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Thread: Global Sea Level Drops 6 mm in 2010 - Greater drop and early drop based on Euro Sat

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    Global Sea Level Drops 6 mm in 2010 - Greater drop and early drop based on Euro Sat

    I am not sure if there is or is not a mystery related to the abrupt sudden dropping in ocean level. This thread is intended to make BAUT readers aware of the issue and discussions.

    Likely subsequent research and papers will straighten out the reason for the sea level changes.

    There has been a significant amount of discussion concerning the drop in ocean level. The European satellite shows the drop in ocean level starting in around 2006.

    The NASA satellite GRACE I believe was adjusted up 2006 to 2008. The premise was that the greater mass of the ocean increased the depth of the ocean, therefore 0.3 mm has added to the ocean level to account for greater ocean depth. As it became apparent that ocean levels were continuing to fall the GRACE data was delayed for 5 months early 2011.

    At that time it was explained that greater precipitation resulted in increased water being deposited on the continents which resulted in ocean levels dropping. That seems odd, as one would think the water deposited on the continents would eventually flow to the ocean and result in a sudden increase in ocean level. Perhaps we should keep an eye on the ocean level data just for fun.

    There is some evidence that the oceans are cooling however I believe the cooling of the oceans does not explain the magnitude of the drop. (Note the warming of the oceans and ice sheet and glacial melt did not also explain the magnitude of the ocean rise.)
    http://www.pas.rochester.edu/~dougla...ress_final.pdf

    Recent energy balance of Earth

    Recently Lyman et al. [1] have estimated a robust global warming trend of 0.63 ± 0.28 W/m2 for Earth during 1993–2008, calculated from ocean heat content anomaly (OHC) data. This value is not representative of the recent (2003–2008) warming/cooling rate because of a “flattening” that occurred around 2001–2002. Using only 2003-2008 data, we find cooling, not warming. This result does not support the existence of a large frequently-cited positive computed radiative imbalance (see, for example, Trenberth and Fasullo [2])

    Hamburg - The sea level is falling behind in global average over the past twelve months by more than half a centimeter. Never before since satellite measurements 18 years ago the water level has dropped so significantly. The show global data from the University of Colorado in the United States . Were the cause of climate phenomena El Niño and La Niña, says Josh Willis of NASA researchers.
    http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/n...782324,00.html


    Huge amounts of water evaporate
    The new data, fueling the debate on how developed the rise of the oceans: Until 1993, the sea swelled by an average of 1.7 millimeters per year on - were based on data up to that tide gauges. Since 1993, however, the satellites measure ocean. They placed first be an increase of about three millimeters per year. In the past eight years, however, slowed the rise again.
    But especially the puzzle of "missing heat" makes for doubt : The oceans have not warmed for eight years, apparently. Experts can not explain the phenomenon, eventually would have to heat up in the wake of global warming, especially the oceans - and swell as a result. Downward fluctuations are expected, however, they were part of the normal climate cycle, Caroline Katsman and Geert Jan van from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Oldenborgh explain institutions now in the journal "Geophysical Research Letters .

    Ultimately, however, not the rain water remains on the continents, the researchers point out - it flowed slowly back into the sea. And would therefore be expected to reverse the trend soon, Willis says: "The increase will go to the seas." Numerous research projects are currently measure how quickly the levels rise.
    http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-08-...ad-higher.html

    Gobal Sea Level Drops 6 mm in 2010.

    http://sealevel.colorado.edu/content...ate-enso-index

    Envisat satellite data shows a greater fall in ocean level.


    http://www.aviso.oceanobs.com/filead...GIA_Adjust.png
    Last edited by William; 2011-Sep-05 at 02:22 PM. Reason: corrected link

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    La Nina conditions have returned, however, the predictions are for weak La Nina conditions.

    http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/wcp/wc...te_latest.html

    In summary:
    • A moderate to strong La Niña event ended in the middle of the second quarter of 2011;
    • Neutral conditions have prevailed from May to August, although a few weak remnants of La Niña features continued in the tropical Pacific atmospheric circulation;
    • During the most recent several weeks, some cooling has been observed in the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature and in the eastern Pacific subsurface sea temperature which, along with the associated atmospheric circulation patterns, indicate signs of a possible return to weak La Niña conditions;
    • Persistence of near-neutral conditions or the re-emergence of weak La Niña conditions are considered to be the possible scenarios for the remainder of 2011; development of El Niño is considered very unlikely.

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    Yes, it's interesting how that big La Nina redistributed water that way.

    I've translated the second last paragraph from the Spiegel article:

    With the help the German-American "GRACE" satellites, scientists could detect the water masses on the continents. The satellites measure the tiniest variations in acceleration, that is, the gravitation of the Earth. After the heavy rains, the satellites were more strongly pulled over Australia and the northeast of South America. It's in these areas that the water had accumulated, says NASA researcher Carmen Böning.
    And that's more-or-less the same as what is stated here.

    Envisat seems to show more variation as well as a flatter trend than the others (kind of the way UAH compares to RSS or the other temperature records). So while it dropped more last year, it also has higher peaks in other (mostly earlier?) years. And both Jason-1 and -2 are showing recent significant rises again in that last chart you linked.

    Chart as it appears at the time of this post:

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    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    I am not sure if there is or is not a mystery related to the abrupt sudden dropping in ocean level. This thread is intended to make BAUT readers aware of the issue and discussions.
    Likely subsequent research and papers will straighten out the reason for the sea level changes.

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    There has been a significant amount of discussion concerning the drop in ocean level. The European satellite shows the drop in ocean level starting in around 2006.
    What papers show this? After all, the graph YOU PRESENT at the end of your post shows, at worst, and only one data set, that the level rose after 2006 and has fallen the last year and a half. Other data sets indicate that the level is above the 2006 level. So, you claim one thing, then provide support for the opposite. Which is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    The NASA satellite GRACE I believe was adjusted up 2006 to 2008. The premise was that the greater mass of the ocean increased the depth of the ocean, therefore 0.3 mm has added to the ocean level to account for greater ocean depth.
    Are you claiming that this method is wrong? And if you are, can you show why you think it is wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    As it became apparent that ocean levels were continuing to fall the GRACE data was delayed for 5 months early 2011.
    Do you proof that the delay was due to the falling ocean levels?

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    At that time it was explained that greater precipitation resulted in increased water being deposited on the continents which resulted in ocean levels dropping. That seems odd, as one would think the water deposited on the continents would eventually flow to the ocean and result in a sudden increase in ocean level.
    Did you look at your own links? There are maps showing where there is extra water on continents. Along with why this happens. As a matter of fact, you yourself quote this latter in your own post. Cherry picking data from sources again?

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    There is some evidence that the oceans are cooling however I believe the cooling of the oceans does not explain the magnitude of the drop. (Note the warming of the oceans and ice sheet and glacial melt did not also explain the magnitude of the ocean rise.)
    Well, if you could explain why you think so, along with the actual papers, and point out WHERE in the actual paper, it may help. Until then, you are just making unsupported claims. For instance:

    The link doesn't work and you haven't explained why you think the oceans are cooling.

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    Recently Lyman et al. [1] have estimated a robust global warming trend of 0.63 ± 0.28 W/m2 for Earth during 1993–2008, calculated from ocean heat content anomaly (OHC) data. This value is not representative of the recent (2003–2008) warming/cooling rate because of a “flattening” that occurred around 2001–2002. Using only 2003-2008 data, we find cooling, not warming. This result does not support the existence of a large frequently-cited positive computed radiative imbalance (see, for example, Trenberth and Fasullo [2])
    Yeah, so? You know, durning the period 1998-1999 the earth cooled and also from 2005-2006. See, I can cherry pick a period to show cooling also. What is the overall trend? How does Lyman et al do from 1993 to 2010?

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    Hamburg - The sea level is falling behind in global average over the past twelve months by more than half a centimeter. Never before since satellite measurements 18 years ago the water level has dropped so significantly. The show global data from the University of Colorado in the United States . Were the cause of climate phenomena El Niño and La Niña, says Josh Willis of NASA researchers.
    Wrong. If you look at the graphs YOU PROVIDED links to below, there are several years that show a drop as great, if not greater. 1996 and 1998 show a drop of one and a half CM and 2000 and 2003 dropped one CM. By contrast, 2010 showed a drop of one CM and this year is down by 1/4 CM. Of course the drop this year is only in the Envisat data. The Jason-1 and Jason-2 show an increase.



    What quotes, exactly are this article supposed to be linked to anyway?

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    Huge amounts of water evaporate
    You do realize that large amounts of evaporation, due to warmer air being able to hold more moisture, is a sign of warming, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    The new data,

    Snip...

    institutions now in the journal "Geophysical Research Letters .
    You know, I couldn't find these quotes anywhere in your links. So, we just have to say, unsupported claims.

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    Ultimately, however, not the rain water remains on the continents, the researchers point out - it flowed slowly back into the sea. And would therefore be expected to reverse the trend soon, Willis says: "The increase will go to the seas." Numerous research projects are currently measure how quickly the levels rise.
    What I find funny about this quote, is that back at the beginning of your post, you expressed surprise that water on the continents could account for a lowering of the level of the oceans. And then you go and us a quote claiming just that? Refuting yourself?

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-08-...ad-higher.html

    Gobal Sea Level Drops 6 mm in 2010.
    Yeah, like I said, that article also shows where the water went. And the graphs you post links to below, show the water entering back into the oceans, and the level rising.

    I have no idea what this graph is supposed to show. Of course, without any kind of link to a paper describing methods, data reduction, and data verification, the graph is pretty much useless for serious claims.

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    Envisat satellite data shows a greater fall in ocean level.
    Funny how you ignore the Jason-1 and Jason-2 data, which shows the level rising by a half a CM this year.

    That graph, overall, shows that the rise of the ocean level is returning. Just as it has during each time there has been a slight fall in ocean level during the entire trend of the ocean level rising. There was even a couple of time where the ocean fell more than it did recently (1996, 2000). Basically, that graph refutes your whole line of reasoning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    La Nina conditions have returned, however, the predictions are for weak La Nina conditions.

    http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/wcp/wc...te_latest.html
    And, so? Also from that page:

    From about March to July 2011, tropical Pacific subsurface heat content became slightly warmer than normal, with implications for a possible transition to warm-neutral or even weak El Niño conditions for the remainder of the year.

    So, the water temperature was higher early in the year. But, it really shouldn't have been. From the US National Weather Service:

    ... the latest runs from the NCEP Climate Forecast System (CFS) models predict La Niña to re-develop during the fall (Fig. 7). This forecast is also supported by the ongoing La Niña-like tropical atmosphere, subsurface temperature trends, and the historical tendency for significant wintertime La Niña episodes to be followed by relatively weaker La Niña episodes the following winter.

    Even with the La Niña favorable conditions and historical nature of a weaker La Niña following a strong one, the early data suggested an El Niño could getting ready to start, weak though it may have been. In addition, there is the problem of higher than normal eastern Indian Ocean temperatures, which may affect western Pacific conditions.

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    I cannot speculate as to how quickly ocean level will rise again. Perhaps others writing in this thread would like to make a prediction.

    I will update this thread as more data becomes available or if I see a new paper.

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    Ahh could you please translate correctly if you want to use "der spiegel" as a scientific source?

    Quote Originally Posted by spiegel
    Hamburg - Der Meeresspiegel ist im weltweiten Durchschnitt in den vergangenen zwölf Monaten um mehr als einen halben Zentimeter gefallen. Nie zuvor seit Beginn der Satellitenmessungen vor 18 Jahren ist der Wasserstand so deutlich gesunken. Das zeigen globale Daten der University of Colorado in den USA. Ursache seien die Klimaphänomene El Niño und La Niña, erläutert der Nasa-Forscher Josh Willis.
    Over the last 12 months the sea level has decreased by half a centimeter on a worldwide average. Never since the beginning of satellite measurements 18 years ago did the waterlevel decrease so clearly. This is shown by global data from the University of Colorado, USA. The causes are the the climate phenomena El Nino and La Nina, explains NASA researcher Johs Willis.

    The paper that is dealing with the "missing heat" is here to which I have a subscription.

    Quote Originally Posted by abstract
    Over the period 2003–2010, the upper ocean has not gained any heat, despite the general expectation that the ocean will absorb most of the Earth’s current radiative imbalance. Answering to what extent this heat was transferred to other components of the climate system and by what process(‐es) gets to the essence of understanding climate change. Direct heat flux observations are too inaccurate to assess such exchanges. In this study we therefore trace these heat budget variations by analyzing an ensemble
    of climate model simulations. The analysis reveals that an 8‐yr period without upper ocean warming is not exceptional. It is explained by increased radiation to space (45%), largely as a result of El Niño variability on decadal timescales, and by increased ocean warming at larger depths (35%), partly due to a decrease in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Recently‐observed changes in these two large‐scale modes of climate variability point to an upcoming resumption of the upward trend in upper ocean heat content.
    Quote Originally Posted by William
    I will update this thread as more data becomes available or if I see a new paper.
    And what exactly are you going to achieve by this? Is there any use to you presenting another paper on this topic? Why is it always in these kind of discussions that your plan it "to wait for further papers that may or may not be published in the near future?"
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    http://www.pas.rochester.edu/~dougla...ress_final.pdf

    Recent energy balance of Earth

    Recently Lyman et al. [1] have estimated a robust global warming trend of 0.63 ± 0.28 W/m2 for Earth during 1993–2008, calculated from ocean heat content anomaly (OHC) data. This value is not representative of the recent (2003–2008) warming/cooling rate because of a “flattening” that occurred around 2001–2002. Using only 2003-2008 data, we find cooling, not warming. This result does not support the existence of a large frequently-cited positive computed radiative imbalance (see, for example, Trenberth and Fasullo [2])

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    I do not have an answer as to what data is or is not interesting or what subjects are or are not interesting.

    I do not know when the ocean level will start to rise again. It seems very straightforward to provide an update to the ocean level data in lets say 6 months or a year.

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    The effect of flooding on sea level

    Hi William and everybody else. An interesting explanation for this drop in sea level was put forth over at skepticalscience and JPL

    Link: http://www.skepticalscience.com/Extr...Sea-Level.html

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-262

    Massive flooding is suspected of playing a major role. Most relevantly, this is described as a temporary effect: "as water is swapped back-and-forth between the continents and ocean, and does not alter the long-term rise in sea level which results from warming oceans and the melting of the polar icesheets and glaciers worldwide" (Painting).



    M74
    Last edited by m74z00219; 2011-Sep-05 at 03:46 PM. Reason: clarification

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    Quote Originally Posted by m74z00219 View Post
    Hi William and everybody else. An interesting explanation for this drop in sea level was put forth over at skepticalscience and JPL

    Link: http://www.skepticalscience.com/Extr...Sea-Level.html

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-262

    Massive flooding is suspected of playing a major role. Most relevantly, this is described as a temporary effect: "as water is swapped back-and-forth between the continents and ocean, and does not alter the long-term rise in sea level which results from warming oceans and the melting of the polar icesheets and glaciers worldwide" (Painting).



    M74
    Hi m74z00219,

    That sounds like a reasonable explanation. As the water will not stay on the continents, likely we would expect the ocean level to start rising again. (i.e The drop in ocean level is a temporary change.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    Hi m74z00219,

    That sounds like a reasonable explanation. As the water will not stay on the continents, likely we would expect the ocean level to start rising again. (i.e The drop in ocean level is a temporary change.)
    How does that jive with your earlier claim:

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    At that time it was explained that greater precipitation resulted in increased water being deposited on the continents which resulted in ocean levels dropping. That seems odd, as one would think the water deposited on the continents would eventually flow to the ocean and result in a sudden increase in ocean level.
    You seem to easily reject a claim and then embrace it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tusenfem View Post
    How does that jive with your earlier claim:



    You seem to easily reject a claim and then embrace it.
    I suppose I try to keep an open mind and try to keep my emotions out of the issues.

    The ocean level drop in 2010 is the largest drop in satellite history, however, as most are aware there was a significant increase in precipitation in 2010.

    It seems logical that the water will not stay on the continents' surface.

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    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    I suppose I try to keep an open mind and try to keep my emotions out of the issues.

    The ocean level drop in 2010 is the largest drop in satellite history, however, as most are aware there was a significant increase in precipitation in 2010.

    It seems logical that the water will not stay on the continents' surface.
    Well, then why did you ask the following in the OP:

    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    At that time it was explained that greater precipitation resulted in increased water being deposited on the continents which resulted in ocean levels dropping. That seems odd, as one would think the water deposited on the continents would eventually flow to the ocean and result in a sudden increase in ocean level.
    After all, this link , a link YOU PROVIDED in the OP, has the exact same explanation that m74z00219 provided. Yet for some reason, in the OP, you questioned that same explanation as odd, even though it was in a link you provided as support. It appears that you don't even bother to read the links you provide, just look for quotes in those links.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tensor View Post
    Well, then why did you ask the following in the OP:



    After all, this link , a link YOU PROVIDED in the OP, has the exact same explanation that m74z00219 provided. Yet for some reason, in the OP, you questioned that same explanation as odd, even though it was in a link you provided as support. It appears that you don't even bother to read the links you provide, just look for quotes in those links.
    Tensor,

    What I am curious about is the time frame for the ocean level to increase. I would expect the period of time for extra precipitation to flow off of the continents would be 6 months to a year. I did read the entire quote.

    As I said, we can easily check back on ocean level in 6 months to a year to see if the ocean level has risen. Does that sound like a logical approach to you?

    Is there anything else that we write logically about this subject before there is more data?

    I have looked at ever thing I could find on ocean level paleo and current. I started this thread as it seems to be an interesting subject.
    Last edited by William; 2011-Sep-05 at 11:42 PM.

  16. 2011-Sep-05, 09:20 PM

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    Quote Originally Posted by William View Post
    http://www.pas.rochester.edu/~dougla...ress_final.pdf

    Recent energy balance of Earth

    Recently Lyman et al. [1] have estimated a robust global warming trend of 0.63 ± 0.28 W/m2 for Earth during 1993–2008, calculated from ocean heat content anomaly (OHC) data. This value is not representative of the recent (2003–2008) warming/cooling rate because of a “flattening” that occurred around 2001–2002. Using only 2003-2008 data, we find cooling, not warming. This result does not support the existence of a large frequently-cited positive computed radiative imbalance (see, for example, Trenberth and Fasullo [2])
    This "study" is using ARGO data which is known to have serious problems:

    http://agwobserver.wordpress.com/201...-heat-content/

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    What does that have to do with sea levels?

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    Arctic ice produces 0 c water which flows into the ocean at 4 degrees c. Since this is waters maximum density, it sinks to the bottom, where an increasing percentage of 4 degree c water lies. The problem is ocean water with several percent salt has higher density than 4 degree c fresh water, up to about 20? degrees c. So the 4 degree fresh water would float on the surface and freeze to ice shortly before sun rise most of the year. Neil

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilzero View Post
    Arctic ice produces 0 c water which flows into the ocean at 4 degrees c. Since this is waters maximum density, it sinks to the bottom, where an increasing percentage of 4 degree c water lies. The problem is ocean water with several percent salt has higher density than 4 degree c fresh water, up to about 20? degrees c. So the 4 degree fresh water would float on the surface and freeze to ice shortly before sun rise most of the year. Neil
    My bold
    Is that saline or fresh water layer that is increasing? I'm confused.

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilzero View Post
    Arctic ice produces 0 c water which flows into the ocean at 4 degrees c. Since this is waters maximum density, it sinks to the bottom, where an increasing percentage of 4 degree c water lies. The problem is ocean water with several percent salt has higher density than 4 degree c fresh water, up to about 20? degrees c. So the 4 degree fresh water would float on the surface and freeze to ice shortly before sun rise most of the year.
    I'm not entirely sure why the 0C meltwater suddenly becomes 4C when it flows into the ocean. But it doesn't matter, the main point is that meltwater is not saline so when produced in large quantities, it tends to produce a low salinity layer on top of the salt water, and is easier to freeze than salt water. I have observed a similar phenomenon in a narrow but deep Scottish sea loch, L Sunart, where the large quantity of river water flowing in results in a layer of low salinity water lying on the top, which then can then ice over on a cold night more easily than one would normally expect.

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    The same sunshine that melts the ice typically warms the melt water slightly on the way to the ocean. I presume the 4 degree water at the bottom of the ocean is slightly less salty than the average for the ocean. My guess is the water temperature just above the boundary is typically 2 or 3 degrees c, from the last lce age. Perhaps there is no mechanism for increasing, or decreasing the amount of 4 degree water, other than Earthquakes and under sea volcanoes. Neil

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilzero View Post
    I presume the 4 degree water at the bottom of the ocean is slightly less salty than the average for the ocean.
    Ocean bottom water is the result of thermohaline circulation.
    Surface water currents travel poleward gaining salinity and losing heat until they downwell to the ocean bottom.

    The oceans are complex, but density inversions tend to correct themselves.
    Salinity (dissolved solids) greatly outweighs temperature for increasing density.

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    There's also salt rejection to keep in mind as the ocean water cools as it transits poleward in the case of the northern deep water submergence and also off of Antartica as very cold Antarctic winds super cool surface water which eventually sinks to the bottom and as it travels northwards can eventually pass under the slightly warmer North Altantic Deep Water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by neilzero View Post
    I presume the 4 degree water at the bottom of the ocean is slightly less salty than the average for the ocean.
    Seawater does not have a density maximum at 4C. Its density maximum is at its freezing point, -1.8C. At least, according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermohaline_circulation
    This is why sea fish at high latitudes need to be able to survive below 0C. Unlike freshwater fish, they don't have a deep layer of 4C water to escape to.

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    The topic is EXTREMELY interesting - mostly in the variability from year to year: How much is real, and how much is an artifact of measuring errors? Clearly, where some methods show an increase, while others show a decrease - you must assign a composite error factor at least equal to the difference between the two measurements.

    There are reasons to consider, for a mean slight decline, other than increased evaporation: Clearly, the total ice content in the Artic Ocean has decreased substantially. This melting process sucks a LOT of calories out of the surrounding water due to the latent heat of melting as well as increase conductivity and current flow: The breakup is proceding much faster than anticipated and that means more heat is being sucked out of the oceans than predicted. water near both poles may be several degrees cooler; significantly decreasing the total mass of the body.

    There is also the 'belly band' effect: The spinning of the earth transports liquid mediums towards the equatorial axis.

    So there is a lot going on; and the net effect averaged over ten or even five years is clearly upward. How long can we tread water?

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    Sea level data has been updated.

    http://sealevel.colorado.edu/content...ignals-removed

    The European Envisat satellite shows a greater drop in sea level. I am not sure why there is a difference. All satellites show the same downward trend. The European Envisate satellite shows sea level to have dropped to the 2004 level.

    http://www.aviso.oceanobs.com/filead...GIA_Adjust.png

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    http://www.bautforum.com/showthread....26#post1945726

    It would appear due to magnitude of the drop and as the sea level has continued to fall, the explanation of extra water on the continents is no longer valid.

    I am curious as to the next explanation and when the next explanation will occur.

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    This is a link to the map that shows the location of the extra water. Note the extra water on the continents was March 2011. One would expect unless the extra water was in the form of ice on the ice sheets that it would have flowed out to sea.

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/earth...0823b-full.jpg

    The other hypothesis that is being floated is perhaps the rapidly falling sea level is due to colder oceans.

    http://www.osdpd.noaa.gov/data/sst/a...10.13.2011.gif

    The European Envisat satellite measured a fall in sea level of 1.5 cm in one year. It seems unlikely that the oceans could cool sufficiently quickly to result in a fall in sea level of 1.5 cm in one year.

    http://www.aviso.oceanobs.com/filead...GIA_Adjust.png

    I will keep watching this issue and will update the forum is there is new data or another proposed explanation.

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    Some continental surface areas have been experiencing droughts. Perhaps water has not flowed out to sea because it is stuck in reservoirs that were already below capacity and have been for some time (decades). In addition to surface reservoirs, we have also been depleting aquifers, so perhaps some precipitation has gone towards filling those. It may be that, on balance, the sea-level rise in the past century was slightly inflated due to human activity removing water from the continental surface and subsurface and putting it into the oceans. Perhaps we could compare gravity data with areas of water conservation to see if they are increasing in mass.

    Also, as sea levels rise, they may inundate dry areas, temporarily slowing, stopping, or reducing sea level. In addition to that surface volume, wouldn't some of the sea water be absorbed into the dry land also?
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  31. #30
    Join Date
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    This is the data from the European satellite.

    http://www.aviso.oceanobs.com/filead...GIA_Adjust.png

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