Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Three habitable planets in our solar system

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    62

    Three habitable planets in our solar system

    Would it have been possible for there to be three habitable Earth-like worlds in our solar system, and if so where would they have to be placed?

    Thanks in advance for any answers!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New Haven, Connecticut
    Posts
    7,062
    iirc, Mars, Earth, and Venus are within some definitions of the habitable zone, or liquid water zone (bad choice, that: water can remain liquid to about 647 K, which is probably too warm for life as we can currently conceive it): a larger Mars may have remained "habitable," while Venus could have remained so barring its runaway greenhouse.
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    iirc, Mars, Earth, and Venus are within some definitions of the habitable zone, or liquid water zone (bad choice, that: water can remain liquid to about 647 K, which is probably too warm for life as we can currently conceive it): a larger Mars may have remained "habitable," while Venus could have remained so barring its runaway greenhouse.
    Thanks. I was basically wondering how much further from the sun Venus would have to have been to avoid the runaway greenhouse effect and how much closer to the sun Mars would have to have been to not only be more massive (presuming that Jupiter is what caused Mars to be its current mass) but to avoid being a frozen world. If Venus was too close to Earth there could be some orbital issues, so I wasn't sure where to put Earth-mass Venus, Earth, and Mars in the "habitable zone" while avoiding runaway greenhouses, snowballs, and, of course, the effects of their gravitational pulls on one another leading to an eventual crash or ejection.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    457
    didn't Mars lose its atmosphere and thus its water not mainly because of its size, but because its core cooled and lost its magnetic field and hence its protection against the solar wind ?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    New Haven, Connecticut
    Posts
    7,062
    Quote Originally Posted by RAF_Blackace View Post
    didn't Mars lose its atmosphere and thus its water not mainly because of its size, but because its core cooled and lost its magnetic field and hence its protection against the solar wind ?
    Probably that and the ending of plate tectonics and the resulting end of geological cycling of carbon.
    Information about American English usage here and here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

Similar Threads

  1. which planets are the closest to see in the sky in our solar system?
    By Tenshu in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 2010-Aug-06, 04:13 PM
  2. How many planets in the Solar System?
    By SillyMidOff in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 2007-Jan-30, 12:06 PM
  3. How many planets are in the solar system?
    By Knowledge_Seeker in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 2006-Aug-01, 02:43 PM
  4. Mutiple habitable planets in a system
    By Z28Jerry in forum Space/Astronomy Questions and Answers
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 2006-Jul-24, 10:52 AM
  5. The solar system has 8-12 planets
    By ToSeek in forum Astronomy
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 2003-Mar-11, 02:30 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
here
The forum is sponsored in-part by: