesis, because a local variance in density also limits the accuracy of any Cosmic solution.
    Last edited by Jerry; 2012-Apr-07 at 04:48 AM.

  5. #155
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 09 April 2012

    There are 40 papers today, not counting replacements, but this batch had a large fraction that I found interesting for some reason or another. Of the ones I didn't select, I didn't notice any particular concentration in one sub field or another, but there was less solar physics than usual.

    LOCAL: Jovian Trojan, Tidal Planet Heating, Low Mass WD, Sgr A-star, SN Progenitor, Microwave Camera, COSMOLOGICAL: Structure at Z~20, New Physics at 100TeV

    *LOCAL: Jovian Trojan*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1388 There are lots of Trojans, and this one (1173-Anchises) has been known for a long time, but the paper is a closer look at this oblong dark body (reflects about 2% of the light that hits it). The paper looks at this and similar Trojans and the stability of their orbits, and suggests them as a major source of short period comets.

    *LOCAL: Tidal Planet Heating*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1468 Different planets have different layer-systems with different plasticity (viscoelasticity). These authors did simulations to study the heating, and other effects in anelastic systems to better understand the planets and moons in our solar system and in exoplanet systems. People ask for numbers and settling times, and I can only wave my hands and point to our one well studied example (the Earth-Moon system). Now I can saw more.

    *LOCAL: Low Mass WD*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1338 Just briefly, this paper is details of what we know about a 170 Jupiter-Mass cold white dwarf that was recently studied. As it happens this star is orbiting another degenerate star, and is pulsating, so we have mass information and astroseismological information, and between them we know lots about this object which is outside the bounds (less massive) of previously known objects in its class.

    *LOCAL: Sgr A-Star*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1371 The Title is "The Galactic Center Weather Forecast". That caught my eye right away. This is predictions for what instruments will be available, and what they should be able to observe in mid-2013 when the cloud mentioned a few months ago gets to its closest approach to Sgr A*

    *LOCAL: SN Progenitor*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1523 2012aw is a nearby Type II supernovae, AND we have images of the galaxy from before it brightened, and the progenitor was a Red Giant. Brightness indicates it had a mass between 14 and 26 solar masses, making it perhaps the most massive progenitors yet identified (not a large pool to choose from).

    *LOCAL: Microwave Camera*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1415 Sometimes the new gadgets catch my interest. In this case, the paper is discussing NIKEL which is a prototype for microwave imaging. It is a camera using kinetic inductance to enable having (400 in the prototype) thousands of pixels in the microwave focal plane, and needing only a small number of coax cables (two). One more step toward easier astronomy!

    *COSMOLOGICAL: Structure at Z~20*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1344 and http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1345 are a couple papers by the same authors on related topics, namely simulations on the formation of (LCDM) cosmic structures from 15<z<200. The first paper seems more focused on the first stars, and how the material that formed them came together, while the second paper is more about the 21cm radiation emitted during those epochs and what it should look like to the SKA and other instruments capable of seeing it.

    *COSMOLOGICAL: New Physics at 100TeV*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1488 I'm not taking this very seriously (yet), but the authors are looking at the penetration depth of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and are seeing *something* odd. I'm a little slower than they are to jump from "something odd" to "needs new physics". However their analysis points out that something seems to happen to protons at or above 100 TeV that deserves our attention.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  6. #156
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    8,198
    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    From 09 April 2012

    *LOCAL: Sgr A-Star*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1371 The Title is "The Galactic Center Weather Forecast". That caught my eye right away. This is predictions for what instruments will be available, and what they should be able to observe in mid-2013 when the cloud mentioned a few months ago gets to its closest approach to Sgr A*.
    No weather channel meteorologist in the field to get in the way? Crud...

  7. #157
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    No weather channel meteorologist in the field to get in the way? Crud...
    This event occurred 25,000 years before the creation of the weather channel, so its not a question of foresight or budget.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  8. #158
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,185
    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 10 Apr 2012

    Categories: ODD STUFF, EXOPLANETS, SCIENCE HISTORY, FRINGE SCIENCE,

    This week in awesome is a paper which implements a binary logic gates using swarms of soldier crabs. That's right. Soldier crabs.

    I generally noticed a lot of odd as well as a lot of questionable papers this week. Only one non-fringe astronomy paper really caught my eye, though.

    ---

    ODD STUFF

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1749 - Robust Soldier Crab Ball Gate

    This study first develops a simplistic cellular simulation of soldier crab swarm motion, and uses it to develop a theoretical implementation of and AND gate. (They also simulate an OR gate, but this is really simple--just a "Y" intersection with the two inputs branching from the output.) Then comes the fun part! Implementing a physical model using actual soldier crabs! The paper explains lots of fun little details of the implementation, such as the "intimidation plates" which form shadows that scare the crabs to move away from the input ends and the use of cork floor material to form a comfortable walking surface.

    How totally and wonderfully useless!


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1560 - About the Mechanism of Geyser Eruption

    Honestly I don't even know what to make of this paper, on a scientific level. The mathematical theory is minimal and data seems practically non-existent. But a couple pictures near the end caught my eye--pictures of a "device" for demonstration of the proposed geyser eruption mechanism. The author made a crude device using a bottled water bottle and a piece of water tubing. In his kitchen, apparently, based on the photos. Also included is an inadequate description of how this demonstrator is supposed to demonstrate this theory.

    Oh, what the heck. Maybe this paper doesn't even deserve to be called a scientific paper, or maybe so. But I can't help but find that "device" amusing.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1773 - Existence of Faster Than Light Signals Implies Hypercomputation Already in Special Relativity

    This paper shows how hypercomputation is possible in special relativity if and only if there's a way to send FTL signals. Not exactly earth-shattering stuff, but interesting for relativity fans.

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1705 - Tidal evolution of exo-planetary systems: WASP-50, GJ 1214 and CoRoT-7

    This paper simulates out tidal evolution of several exoplanets. While these specific planets may not be candidates for alien life, I am generally fascinated by the possibility that maybe some Europa style exoplanets or exomoons bear biospheres powered by hydrothermal vents and cold seeps rather than solar energy. Tidal forces could provide long term stable energy input.

    ---

    SCIENCE HISTORY

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1833 - Einstein Chases a Light Beam by Galina Weinstein

    This isn't a paper but rather a draft of the first ~50 pages of a book Galina Weinstein intends to write about Einstein about his scientific thinking between 1902 and 1905--a period which is usually skipped due to lack of information. Obviously, this draft will be of interest to science history buffs.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1625 - The Universe, the Cold War, and Dialectical Materialism

    This history paper mainly discusses the politicization of cosmology in the Soviet Union during the early Cold War period. Again, this will be of interest to science history buffs.

    ---

    FRINGE SCIENCE

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1885 - Is the aether entrained by the motion of celestial bodies? What do the experiments tell us? by Joseph Levy

    This guy states that "aether is improperly regarded as outdated". This will either cause you to instantly dismiss this paper or instantly curious about what in the world this guy has to say.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1719 - Transfer of Life-Bearing Meteorites from Earth to Other Planets by Tetsuya Hara, Kazuma Takagi, Daigo Kajiura

    This paper, typical of the dubious "Journal of Cosmology" web site, purports to calculate probabilities of interstellar panspermia. This paper is sloppy and dubious all around, from the naive ignorance of orbital and interstellar motion to the tail-wags-dog approach to figuring out the appropriate size of debris to get the desired non-negligible probabilities to the "what the heck" speculation to how such small pieces of debris are supposed to bear life over millions of years.

    This is the third week in a row where I've included "Journal of Cosmology" web site garbage, and maybe it will be the last. From now on, I'll only include it if there's something truly outstanding in some way.

  9. #159
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 11 Apr 2012

    There are 41 papers today, not counting replacements, including a few about Gravitational Waves, a few about strong lensing providing insteresting constraints, and the usual mix of astronomy topics.

    Topics: *LOCAL: UV from exo-Planets, GRAVITY, A growing SMBH, COSMOLOGICAL: GRBs constraints on PHBs*

    *LOCAL: UV from exo-Planets*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1976 There's a nearby M4 star with planets, and it often has flares detected in the UV. This paper took time resolved UV spectra using Hubble and Swift to see if they could detect flourescence in the atmospheres of the planets. Spoiler alert: they couldn't say for sure, but hopefully future tools will have what is needed.

    *LOCAL: GRAVITY*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2103 GRAVITY is a soon-to-be-used part of the VLTI that will permit very fine identification of the position of sources. The people on this paper are looking at what could be detected by studying the placement of the various stars known to be orbiting Sgr A*. Particularly, they want to study how the high gravity in that locale (including potentially effects from the spin of the black hole) affects the path of the light we see from these stars (altered by tens of microarcseconds).

    *LOCAL: A growing SMBH*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.1970 There is a dwarf starburst galaxy about 30 million light years from here called Heinze 2-10. It is gas rich and forming stars (kind of like the LMC only more intensely). Unlike the LMC, this one has a SMBH (with a mass of about one million Suns - a quarter the mass of the one in the Milky Way), and it is growing. This paper includes some great images, and a lot of discussion about what we've learned and can learn from this object.

    *COSMOLOGICAL: GRBs constraints on PHBs*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2056 One non-WIMP model for dark matter is that it is made of something we refer to as Primordial Black Holes. These would be black holes far to small to be the result of dead-star-collapse, but might have been created during the end of inflation somehow. Different techniques have been used to try and spot them. Because of microlensing surveys like OGLE we know that above 10^26 grams, PBHs are either don't exist, or are less than 1% of the dark matter, but below that mass we're looking for other ways to detect them (such as Sunquakes). This study is about using a special lensing effect in gamma rays from GRBs to look for evidence... and this also shows PBHs between 5x10^17 and 10^20 grams either don't exist or are less than a 1% contributer to dark matter. This still leaves a lot of mass ranges in doubt, but it is interesting to see how issue is progressing.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  10. #160
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,238
    Papers for April 12, 2012.

    There were 64 papers today and of those there e were 31 new and just 6 cross posted, leaving 27 replacements. Thre didn’t seem to be any multiples this week. As always, those who want to check out other papers can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2507 Support for the thermal origin of the Pioneer anomaly
    Slava G. Turyshev, Viktor T. Toth, Gary Kinsella, Siu-Chun Lee, Shing M. Lok, Jordan Ellis

    You may notice I have enlarged the title of this one. This is the big one this week. Last year, Turyshev put out a paper claiming that the Pioneer anomaly was due to a thermal origin. He(and his team) had a quick explanation and some quick calculations. He promised a more extensive look in the near future. Here it is, and a lot of work went into this (going back and getting the actual design documents, using those documents to create a model, solving that model numerically, then comparing the results of that model with the navigation and doppler data). All this ends up with the result that if the thermal force is added, no anomalous acceleration remains. So, based on this, no new physics.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2305 A highly magnified candidate for a young galaxy seen when the Universe was 500 Myrs old
    Wei Zheng, et al.

    A good survey of a galaxy found at ~z 9.6. It is magnified more than 15 times normal and is one of the first objects at z > 9 that will be available for spectroscopic studies by the Webb Space Telescope.

    arXiv:1204.2308 Near-infrared observations of type Ia supernovae: The best known standard candle for cosmology
    L. Barone-Nugent, et al.

    About a year ago, there was a discussion about how well SN1a were really suited to being a standard candle. I mentioned a paper that brought up the point that SN1a, in IR, appeared to be very precise standard candles, but needed more investigation. This paper provides that investigation, and it appears that, yes, they are quite accurate in the near IR bands. Much less scatter in peak magnitude.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2327 Constraints on jet formation mechanisms with the most energetic giant outbursts in MS 0735+7421
    Shuang-Liang Li, Xinwu Cao

    My weekly example of mainstream science using magnetohydrodynamics. And, although this does include a nice example of the Blandford-Znajek process, it shows that the Blandford-Znajek process is not enough to produce the X-ray cavities.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2499 Ultra-high energy cosmic ray correlations with Active Galactic Nuclei in the world dataset
    I. Rubtsov, I. I. Tkachev, A. D. Dolgov

    I didn’t think much of this at first. A quick paper,(3 pages) they note that a correlation between Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) and the direction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) had been found by various cosmic ray collaborations. The authors find that if the various different experimental energy levels are calibrated, the correlations drop from 9 of 13 or 28 of 84 to a expected random 3 of 21. A cautionary tale of making sure your statistics are correlated.

  11. #161
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ocean Shores, Wa
    Posts
    5,224

    Fun Papers: Friday, April 13

    Fifty new papers - a dozen or so fun papers:



    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2778 Chameleon effect and the Pioneer Anomaly A bit moot, since thermal acceleration MAY be the Pioneer driver. However, there is no valid calibration of the directional thermal components; so it is still ok to speculate as to the 'real' cause. John Anderson has not stopped looking yet.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2635 The chemical composition of nearby young associations: s-process element abundances in AB Doradus, Carina-Near, and Ursa Major The S-process gives us some pretty tight predictions about elemental rations. Exceptions raise eyebrows. Barium abundance is one of those eyebrow-raising things: There is too much of it. It would be cool if someone could figure out why.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2546 The dark matter crisis: falsification of the current standard model of cosmology
    It is pretty hard to falsify a theory by assigning attributes to something that has no detectable attributes - other than observations that are not consistent with expectations; in this case, dark matter.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2646 New Limits on Interactions between Weakly Interacting Massive Particles and Nucleons Obtained with CsI(Tl) Crystal Detectors Ho hum, another day, another Dark Matter candidate is scrubbed from the list. At least we are trying.

  12. #162
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 16 April 2012

    There are 46 papers today, not counting replacements, including a heavy concentration on AGNs and SMBHs. I didn't pick any of those.

    Topics: No 21 cm at z=3, Dust Lanes, Neutron Star EoS, MOG

    *No 21 cm at z=3*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2881 Quasars are probably SMBHs that are actively growing. Whatever they are, they give off huge amounts of ionizing UV light. This paper looks at how active galaxies near z=3 have completely turned off star formation within 10,000 light years of the SMBH by ionizing everything that might have been cool enough to condense into a star.

    *Dust Lanes*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2940 Spiral galaxies have dust lanes. We see them locally. How did they form? How long ago? It's funny I never thought to ask... but this paper looks at more distant edge-on spirals (as seen by COSMOS) to get a sense of the evolution of this feature. Spoiler alert: they haven't changed much in the last 7 billion years.

    *Neutron Star EoS*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3030 Some neutron stars orbit other things, and so we are able to make accurate determinations of their mass. Most of them have masses near 1.4 times the mass of the Sun. One of them has a mass of almost twice the mass of the Sun. This is definitely an outlier, but it exists, and that tells us something about the Equation of State of the object, which has implications for our understanding of exotic particles such as Hyperons, and Strange, or Charm matter (it rules out a lot of otherwise cool ideas)... This paper suggests that we could keep all those cool ideas if we are willing to allow the Gravitational constant to change in strong fields (like in the center of a neutron star. Personally, I think this is not a high-value path to follow... but it is an idea I want to understand, because I know it will come up in conversation.

    *MOG*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2985 Some people really don't like the idea of Dark Matter. They dislike it so much that they are willing to look at alternate models of Gravity to try and explain the phenomena that leads us to Dark Matter. The Bullet Cluster and other other colliding clusters really left such groups scratching their heads for a while. Here is a paper about one of these efforts alled MOG, or more specifically Saclar-Tensor-Vector Gravity, in which the Gravitational constant is higher than we measure, but there is a simultaneous repulsive force that has a more limited range giving us the net results we observe locally. Again, I don't think this is a very profitable path, but I want to understand what they're saying.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  13. #163
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,185
    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 17 Apr 2012

    Categories: FUN STUFF, EXOPLANETS, SCIENCE HISTORY, CROWDSOURCING

    This week in "fun" is a theory that Roman dodecahedra were used to play a bowling game. This one's actually from yesterday, but it grabbed me anyway.

    This week there were a lot of computer science papers about crowdsourcing, but the only one which really caught my attention didn't even have the word "crowdsourcing" in the title.

    ---

    FUN STUFF

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3037 - Dodecahedral bowling

    A short sweet paper describing and giving a little support to a theory that Roman Dodecahedra were used to play a bowling game like bocce. Apparently, non-spherical balls have been used to play these games, to make the balls less likely to roll away and get lost. If you don't know what Roman Dodecahedra are for, join the club! No one knows. This theory sounds as good to me as any.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3395 - The Role of Projectile Configuration and Viscosity on the Launch Dynamics of Supersonic Projectiles

    Simulations of 20mm shells leaving gun barrels! Unfortunately, the simulated bullets are a cylinder and a cylinder with conical tip, rather than a curved bullet shape, but hey--you've got to sphere some cows, right?


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3112 - Tricky Arithmetic

    Another short paper, simply describing some simple Martin Gardner style trick math questions and how they can, surprisingly, trip up some bright students and motivate them to think more carefully. For anyone who knows the name "Martin Gardner", these trick questions truly are surprisingly simple so you might think no one would be fooled by them. That's what made it fun for me--just the surprise that such cliche trick questions could trip up smart students.

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3539 - Mantle Dynamics in Super-Earths: Post-Perovskite Rheology and Self-Regulation of Viscosity

    Okay, I don't grok this paper. But it's about the mantle and geology of super-Earth exoplanets. Since various geological effects ranging from plate tectonics to volcanic activity are theorized to affect exoplanet habitability and/or evolution of life, this is of interest to the search for alien life.

    ---

    SCIENCE HISTORY

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3386 - Genesis of general relativity - Discovery of general relativity by Galina Weinstein

    More Einstein history from Galina Weinstein. As with last week, this would be of interest to Einstein history buffs.

    ---

    CROWDSOURCING

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3328 - Ubiquitous Indoor Localization and Worldwide Automatic Construction of Floor Plans

    This paper details concepts for creating a world-wide database of indoor maps using cell phones and various sensors to figure out location. This is, to me, an interesting problem since GPS alone simply won't work. In this study, they use everything from the accelerometers and magnometers to WiFi and GSM signal strength. In particular, the accelerometers are used to estimate distance via counting steps while walking. This is an awesome effort in fusing together all sorts of really sloppy inaccurate data into something more accurate than the sum of its parts.

  14. #164
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 18 April 2012

    There are 60 papers today, not counting replacements, a big drop from the 89 yesterday. Today's batch included quite a few about magnetism, and quite a few about early galaxies. Aside from that, pretty much the usual concentration of astronomy topics.

    Topics: Optical Interferometry, Iron Quasars, Reionization, 1.5 TeV Neutralinos

    *OPTICAL INTERFEROMETRY*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3624 I like new ideas about instruments. This paper looks at using the same cheap telescopes used for Cherenkov Telescope Arrays for large scale optical interferometry. The results could be sub-milliarcsec imaging of close binaries.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3721 Also on the Optical interferometry topic, this paper is about more traditional large telescopes beign connected by optical interferometry... in this case potentially finding planets.

    *IRON QUASARS*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3629 Some quasars have strong Iron and Aluminum lines in their spectra... This paper observes time variation in these lines for the first time. Over an eight year period the Iron concentration in the accretion disks have dropped, and we finally can start modeling mechanisms for this phenomenon.

    *REIONIZATION*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3641 Reionization is something that we know happened at some point. This paper is about a look at very bright galaxies at abotu z=8, which appear to be among the first galaxies to clear the clouds of neutral Hydrogen that made the universe opaque to the wavelengths we usually observe in. Details from this study could potentially help us tune the known parameters of the universe.

    *1.5 TeV Neutralinos*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2856 OK, so the Higgs is about 125 GeV. What does this mean about the Neutralino (still leading candidate to be the Dark Matter WIMP). This paper shows that it is likely that the mass for this particle is 1.5 TeV. Is this something that the LHC will be able to detect once it gets to 14 TeV? Not clear.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  15. #165
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Metrowest, Boston
    Posts
    4,215
    Quote Originally Posted by Tensor View Post
    Papers for April 12, 2012.

    There were 64 papers today and of those there e were 31 new and just 6 cross posted, leaving 27 replacements. Thre didn’t seem to be any multiples this week. As always, those who want to check out other papers can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2507 Support for the thermal origin of the Pioneer anomaly
    Slava G. Turyshev, Viktor T. Toth, Gary Kinsella, Siu-Chun Lee, Shing M. Lok, Jordan Ellis

    You may notice I have enlarged the title of this one. This is the big one this week. Last year, Turyshev put out a paper claiming that the Pioneer anomaly was due to a thermal origin. He(and his team) had a quick explanation and some quick calculations. He promised a more extensive look in the near future. Here it is, and a lot of work went into this (going back and getting the actual design documents, using those documents to create a model, solving that model numerically, then comparing the results of that model with the navigation and doppler data). All this ends up with the result that if the thermal force is added, no anomalous acceleration remains. So, based on this, no new physics.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2305 A highly magnified candidate for a young galaxy seen when the Universe was 500 Myrs old
    Wei Zheng, et al.

    A good survey of a galaxy found at ~z 9.6. It is magnified more than 15 times normal and is one of the first objects at z > 9 that will be available for spectroscopic studies by the Webb Space Telescope.

    arXiv:1204.2308 Near-infrared observations of type Ia supernovae: The best known standard candle for cosmology
    L. Barone-Nugent, et al.

    About a year ago, there was a discussion about how well SN1a were really suited to being a standard candle. I mentioned a paper that brought up the point that SN1a, in IR, appeared to be very precise standard candles, but needed more investigation. This paper provides that investigation, and it appears that, yes, they are quite accurate in the near IR bands. Much less scatter in peak magnitude.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2327 Constraints on jet formation mechanisms with the most energetic giant outbursts in MS 0735+7421
    Shuang-Liang Li, Xinwu Cao

    My weekly example of mainstream science using magnetohydrodynamics. And, although this does include a nice example of the Blandford-Znajek process, it shows that the Blandford-Znajek process is not enough to produce the X-ray cavities.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.2499 Ultra-high energy cosmic ray correlations with Active Galactic Nuclei in the world dataset
    I. Rubtsov, I. I. Tkachev, A. D. Dolgov

    I didn’t think much of this at first. A quick paper,(3 pages) they note that a correlation between Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) and the direction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) had been found by various cosmic ray collaborations. The authors find that if the various different experimental energy levels are calibrated, the correlations drop from 9 of 13 or 28 of 84 to a expected random 3 of 21. A cautionary tale of making sure your statistics are correlated.
    Tensor. Liked the Pioneer Anomaly paper. Much more reasonable explanation than a lot of the other theories out there. Nice job. pete

  16. #166
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,238
    Quote Originally Posted by trinitree88 View Post
    Tensor. Liked the Pioneer Anomaly paper. Much more reasonable explanation than a lot of the other theories out there. Nice job. pete
    Thanks Pete. Good to know people are looking at my choices.

  17. #167
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,238
    There were 70 papers today and only 40 of those were new with just 6 cross posted, leaving 34 replacements. There were several papers on dust, gas, and molecular clouds, all coming in at different perspectives. A couple on pulsars, again from differnt perspective, and finally, several on AGN or quasars, talking about their spectra and/or jets. As always, those who want to check out these and the other papers can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3919 No evidence of dark matter in the solar neighborhood
    Moni Bidin, G. Carraro, R. A. Mendez, R. Smith

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3924 Kinematical and chemical vertical structure of the Galactic thick disk II. A lack of dark matter in the solar neighborhood
    Moni Bidin, G. Carraro, R. A. Mendez, R. Smith

    These could be interesting. The first is a quick essay of the conclusions of the second. The authors believe they have developed a better way to account for the mass density in the area around the solar system. They conclude that the mass density agrees with currently accounted for matter. It will be fun to see how this goes, as they make quite a few assumptions. Those assumptions look reasonable, but well see. This is already being discussed in this thread

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3923 Mutual Events in the Cold Classical Transneptunian Binary System Sila and Nunam
    M. Grundy et al.

    I found this one interesting, simply because of all the information on transneptunian objects. The different classifications, how they classify them, how many that have been found, etc. Along with the information on the two named objects.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3955 The Transiting Circumbinary Planets Kepler-34 and Kepler-35
    William F. Welsh et al.

    Tatooine these planets aren’t. These are gas giants orbiting a different pair of binary stars. Along with Kepler-16, these indicate there could be, conservatively, more than a million planets orbiting binary stars in stable orbits. Perhaps we’ll eventually find a we’ll be able to live on and we’ll be able to see a double sunset, as visible on Tattooine.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.3925 Double bow shocks around young, runaway red supergiants: application to Betelgeuse
    Jonathan Mackey, Shazrene Mohamed, Hilding R. Neilson, Norbert Langer, Dominique M.-A. Meyer

    This could be interesting. The authors claim that Betelgeuse, just recently, transitioned from a Blue Supergiant(BSG), to a Red Supergiant(RSG). This is based on the observed bow shock. The BSG wind crashing into the Interstellar Medium and the RSG wind crashing into both. This, according to the authors, is only visible for the frist 30k years after the transition to a RSG.

  18. #168
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ocean Shores, Wa
    Posts
    5,224

    Papersy for Friday, April 20 2012

    If last week's theme seemed to be papers that support current galaxy formation theories, this week seems to be running full steam in the opposite direction:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4194 [b/]CANDELS: Correlations of SEDs and Morphologies with Star-formation Status for Massive Galaxies at z ~ 2 Challenges the merger theory for very large galaxy formation; while this paper:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4184 A fundamental problem in the theory of low mass galaxy evolution? runs into problems with the contrary evolution of star forming regions and halo (dark matter) content.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4196 The Nature of the Compton-thick X-ray Reprocessor in NGC 4945 It is not to surprising to conclude Compton thick X-ray sources are beamed; it is interesting to note that there will be a tendency to identify a high number of these sources in automated surveys: Another selection effect to be dealt with.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4219 An Absence of Neutrinos Associated with Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts Another theory bites the dust? The Ice Cube Array; so far; is one of the great null result telescopes - null not in the sense that it does not work, there is good calibration of neutrino sources relative to the moon, but null in detecting what certain theories demand.

    Supernova Paper of the day>=:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4358 Two distributions shedding light on supernova Ia progenitors: delay times and G-dwarf metallicities For some time it has been suspected that both single and double progenitors exist for supernova events with the type Ia spectral signature. This study models delay times for double and single events, then looks at the delay time to detonation. Looking at their histograms, I would have a difficult time reaching the same conclusions that they do.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4421 The Swift BAT Survey Detects Two Optical Broad Line, X-ray Heavily Obscured Active Galaxies: NVSS 193013+341047 and IRAS 05218-1212 This is fun because rather than a derth of local active galaxies, we are finding the local sample is dust enshrouded - viewing angle seems to be very important: We have to be looking right down the barrel to find Quasars.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4267 Magnetometry of a sample of massive stars in Carina Where ever there is polarization, there is strong magnetic fields. Sometimes the polarization is off-scale, and seems to be the case with strong X-ray emitters. There is polarization found in some less-obvious sources, too.

    Finally:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4265 Evolution of active galactic nuclei Or non-evolution of AGN; if you down-select to similar sized objects; or as the authors state: "Summarizing, there exists a remarkably uniform set of spectral characteristics that defines active nuclei at all epochs in the history if the universe, at least if we consider objects of a fixed total (bolometric) luminosity."

    Do galaxies spin-up or spin-down over cosmic time? Neither - according to this study:

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4236 The spin of late-type galaxies at redshifts $z\le 1.2$
    Last edited by Jerry; 2012-Apr-20 at 10:04 PM.

  19. #169
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 23 April 2012

    There are 54 papers today, not counting replacements. This includes about half a dozen papers in a series about the proper motions of the guide stars for Gravity Probe B.

    Topics: THE SUN, SGR A-star, STARLESS CORES, UHECRs FROM CEN A

    *THE SUN*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4449 Three to four billion years ago the Sun was less bright. This paper looks at the possible explanations for how the Earth wasn't frozen over.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4448 The Swedish 1-meter Solar Telescope is being used to measure fine details of the red and blue shifting of gasses in the atmosphere enabling realistic modeling in 3D of the magnetohydrodynamics in the Chromosphere.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4601 Stereo is beign used to get high quality 3D images of CMEs, from which we are able to make much higher accuracy estimates as to the mass and energy in these CMEs.

    *SGR A-star*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4454 We are a small number of years away from having high enough resolution capabilities in mm-wave radio to be able to observe the accretion disk around Sgr A*. This paper looks at what we might be able to see IF the accretion disk is NOT aligned with the rotation of the black hole.

    *STARLESS CORES*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4486 Sharpless 2-157 is a collection of gas, dust, and HII regions (Hydrogen plasma). Embedded in this are starless cores and protostars which are being observed with arcsecond resolution in the 1.4mm range. I am drawn to these forming star stories. I look forward to when we can observe closely enough that over a few decades we can see how quickly these cores and protostars are growing.

    *UHECRs from CEN A*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4500 Centaurus A is a nearby giant elliptical galaxy in the Southern Sky. It is one of the few known sources for ultra high energy cosmic rays. This paper looks at the various mechanism for producing photons and CRs that the monstrous accreting black hole in its center is using, based on the apparent spectrum of stuff we see from it.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  20. #170
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,185
    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 24 Apr 2012

    Categories: GEOMETRY, EXOPLANETS, MISC, FRINGE SCIENCE


    This week had lots of exoplanet papers! There were also a few geometry related papers which caught my eye. This week is rounded off by a couple sweet little papers, and a quantum psychology paper which is stupid but kind of funny in a way.

    ---

    GEOMETRY

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4896 - Selective sweeps in growing microbial colonies

    This paper is about the geometry of competing microbes growing with different competitive advantages. Among other things, it's possible to estimate the competitive advantage of a faster growing strain from snapshots. This paper includes lots of nice pictures, including geometrical pictures, simulations, and experimental photos. While this paper is about microbes on a petri dish, I can't help but envision applying this to aliens colonizing a galaxy (especially robotic VN machines).


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4941 - Rotating strings

    This mathematics paper provides exact solution cubic equations for an idealized string rotating about a fixed axis. As the author notes, considering how many thin string problems have been tackled by mathematicians great and small, and how many variants on rotating string problems have been studied for various practical problems, it seems miraculous that a solution to the bare-bones problem has not yet been published. Well, maybe the author is mistaken and someone else has already published these findings. Maybe not. Either way, it's a nice problem that's easy to understand and with obvious practical applications. It's nice that there's a formulaic exact solution.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4952 - Sculptures in S3

    This paper simply shows some sculptures made by taking various geometrical patterns on the hypersphere and applying a stereographic projection onto 3 space. Of these, my favorite is the 120-Cell, since it's a packing of the most beautiful polyhedron (the regular dodecahedron), and the dodecahedron ALMOST tesselates 3 space.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4950 - Helical mode conversion using conical reflector

    This paper shows that a conical reflector with a 45 degree half angle will change the spin direction of a helical wavefront. They say helical wavefronts are of recent interest for various things like manipulating atoms. I'm not familiar with the science myself, but even so I find this paper interesting purely on a geometrical level.

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4789 - A NEW TYPE OF AMBIGUITY IN THE PLANET AND BINARY INTERPRETATIONS OF CENTRAL PERTURBATIONS OF HIGH-MAGNIFICATION GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENTS

    Uh oh! This paper details a sort of binary star system microlensing event which looks almost exactly like a planet microlensing event. Unfortunately, two OGLE events match this profile, so they conclude that such degeneracies should be common. This paper features a lot of nice pictures demonstrating the problem in a way that's easy for lay people like myself to grasp.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4833 - Extrasolar planets in stellar multiple systems

    This paper surveys exoplanets detected by radial and transit methods, and determines relationships between the planetary system stats vs the existence and distance of nearest stellar companion. Unsurprisingly, there were no multi-planet systems unless the nearest companion was 100+ AU away, and there were no planets at all with binaries of less than 10AU separation. It's nice to have actual numbers to back up this intuitive notion.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5035 - RAPID COAGULATION OF POROUS DUST AGGREGATES OUTSIDE THE SNOW LINE: A PATHWAY TO SUCCESSFUL ICY PLANETESIMAL FORMATION

    This paper is dense but it also has some pictures. Like the title says, it demonstrates a pathway to the formation of icy planetesimals. Even if you aren't directly interested in iceballs beyond the snow line, they may be critical for bringing water to inner system habitable planets after the they have cooled down enough.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5037 - Herschel images of Fomalhaut: An extrasolar Kuiper Belt at the height of its dynamical activity

    Unless you've been living under a rock, you already know about the recent theory that Fomalhaut's belt is a shooting gallery of cometary collisions. This paper is about this theory, and has lots of pretty Herschel images along with graphs and data.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5063 - FORMATION OF LOW-MASS STARS AND BROWN DWARFS

    This paper discusses various current theories on the formation of low mass stars and brown dwarfs. This sort of resource is awesome for a layman like me, who doesn't already know everything from primary sources. And of course, I'm going to list it anyway since I'm interested in anything "brown dwarf". I do wonder if any of these theories scale down to the level of "rogue planets".

    ---

    MISC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4937 - Optical extinction in a single layer of nanorods

    This paper details nanorod membrane structures capable of blocking nearly 100% of light. Obviously, this may have applications for optical and optomechanical systems. The paper includes nice pictures and graphs of the theoretical vs experimental performance.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4765 - String trees

    This short sweet paper describes a compact way to encode unlabelled rooted trees in a string of length n, with a 2 bit alphabet (four letters). Very clever, and very manipulable!

    ---

    FRINGE SCIENCE

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4914 - Quantum Interference in Cognition: Structural Aspects of the Brain - Diederik Aerts and Sandro Sozzo

    Wow. Is this the sort of stuff which goes through the skulls of Quantum Psychology believers? This paper takes a bunch of fruits and vegetables and plots them on a 2d graph based on survey results of whether the participants called them fruits or vegetables. And then uses some weird mumbo jumbo math to show that an interference pattern explains the results better than a simple average. The conclusion? Aha! There must be a "quantum conceptual thought" layer superposed on top of a "classical logical thought" layer. How does anyone even think up this garbage?

    Anyway, this paper is good for a laugh. On one end of the scale, basic quantum psychology "theory" is mostly just annoying--wrong enough to be utterly dismissed, but just plausible enough that it's hard to articulate what's wrong to a layman. On the other end of the scale is pseudoscience nonsense which is so utterly incoherent that it hurts your brain just trying to read it. This paper falls in the middle--stupid enough to poke holes in, but coherent enough that there's something there to press against.

  21. #171
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 25 April 2012

    There are 44 papers today, not counting replacements. There was a somewhat heavier concentration of papers on Dark Matter.

    Topics: MUON MYSTERY, VOID GALAXIES, MW HALO, UEDs & HIGGS, BEGINNING?

    *MUON MYSTERY*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5180 There are 1.3 TeV muons coming into Gran Sasso. They've been being detected for 20 years. They seem to have about a 3% variation in frequency over the course of the year, peaking in June or July. Their frequency might also be connected to the Solar magnetic cycle, but its not clear how. It's also not clear why this energy... Very mysterious.

    *VOID GALAXIES*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5185 Most galaxies we see are in walls and and clusters at the intersections of walls, but some galaxies are in less populated parts of the universe that we call voids. This paper looks at 60 galaxies that we can easily observe and measure in the nearby voids, including looking at their sizes, masses, and kinematics. Generally, they are all smaller and less massive than the Milky Way. Mass is smaller by one to three orders of magnitude. These are interesting because they haven't done a lot of merging.

    *ANISOTROPY of the MILKY WAY HALO*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5189 A few days ago, there was a much publicised paper about how there might be no, or little dark matter in our part of the Milky Way, based on observing the motion of Red Giants. This paper makes similar measurements with Blue Giants further out into the out reaches of the galaxy to estimate the density and isotropy of the extended dark matter halo... and they come to very different conclusions that last week's paper.

    *UEDs and HIGGS*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5186 This paper looks at Kaluza-Klein Higgs Bosons (maybe at about 2 TeV) as a good candidate for Dark Matter... but one that would be very difficult for us to observe, create, or detect in any way except gravity.

    *BEGINNING?*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5385 This caught my eye because of the celebrity author. Leonard Susskind has written a four page letter responding to someone's recent claim that there MUST have been a beginning.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  22. #172
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,238
    There were 78 papers today and of those there e were 43 new and just 5 cross posted, leaving 38 replacements. There were quite a few papers on molecular clouds and the measurement and detection of dark matter. Along with a few on stellar formation and the clouds the proto stars are located in. As always, those who want to check out other papers can find them here


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5614 On the Variations of Fundamental Constants and AGN feedback in the QSO host galaxy RXJ0911.4+0551 at z=2.79
    Weiss, F. Walter, D. Downes, C. L. Carilli, C. Henkel, K. M. Menten, P. Cox

    Using a new method, the authors were able to measure ∆α/α. Their measurement of the change in the Fine Structure Constant is consistent with no variation going back 11.3 Billion years. What makes this interesting is the following comment: “We thank the referee, John Webb, for useful comments that helped to improve the manuscript.” John Webb is part of the group that claims to have detected a variation in α, with an angular dipole distribution. Since the measurement in this paper is orthogonal to the anisotropy, this doesn’t yet constrain the findings from Webb’s group.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5484 Distances to Dark Clouds: Comparing Extinction Distances to Maser Parallax Distances
    Jonathan B. Foster, Joseph J. Stead, Robert A. Benjamin, Melvin G. Hoare, James M. Jackson

    Finding another method to verify and calibrate distances using two different methods. One, using the VLBI to find the distances to known masers using parallax and then calibrate that distance using extinction in the near infrared.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5493 Observational Evidence of the Accelerated Expansion of the Universe
    Pierre Astier, Reynald Pain

    This survey simply goes over the observational evidence for the accelerated expansion. It doesn’t explain specify models, just presents the observational evidence any model has to account for, to be considered viable. Since we tend to get a lot of complaints about current theories, this pretty much sets the bar for any other theories.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5522 Multi-physics simulations using a hierarchical interchangeable software interface
    Simon Portegies Zwart, Steve McMillan, Arjen van Elteren, Inti Pelupessy, Nathan de Vries

    This papers talks about creating a general purpose interface, allowing various different simulation packages to be integrated and be usable at different scales. Or, if needed, for new simulations to be coded in a variety of coding languages. As simulations are becoming a large part of astrophysical research(along with the coding needed) this holds out promise to reduce coding time allow the reuse of previously coded modules.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5503 Discovery of Crystallized Water Ice in a Silhouette Disk in the M43 Region
    Hiroshi Terada, Alan T. Tokunaga

    The title pretty much says it all. The authors find that the detection of the crystalized water ice requires an inclination of the disk to be between 65 and 75 degrees, wrt our line of sight.

  23. #173
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ocean Shores, Wa
    Posts
    5,224

    Friday April 27 Papers

    49 new submissions -

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5747 A Monte Carlo Markov Chain based investigation of black hole spin in the active galaxy NGC3783 Sometimes the title misses on the theme: this paper is about a simulation that enhances iron abundance on the edges of an accretion zone; a model developed more-or-less to explain unexpected levels of iron content in quasars. It is interesting to know that such a model can be developed.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5753 Detection of dark galaxies and circum-galactic filaments fluorescently illuminated by a quasar at z=2.4 This paper highlights a clever observation technique: Cosmic back-lighting. It is interesting in the light of Neried's work on red galaxy drop-out. Dark galaxies, or rather normal little attenuated red ones?

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5990 Detection of Semi-Major Axis Drifts in 54 Near-Earth Asteroids: New Measurements of the Yarkovsky Effect A new 'Pioneer' Anomaly? Near earth asteroids are usually well behaved; but a few just seem to drift more than they should. There could be a lot of reasons; but it certainly would be interesting to run a couple more NEAR missions out there to study these cureosities a little further.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6024 This paper is fun because it talks about the complexities in the manufacturing process necessary for a precise WHIMP detector using isotope-free argon. This is a very challenging technical project to detect something that may not exist.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.5928 Search for neutrino emission from gamma-ray sources with the Antares Telescope
    This is new old news: We still haven't identified any cosmic neutrino sources. Ouch!

  24. #174
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 30 April 2012

    There are 51 papers today, not counting replacements.
    Topics: *DISTANCE SCALE, M83 STARS, 130 GeV, ARGON, ALT TO INFLATION, ALGOL*

    *DISTANCE SCALE*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6044 Distance scales in the nearby universe are important, and every paper that claims to improve them catches my attention. This one is doubly catchy because it claims to refine limits on f(R) gravity.

    *M83 STARS*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6045 The Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 was used to image various regions of M83, and was able to image about fifteen thousand individual bright stars... leading to a greater knowledge of the details of matter distribution and ages of those parts of the nearby spiral galaxy.

    *130 GeV not DM*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6047 The Fermi Probe has detected an excess of photons at about 130 GeV from near the center of the galaxy... this is not really news. It has been speculated that this might be a sign of annihilation of Dark Matter particles. This paper looks at where these are coming from, and correlates them to the giant bubbles, which suggests strongly that the source is NOT Dark Matter, but rather some more mundane astrophysical process.

    *ARGON*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6061 For certain kinds of deep underground detectors (Dark Matter, Neutrinos, etc) it would be helpful to have big tanks of Argon, or bricks of frozen Argon... except that some natural Argon is an unstable isotope with a long half-life. This is a note about getting a budget to distill Argon to create large amounts of low-radioactive Argon.

    *ALT TO INFLATION*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6108 This paper looks at details of two of the better understood alternatives to Guth-style inflation, in particular: "Matter Bounce", and "String Gas Cosmology". The paper offers that both of these can lead to the same observations of the CMB that we now attribute to inflation. Is it true? I didn't follow the details on my first skim of the paper well enough to verify, but I'll be reading it again in more detail in a few hours.

    *ALGOL IN EGYPT*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6206 I like the history of astronomy. This paper looks at what appears to be measurements of the dimming of Algol made three millenia ago. These measurements suggest that the period used to be about half a percent shorter than it is now. I don't know how seriously to take this, because I haven't looked at the measurements yet, but the idea of this study appeals to my inner historian.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  25. #175
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,424
    Some interesting abstracts of the new week, 4/30/2012.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6283 ROPS: A New Search for Habitable Earths in the Southern Sky
    Using the 6.5m Magellan Clay (south) telescope, and an absorption cell, astronomers can measure radial velocities of red M dwarfs with a precision of 10-50 m/s. Good enough to detect Neptune/Uranus-like objects, a nice step forward.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6206 Did the ancient egyptians record the period of the eclipsing binary Algol - the Raging one?
    The abstract claims that the ancient Egyptians may have noticed the variation of Algol and measured its period. I'd really like to read this one!

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6109 Light Curve Modeling of Superluminous Supernova 2006gy: Collision between Supernova Ejecta and Dense Circumstellar Medium
    SN 2006gy was a very, very luminous event which evolved much more slowly than most supernovae. This paper attributes its unusual behavior to the interaction of ejecta from the explosion with circumstellar material, most likely left over from mass loss earlier in the star's life.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6063 The search for habitable worlds: 1. The viability of a starshade mission
    Haven't you heard of the starshade idea? Put a big opaque object in space, far from the Earth, and place it EXACTLY between the Earth and a distant star. Then observe the distant star with a telescope on the ground. If everything is arranged properly, the object can block light from the star, allowing astronomers to detect even Earth-like planets orbiting the star. Sounds crazy, but check out this paper and see for yourself.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6045 The Resolved Stellar Population in 50 Regions of M83 from HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations
    These detailed observations of a nearby galaxy with the new WFC3 instrument provide very detailed views of stars and clusters. Note this sentence in the abstract: We also find that young stars are much more likely to be found in concentrated aggregates along spiral arms, while older stars are more dispersed. This idea is stated in many textbooks, but we could some (more) solid data to support it.

  26. #176
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,185
    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 1 May 2012

    Categories: PREDICTIONS, GEOMETRY, PLANETS AND BROWN DWARFS, MISC, COSMOLOGY


    This week had a LOT of fun papers, making my decision of which one to put at the top a difficult one. (On Google+ and Facebook, the first paper is highlighted with a direct link.)

    The finalists included another paper on Roman Dodecahedra and a paper with a graph of Les Miserable of all things (missing poor Eponine!).

    Ultimately, I decided upon an incisive paper critical of the "Predicting X from Twitter" fad. It combines biting humor with an earnest exposition on good science vs bad science.

    ---

    PREDICTIONS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6441 - I Wanted to Predict Elections with Twitter
    and all I got was this Lousy Paper


    This extremely fun paper is wildly critical of the "Predicting X from Twitter" fad, and offers constructive suggestions on how to do it right and how to approach the challenges.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6412 - Predicting the outcome of roulette

    This paper, which includes nice pictures, is about predicting the outcome of roulette using a simple model of initial position, velocity, and acceleration. They find that their techniques could produce a return of 18% (as opposed to the -2.7% return of a random bet). If you don't see the potential appeal of this...well, nevermind.

    ---

    GEOMETRY

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6497 - A Roman Dodecahedron for measuring distance

    Previously, I reviewed a paper suggesting Roman dodecahedra were used for a Bocce-like game. This paper suggests they were used to estimate distances. The idea is that the angular size of an object could be determined by viewing through the dodecahedron. Each pair of opposite sides has circular holes of different sizes, resulting in different cone angles. I don't know, though...seems pretty complicated compared to a simple cross-staff.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6328 - Supplementary information for Selective sweeps in
    growing microbial colonies


    This is supplementary info for a paper I reviewed last week: http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.4896

    These papers are about the geometry of competing microbes as they expand outward. As I noted last week, I can't help but ponder applying the same tools to aliens/machines colonizing a galaxy.

    ---

    PLANETS AND BROWN DWARFS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6360 - An optimal Mars Trojan asteroid search strategy

    They had me at the title! This paper shows the optimal directions to look for Mars Trojan asteroids (from Earth or near Earth). So far, there are only three known Mars Trojans.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6322 - SHARP ECCENTRIC RINGS IN PLANETLESS HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF DEBRIS DISKS

    This paper simulates debris disks, including the effects of second generation gas. The paper includes a lot of pretty pictures, making the various concepts easy to see. The bottom line is that the gas hydrodynamics result in clumping and shepherding effects, resulting in structures that are thought of as evidence of planets--but without any planets.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6320 - Discovery of Three Distant, Cold Brown Dwarfs in the WFC3
    Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels Survey


    Nothing earth shattering here. Just three cool brown dwarfs. But of course, I find all brown dwarfs cool.

    ---

    MISC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6376 - THE LANDSCAPE OF COMPLEX NETWORKS

    This paper is about graphs, and introduces a concept of "landscape" for them. I don't grok the graph theory, but this paper includes a cool graph of the landscape of a subnet of Les Miserables. Les Miserables! Interestingly (to me), this subnet includes all of the main characters except for poor Eponine. (The Les Miserables subnet also includes many minor characters.)


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6411 - Catroid: A Mobile Visual
    Programming System for Children


    Catroid is a cutesy visual programming language for children, designed for tablets. Give me a keyboard and a glorified text editor, but I can see the utility of this sort of thing for introducing programming.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6654 - Entangled granular media

    This paper considers the properties of a pile of "U" shaped steel staples. This is meant to provide insight into the properties of various biological and non-biological materials composed of non-convex particles. This paper gives some graphs of collapse dynamics under vertical vibration. Obviously, this is an extremely simplified model compared to typical real world examples, but you've got to make some simplifying assumptions to get anywhere with this sort of complex problem.
    ---

    COSMOLOGY

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1204.6108 - Do we have a Theory of Early Universe Cosmology?

    This paper discusses various cosmology theories ranging from the inflationary model to "matter bounce" and "string gas cosmology". The author argues that various conceptual problems with inflation should prevent us from definitively regarding inflation to be proven, and that the challenges with these other alternative models aren't worse.

    Honestly, I don't understand cosmology well enough to know how interesting or odd this is to cosmologists. I found the paper interesting, though, with various time-space diagrams helpful in getting the idea of the three alternative theories discussed.

  27. #177
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    20,091
    From 02 May 2012

    There are 37 papers today, not counting replacements.
    Topics: *TRIPLE MERGER, M31 AT 20 CM, COOLING SGR, LOW-MASS SMBH*

    *TRIPLE MERGER*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0052 There's more to this paper than I'm picking up on the first pass, but the basics are this: galaxy cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 is at z=0.55, and is actually three galaxy cluster colliding. This paper used SZ effect as observed in three wavelengths, and a powerful simulation tool to crank out images and distribution maps.

    *M31 AT 20 CM*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0066 The VLA was used for an extensive study at 20cm to look at point and extended sources within M31. The resulting images are a little odd to look at, but their very nature tells me a lot about this relatively long wavelength... which itself is going to be important for studies with the SKA looking back before z=10.

    *COOLING SGR*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0091 Soft Gamma Repeaters are neutron stars. This paper looks at the cooling of these objects over nine years.

    *LOW-MASS SMBH*
    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0230 NGC 4178 is a spiral galaxy with very little central bulge... and a very litle central black hole. It appears to be only 10,000 to 100,000 solar masses. This is the smallest central black hole known, and will set some limits on our understanding of how they formed.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  28. #178
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,238
    There were 63 papers today and of those there e were 47 new and just 4 cross posted, leaving only 12 replacements. Several papers on cosmic rays, several on blazars, several on other AGN, and several others on VLBA measurements. As always, those who want to check out other papers can find them here


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0363 Accretion, Growth of Supermassive Black Holes, and Feedback in Galaxy Mergers
    Li-Xin Li

    A model for a solution to the problem of high mass > 109 M⊙ black holes at redshifts > 6. Basically the black hole alternates between Super and sub Eddington accretion while increasing and decreasing it's angular momentum. The rate of which controls the accretion rate.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0353 SN 2009kn - The Twin of the Type IIn SN 1994W
    Kankare, et al

    A comparison of the two supernovae. Although it says twin, there are some differences. The decline plateaus are a bit different and the declines after the plateaus are quite a bit steeper with 1994W. 2009kn also shows a decline consistent with a 56NI breakdown.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0387 The properties of the 2175AA extinction feature discovered in GRB afterglows
    Tayyaba Zafar et al

    The Milky Way has a strong 2175 Å extinction feature in the optical spectra. This feature is weaker in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and even weaker in the Small Magellanic Cloud. And while this feature has been seen in other galaxies and systems, it is rare to see it in GRB afterglows. This paper looks into two recent GRB afterglows where the extinction feature was found. Indicating it was in the host galaxy.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0301 N-body Simulations of Satellite Formation around Giant Planets: Origin of Orbital Configuration of the Galilean Moons
    Masahiro Ogihara, Shigeru Ida

    This paper looks at planetary satellite formation. The authors are interested as the number of exo-satellites have been increasing and they want to verify their model. To do this, they attempt to simulate the formation of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0255 The Impact of Contaminated RR Lyrae/Globular Cluster Photometry on the Distance Scale
    Daniel J. Majaess, David G. Turner, Wolfgang P. Gieren, David J. Lane

    As RR Lyrae stars are used as standard candles (their period is related to their abosolute magnitude. They are special cases of Cephid Variables), measuring their absolute magnitude is very important. This paper looks at possible reduction of their magnitude due to dust and contamination of their photometrics, due to their location within globular clusters.

  29. #179
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ocean Shores, Wa
    Posts
    5,224

    Papers archived Friday, May 4.

    Strange. 52 first postings tonight, and I only found one that I thought was 'fun'.
    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1205.0647.pdf A simplified view of blazars: why BL Lacertae is actually a quasar in
    disguise
    Breaks down the blazer sequence into two broad catagories; also determines some of the prior studies are hampered by selection effects.

    I'm going to thumb through these again after I have had some rest and see if anything else pops out at me.

  30. #180
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,185
    How about this one?

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0589 - Is Eternal Inflation Past-Eternal? And What if It Is?

    This paper discusses arguments for and against there being a beginning, assuming a branching multi-verse model. The author presents the argument that there is, in order to refute it (in other words, he argues that there is no beginning). Even though I don't understand a lot of the basic cosmology terminology being used, I still found the paper readable and the concepts at least somewhat comprehensible. The de Sitter space diagrams helped a lot.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2011-Dec-14, 05:28 PM
  2. Why does arXiv ban people?
    By Noble Ox in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 2009-Nov-15, 07:02 PM
  3. Something Strange Going on at arxiv.org
    By Celestial Mechanic in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 2009-Jul-09, 01:33 PM
  4. Is anyone willing to support a BAUT member in arXiv?
    By john hunter in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2007-Aug-18, 10:28 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
here
The forum is sponsored in-part by: