Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 41

Thread: What is an Engineer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    14,459

    What is an Engineer

    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Wait a minute. Grant is an engineer:
    No, Grant's statement is probably right. "Engineer" is a protected term. He's only entitled to call himself one if he's licensed to be an engineer by (presumably) California.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    6,521
    Well, the reason that he said it was he was soldering a crystal to a stick, which in turn would be soldered a string connected to a rheostat. He was having some difficultly with making the stuff stay together.

    I think the statement was meant to ironic, considering his electronic/robotic skills, engineer or not.
    Solfe

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Triangles are my favorite shape
    "Three points where two lines meet"
    Tessellate, Alt-J

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    6,688
    Quote Originally Posted by Moose View Post
    No, Grant's statement is probably right. "Engineer" is a protected term. He's only entitled to call himself one if he's licensed to be an engineer by (presumably) California.
    Completely off topic: That's always been a major pet peeve of mine. I was a pretty good engineer for 20 years before I took the stinkin' exam. And passing didn't make me a better one. I really don't know why I bothered except that the company offered free tuition to the refresher course. I'm not sure why I'm keeping it up-to-date now that I've retired, either.

    Completely on topic: I'm with Henrik on the line wrap thing. That's a case of BREAKING something that didn't need fixing.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    7,808
    Quote Originally Posted by Moose View Post
    No, Grant's statement is probably right. "Engineer" is a protected term. He's only entitled to call himself one if he's licensed to be an engineer by (presumably) California.
    ... Or drives a train.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    In the neighborhood of Grover's Mill
    Posts
    2,600
    Quote Originally Posted by Moose View Post
    No, Grant's statement is probably right. "Engineer" is a protected term. He's only entitled to call himself one if he's licensed to be an engineer by (presumably) California.
    I don't think so. Professional Engineer is a "protected term" and requires licensing, but an engineering degree is sufficient to call yourself an engineer in these parts (not counting that train operator issue the Kaptain mentioned). My first job out of college was as an official US government "0855 Electrionics Engineer" and I didn't need a PE.

    Of course, other countries may have different rules.

    Back on topic, that is the worst wink ever!
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    6,688
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I don't think so. Professional Engineer is a "protected term" and requires licensing, but an engineering degree is sufficient to call yourself an engineer in these parts (not counting that train operator issue the Kaptain mentioned). My first job out of college was as an official US government "0855 Electrionics Engineer" and I didn't need a PE.

    Of course, other countries may have different rules.

    Back on topic, that is the worst wink ever!
    In this state, if you advertise yourself as an engineer, put it on your business card, or anything of the sort, the state board will come after you. Regardless of your education or expertise. I get their quarterly newsletter in which they report on doing just that. There's a loophole for engineers working for companies, where they are required to work under the "direct supervision" of a PE. They don't bother enforcing that, however. It might be humorous to see them going after Boeing if they found one of the many "Chiefs" wasn't a PE.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    5,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I don't think so. Professional Engineer is a "protected term" and requires licensing, but an engineering degree is sufficient to call yourself an engineer in these parts (not counting that train operator issue the Kaptain mentioned). My first job out of college was as an official US government "0855 Electrionics Engineer" and I didn't need a PE.
    Your location is listed as near Grover's Mill. If that's in New Jersey, then you are incorrect. If it's not NJ, then never mind.

    From the New Jersey State Board of Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors regulations:

    13:40-3.1 Licensure requirement; issuance and display
    of certificate; advertising
    (a) A person shall not use the title "professional engineer,"
    "engineer" or its substantial equivalent or otherwise represent
    to the public that the person is licensed to practice engineering
    in this State unless that person is licensed by the Board.


    Also:

    13:40-3_2 Licensure exemptions: acceptable measurements
    by professional engineers
    (aJ The following persons shall be exempt from the licensure
    requirements of N.J.A.C. 13:40-3.1:
    ...
    3. An employee or a subordinate of an individual holding
    a valid license issued by the Board or an employee of a
    person exempted from licensure by (a)1 or 2 above, provided
    that this practice does not include responsible charge
    of design or supervision;
    4. An officer or employee of the Government of the
    United States while engaged within this State in the practice
    of professional engineering or land surveying for that
    government;

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    In the neighborhood of Grover's Mill
    Posts
    2,600
    Thanks geonuc. "Engineer" is one of those terms that has an official meaning that is sometimes different from the common usage. (See any discussion of the term "theory" for a perfect example. ) There are engineers with a PE license, engineers with a degree but no license, the people who operate locomotives (who certainly must have some specialized certification) and the dreaded "tack the term engineer onto any thing you want" type of engineer (i.e., domestic engineer). If you're looking for an engineer, be sure to specify exactly what you are looking for.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    38,550
    These posts have been split off the software upgrade thread. There were a couple of transitional posts I left behind.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    38,550
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaptain K View Post
    ... Or drives a train.
    That makes me think of this Utah Phillips song.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,076
    Partial definition:
    An engineer is someone who can take the dreams of a PhD Theorist, and turn them into reality; sometimes with much cursing of said Theorist in the process.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    5,682
    actually, it is an experimentalist that turns the dreams into reality, then the engineer makes them useful

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    6,521
    My wife always says "Nurses and Engineers have schizophrenic children."

    I am not exactly why she says that as her dad is an engineer and her mom is a nurse. Maybe she was trying to scare me off?
    Solfe

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Triangles are my favorite shape
    "Three points where two lines meet"
    Tessellate, Alt-J

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    23,757
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    My wife always says "Nurses and Engineers have schizophrenic children."

    I am not exactly why she says that as her dad is an engineer and her mom is a nurse. Maybe she was trying to scare me off?
    My mom is an Operating Room RN, my father a nuclear engineer (both now retired). But I turned out perfectly fine (by the way, I posed for that wink smilie.)
    I'm a cynical optimist. I think the only way out is through, but once we get through it'll be better. Very different, but better. Howard Tayler

    It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. Charles Darwin

    "It is the duty of the writers to seduce me into suspending my disbelief!" Paul Beardsley

    Power, Lord Acton says, corrupts. Not always. What power always does is reveal. Robert A. Caro

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    18,197
    I think it's a fairly common combination, I'm the offspring of a nurse and an engineer as well,
    __________________________________________________
    Reductionist and proud of it.

    Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn. Benjamin Franklin
    Chase after the truth like all hell and you'll free yourself, even though you never touch its coat tails. Clarence Darrow
    A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read. Mark Twain

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,014
    Engineer married to nurse here. Our 3 grown children are all fine but none of them are even remotely involved in engineering or nursing. Maybe that's necessary. Shall we split off another thread?

    In most states you can't get a PE license until you have 5 years of experience anyway. What are you until then?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    4,217
    They can do for a shilling what any
    fool can do for a pound!

    No I dont understand it either.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    In the neighborhood of Grover's Mill
    Posts
    2,600
    Quote Originally Posted by peteshimmon View Post
    They can do for a shilling what any
    fool can do for a pound!

    No I dont understand it either.

    I'd never hear this saying before, but have an idea of what it means.

    Quite a bit of an engineer's job is optimization. I can over-design a deck for my house, but a PE can tell me how strong the beams really need to be. My deck will cost a pound to the engineer's shilling, because my structure will be overly conservative in design.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    In the neighborhood of Grover's Mill
    Posts
    2,600
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    My wife always says "Nurses and Engineers have schizophrenic children."
    I don't know about that, but I've heard that Asperger's syndrome is common in engineers.

    The Engineer's Disease

    I wonder how common Autism is in children of engineer parents.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    The Wild West
    Posts
    7,600
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    ....but a PE can tell me how strong the beams really need to be.
    I think you'd be safer with an SE on that job.
    Last edited by Cougar; 2011-Oct-06 at 01:30 PM. Reason: link
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    In the neighborhood of Grover's Mill
    Posts
    2,600
    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar View Post
    I think you'd be safer with an SE on that job.
    PE refers to being licensed, so I'd probably want an SE with a PE license.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    6,688
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    PE refers to being licensed, so I'd probably want an SE with a PE license.
    Or, in this state, a PE who has sat the supplemental Structural exam.

    I've been told I build my catapult frames too light. At least the latest one. It hasn't broken yet so I figure it's probably too heavy.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    3,594
    In the UK we really messed up a couple of centuries ago so anybody can be an engineer. To get to be a chartered engineer you need a degree in engineering plus industrial experience and a sponsor to confirm your professional attitude but having done that there is no exclusivity under the law. In germany the equivalent is Dipl. Ing and to be in charge of an engineering project you have to be one in Germany. It's too late now to put it right. (End of rant)

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    6,521
    That is pretty amazing that those two professions "hook up" so often. I am really going to ask my wife what she means by that.
    Solfe

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "Triangles are my favorite shape
    "Three points where two lines meet"
    Tessellate, Alt-J

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    5,285
    Quote Originally Posted by MAPNUT View Post
    In most states you can't get a PE license until you have 5 years of experience anyway. What are you until then?
    Engineer-in-Training (EIT), provided you've passed the exam for that.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    6,688
    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Engineer-in-Training (EIT), provided you've passed the exam for that.
    As I was 20 years out of college when I took it, I found that exam much tougher than the branch exam I took six months later. The EIT exam is (or was at that time) a general exam given to all types of engineers, including lots of stuff I'd forgotten because I simply hadn't needed it. Thank FSM for the refresher course and even more for the book that came with it, which I took to the test.

    At the Mechanical branch exam, I was worried about having to handle HVAC related questions -- not my field at all. I needn't have been. Although fully half the questions were HVAC, you only had to answer half the questions to complete the test!

    Net effect of getting licensed on my career: None whatsoever.
    Net effect on my life: Loss of time taken up by two tests and associated refreshers, and $75 every two years for maintenance. I'm sort of sorry I bothered.

    I think there's a new name instead of EIT now, but I don't remember what it is.

    ETA: The EIT is now called FE, for Fundamentals of Engineering. Apparently it's now closed-book, unlike when I took it, and is tailored to specific branches. Linky. I don't know what you call someone who's passed it these days.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    5,285
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    ETA: The EIT is now called FE, for Fundamentals of Engineering. Apparently it's now closed-book, unlike when I took it, and is tailored to specific branches. Linky. I don't know what you call someone who's passed it these days.
    I believe you're still called an Engineer-in-Training.

    You're right about the EIT exam. I describe it as "Design the universe. Show your work."

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    a long way away
    Posts
    8,524
    I was really surprised by this thread (as an engineer) as I was completely unaware of such requirements. Even though I worked for a while in the US.

    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    In the UK we really messed up a couple of centuries ago so anybody can be an engineer.
    The wikipedia article linked earlier says that qualifications in the UK include "having a driving license, being physically fit, and not being color blind". That is setting the bar pretty high

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    9,568
    Thank you, members of cosmoquest forum, you are a part of my life I value.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    6,688
    In the airplane biz we called that "dual load path". Can be a real pain in the empennage but sometimes saves lives.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

Similar Threads

  1. Anybody here a mechanical engineer?
    By Luckeydavid in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 2009-Jun-19, 09:45 AM
  2. Engineer jokes
    By ToSeek in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 2008-May-07, 08:16 PM
  3. Astroquestions from an engineer.
    By jserrano in forum Astronomy
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 2007-Mar-30, 09:47 PM
  4. Engineer a Human
    By AitchJay in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: 2006-Jun-19, 11:18 PM
  5. A Well-Known NASA Engineer's Opinion of the STS
    By Dave Mitsky in forum Space Exploration
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2003-Dec-20, 06:12 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
here
The forum is sponsored in-part by: