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Melusine
2006-Apr-05, 09:38 AM
I forgot to mention this last week, but thought I'd put it down for the record.

The day after the total eclipse I asked my co-worker if she saw it on TV. She said while growing up her mother and others always believed that pregnant women should not go outside during an eclipse, and should fasten a safety pin under their shirt above their belly, so that their child would not be born with a cleft lip.

I said to her, "You know that's not true, right?" She replied, "Yeah, I know, but we still do it anyway."

I asked her if this old wive's tale applied only to total eclipses or partial eclipses as well. She wasn't sure, just that pregnant women should stay indoors. The reasoning was, "Well, I don't really believe it, but just in case, we still do it." I won't bother mentioning a similar corrollary to this. I like my co-worker very much, but she is embedded with all these old customs and alot of "just in case" thinking.

I had never heard this. She grew up in Texas, and I don't know why this idea of a cleft lip came about. I'll search for some info. Her family is Hispanic, so I don't know if this occurs just in Hispanic circles in a cultural sense. All I can say is that these pregnant women have missed out on some good eclipses!

Is anyone familiar with this?

Nowhere Man
2006-Apr-05, 12:16 PM
Suntrack2 brought up the idea of keeping pregnant women during inside about halfway through this thread. (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=33786) I'd never heard of it before, and I'd never heard of the safety-pin thing before you mentioned it. What about all of the cleft lips that happen when the mother WASN'T exposed to an eclipse? Maybe she should have worn a safety pin all the while she was pregnant, "just in case." And what about all of the children who were born without cleft lips, whose mothers were exposed to an eclipse and didn't wear a safety pin?

Just being rhetorical.

Fred

R.A.F.
2006-Apr-05, 12:17 PM
Is anyone familiar with this?

Nope...this is a "new one" for me...

Maksutov
2006-Apr-05, 04:01 PM
This sounds vaguely familiar. It seems to fall into the category of farfetched influences on the pregnant female having an effect on the infant.

The main version of this in Waterbury, CT, where my ex grew up and my in-laws lived, was the old "frightened by a mouse" tale. This said that if the pregnant woman was, for example, frightened by a mouse, the child would have a birthmark shaped like a mouse somewhere on its body. This mindset was found mainly among the Italian and Polish communities, but that didn't keep it from being adopted by the German and Irish groups, of which my in-laws were members.

Strange stuff.

Eroica
2006-Apr-05, 04:30 PM
When my mother was pregnant with my elder sister, she spilt some boiling water from a kettle on her forearm. A friend who was with her at the time told her that when the child was born it would have a birthmark on its arm in the same spot.

A few days after the birth this friend visited my mother and the first thing she did was ask to see the baby's forearm. My mother had forgotten all about the incident with the boiling water, but when she rolled back the baby's sleeve there was the birthmark!

It's still there, and my mother swears to the accuracy of this old-wive's tale.

SciFi Chick
2006-Apr-05, 04:38 PM
When my mom was pregnant, she and my grandmother were watching a documentary about voodoo practices. A scene came up where they slit the neck of a chicken and sprayed the blood around, and my grandmother slapped her hand over my mom's eyes declaring, "Don't look. It will mark the baby." :lol:

Prowler67
2006-Apr-05, 05:00 PM
If I remember right, the whole eclipse myth stared with an ancient civilization, I'm thinking Eqypt or the middle east.

Melusine
2006-Apr-05, 05:23 PM
I think my co-worker is annoyed that I keep asking her about this. She doesn't know the significance of the safety pin - it was just passed down to her.

Safety pin ---> cleft lip? Why would someone think a safety pin would work, or is it just a handy thing around the house?

OK, let's assume you all are at least 40 years old--that's not that long ago that your mothers would believe this. I haven't read Michael Shermer's book "Why People Believe Weird Things" (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0716733870/ref=wl_it_dp/104-6804462-0668724?%5Fencoding=UTF8&colid=13LSKNGSEP3KA&coliid=IYDTWWO140XK8&v=glance&n=283155), but I have it saved on Amazon. I am really surprised that she/they still do this and advise others to do it as well. I need to get his book now. :eh:

Melusine
2006-Apr-05, 09:23 PM
Here's a different tidbit I got today. Somebody asked how I was doing and I said, "Oh, things have been a bit strange lately." And with all seriousness, he said, "It's because Mercury is in retrograde."

I almost burst out in laughter--he was so serious about it. He's a nice guy, sells crystal lamps and such, but very nice.

So, THAT's the problem...Mercury is in retrograde. Oh, it all makes sense now! :rolleyes:

(Actually I Googled it and it's "no longer in retrograde," plus the astrology site got ACCESS DENIED)

Gillianren
2006-Apr-05, 09:51 PM
I think my co-worker is annoyed that I keep asking her about this. She doesn't know the significance of the safety pin - it was just passed down to her.

Safety pin ---> cleft lip? Why would someone think a safety pin would work, or is it just a handy thing around the house?

And what did people do before the safety pin was invented?

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2006-Apr-06, 01:04 AM
I LOVE Things Like This ...

This Is Actually, One of The Few Times When Being Jewish, Simplifies Life ...

Instead of Psuedoscientific Parables, we Tell Each Other This (http://www.snopes.com/weddings/newlywed/secret.asp), Instead!

:think:

Melusine
2006-Apr-06, 01:52 AM
And what did people do before the safety pin was invented?
I did a search on "pregnant women solar eclipse safety pins," and this is first one up (a pathetically slow-cached link on DSL):


If a pregnant woman wears red underwear with a safety pin tucked into it, will it make her newborn child healthier? No self-respecting physician would say so. But the possibility may be worth considering, thanks to a phenomenon scientists call the "Latino health paradox."...

SNIP

What does this have to do with wearing red underwear when you're pregnant? Well, during lunar or solar eclipses, expectant mothers from Mexico (and some other parts of Latin America) frequently wear bright red panties with a safety pin tucked through them, the result of a tradition dating back to Aztec days. Seems the Aztecs (or maybe the Mayans, depending on whose research you believe) thought the eclipse released energy that could cause birth defects. To ward off its power, pregnant women wouldn't go outside without tying a red string around their waists with an arrowhead attached to it. Eventually, as superstition gave way to comfort, the string and arrowhead evolved into a pair of panties with a safety pin attached. And wouldn't you know it? Hispanic women are less likely to have low-birthweight babies than the average American, even though the average American gets much more sustained--and much better quality--medical care during pregnancy.

New Republic 9/5/03 (http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:dEINMcTiyHkJ:www.tnr.com/doc.mhtml%3Fi%3D20030908%26s%3Ddiarist090803+pregn ant+women+solar+eclipse+safety+pin&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=1)



Then on the first page, too, there's a forum for pregnant women to chat. I know Bestskeptical would have a field day with this, her being in the health industry and all! Some comments:


March 2006
Crisy about the Lunar Eclipse - what's the deal on it?! My mom always mentions there's this one eclipse that's not good for preggo's .... do you have any idea when the eclipse is going to happen? But I think it might be the solar she's talking about..she always said avoid metal objects. I'm not sure if it's an old wives tale but if there is an eclipse can you let me know when?? ...

Answer: Hey Iakram. Regarding the lunar eclipse, someone at work told me about it. They say that women are influenced by the moon and that it can influence labour. When I was working at the hospital, we always had so many women in labour during a full moon. I'm assuming that the eclipse is not a good thing because I was getting +++ contractions today and because my mood was affected. I'll try to find out the exact day that the eclipse will be on. ...

Answer: Hi Crisy. I was thinking back to the whole eclipse thing - it's the solar that's not good. Ah the lunar has to do with contractions I see. Shucks that's too bad you can't take anymore time off. Can you ask for
Pregnancy Info Net (http://72.14.203.104/search?q=cache:SnMWY9xkgfEJ:www.pregnancy-info.net/QA/answers-MOMS_DUE_IN_JULY_WHO_HAD_PREVIOUS_MISCARRIAGES_PAR T_TWO/+pregnant+women+solar+eclipse+safety+pin&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=4)


We are in 2006, right? :shifty: Is there anyone here, especially someone who has been pregnant, that thinks a solar eclipse or lunar eclipse affects pregnancy?

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2006-Apr-06, 03:01 AM
I Would Expect a SMALL Effect ...

Ya' Know, Like When a Pregnant Woman Does Anything Fun and Exciting ...

Her Whole Body Fills Up With Endorphins, And The Resulting Baby Is All The Better for it!

:dance:

Wolverine
2006-Apr-06, 11:37 AM
I'd seen an odd collection of eclipse superstitions in this article (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4852690.stm) from last week. However, since the Beeb's been singing the praises of utter quackery in the form of "alternative medicines" (e.g. homeopathy) for a while now and pandering to its supporters, I just can't put too much stock in their "science" reporting any longer.

Sweety
2006-Apr-06, 11:40 AM
In India on solar eclipse people don't eat anything while sun is behind the eclipse shadow. After solar eclipse it is nessesary to take a bath at any cost.

I am lucky that my mom didn't tell me to do this ever. I enjoy watching eclipse while having my meal or snack.

People say eclipses are the shadow of an evil which is cut in two peices: head and body
and the name of two peices are Rahu Ketu.

Fram
2006-Apr-07, 08:25 AM
I had never heard this one. The only pregnancy prjudices I know about around here are (apart from the labour at full moon one) that the shape of the belly indicates if its a boy or a girl (and this one is correct in half the cases, so there must be something to it), and that if a pregnant women reaches above her (stretches her arms above the head), the umbilical cord will be around the neck of the baby.

John Dlugosz
2006-Apr-07, 05:59 PM
"Oh, things have been a bit strange lately." And with all seriousness, he said, "It's because Mercury is in retrograde."
...
So, THAT's the problem...Mercury is in retrograde. Oh, it all makes sense now! :rolleyes:

I thought that only planets farther from the sun then Earth can be in retrograde?

Maksutov
2006-Apr-07, 07:04 PM
I thought that only planets farther from the sun then Earth can be in retrograde?Per the Columbia Encyclopedia (http://www.bartleby.com/65/re/retrogra.html) any planet as seen from Earth can be in retrograde, which is defined as an apparent east-to-west motion against the background stars. The inferior planets Mercury and Venus will display this motion between greatest eastern elongation and greatest western elongation, when they are close to inferior conjunction. For the superior planets, retrograde is around the time of opposition.

tadowe
2006-Apr-10, 08:44 AM
It is all wrapped up in "heuristics" and how we "learn."

For example, there isn't any scientist out there who will admit that concepts like the Big-Bang, dark matter, or black-holes are anything but established fact -- or "true!"

Red-shift is an absolute measure of distance, Temple1 is full of H2O and generates more x-rays <b>mechanically</b> than our moon and the strong electric force on works "locally" and can't produce gigantic dust devils on Mars -- only the mechanical radiation from the Sun can do so . . . ad nauseam . . .

Fram
2006-Apr-10, 09:32 AM
Tadowe, how has your post anything at all to do with this thread?

Jerry
2006-Apr-10, 06:16 PM
It is really sad -

I have a 19th century sex manual (The creation of a new life.) That explains all of the things a woman should and should not do while pregnant, and all the dire consequences. Most important, was keeping thoughts pure and high-minded - for example, if you wanted the child to be an artist, you should spend much of the pregnancy studying art.

So if your child had a clef lip, or any other deformity, it was clearly the fault of the mother. Maternal twins were once thought to be proof of adultry. The guilt imposed upon mothers whenever a child is born that is less than perfect was, and still is tragic.

That said, an eclipse does present a unique gravitational/electromagnetic environment, and it would be interesting to determine if a statistical link of some kind could be established between eclipses and odd cell division. (Obviously, the likely answer is a great big NO.)

skyline5k
2006-Apr-12, 12:58 AM
Eventually, as superstition gave way to comfort, the string and arrowhead evolved into a pair of panties with a safety pin attached.
Oddly enough, it's not just the hispanics/aztecs. In China, whatever "year" you're born in; i.e. dog year, tiger year...(12 in total), if it's your year again, girls need to wear something red. Generally it's their underwear.

Not to sound perverted or anything, but when my girlfriend & I are in downtown Shanghai, and some girls are ahead of us & just a hint of their red underwear is sticking out of their jeans, I'll look at my girlfriend & say, "She must be 24."

endeavour
2006-Apr-12, 04:28 AM
My mother, who is 72 and raised in an Australian country town has never heard of either of the eclipse superstitions mentioned in regard to pregnancy. Perhaps these stories never made their way down under? As it happens, she was pregnant during a (partial) solar eclipse and she did go outside to watch it..and my brother is perfectly alright (maybe the effect only works during a total eclipse? :-) )

Mum did say that my grandmother, who would be 106 if she was still alive, did believe that a pre-natal shock could be transferred to the baby as a birthmark. And I have a friend in her late 40s who is fully convinced that her birthmark is the result of her mother being denied something she craved during pregnancy!

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2006-Apr-12, 05:07 AM
My mother, who is 72 and raised in an Australian country town has never heard of either of the eclipse superstitions mentioned in regard to pregnancy. Perhaps these stories never made their way down under? As it happens, she was pregnant during a (partial) solar eclipse and she did go outside to watch it..and my brother is perfectly alright (maybe the effect only works during a total eclipse? :-) )

Mum did say that my grandmother, who would be 106 if she was still alive, did believe that a pre-natal shock could be transferred to the baby as a birthmark. And I have a friend in her late 40s who is fully convinced that her birthmark is the result of her mother being denied something she craved during pregnancy!
Ok ...

Why Are People, Still This IGNOURANT ...

Are Schools Doing Nothing?

aporetic_r
2006-Apr-12, 04:29 PM
Ok ...

Why Are People, Still This IGNOURANT ...

Are Schools Doing Nothing?

Alas, Zaphod, this is the result of schools working extremely hard. I can attest that no matter how hard we work to educate our students on a given topic, very few of them will actually absorb the material. On my last test 46% of students missed a question that I repeatedly told them would be on the test.

Aporetic

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2006-Apr-12, 10:22 PM
Alas, Zaphod, this is the result of schools working extremely hard. I can attest that no matter how hard we work to educate our students on a given topic, very few of them will actually absorb the material. On my last test 46% of students missed a question that I repeatedly told them would be on the test.

Aporetic
That SUCKS ...

Do I Even, Wanna Know ...

What The Question Was?

aporetic_r
2006-Apr-12, 11:02 PM
That SUCKS ...

Do I Even, Wanna Know ...

What The Question Was?

It was a multiple-choice question asking them how many votes it takes in the US Senate to approve a presidential nomination (such as the nomination of a federal judge). That may appear to be a rather obscure question, until on realizes the following: 1) When I told them that it takes a majority vote, I also told them that it would be on the test; 2) During the class prior to the test, we have a review session, and I told them that the question would be on the test and gave them the answer again; 3) A mere 48 hours later was the test, and I always begin a test by asking if anybody has any last minute questions. One student asked me to go over how many votes it takes in the Senate to approve a nomination, since it was going to be on the test. I told the class yet again, and then gave them the test. That's how 46% of them got it wrong.

Aporetic

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2006-Apr-12, 11:55 PM
It was a multiple-choice question asking them how many votes it takes in the US Senate to approve a presidential nomination (such as the nomination of a federal judge). That may appear to be a rather obscure question, until on realizes the following: 1) When I told them that it takes a majority vote, I also told them that it would be on the test; 2) During the class prior to the test, we have a review session, and I told them that the question would be on the test and gave them the answer again; 3) A mere 48 hours later was the test, and I always begin a test by asking if anybody has any last minute questions. One student asked me to go over how many votes it takes in the Senate to approve a nomination, since it was going to be on the test. I told the class yet again, and then gave them the test. That's how 46% of them got it wrong.

Aporetic
You Wanna Hear, REALLY Creepy ...

I Already Knew The Answer to That Question, Probably Because it Was on Quite a Few Tests ...

So, What Was The Most Popular Mistake, Two-Thirds?

aporetic_r
2006-Apr-13, 05:42 PM
You Wanna Hear, REALLY Creepy ...

I Already Knew The Answer to That Question, Probably Because it Was on Quite a Few Tests ...

So, What Was The Most Popular Mistake, Two-Thirds?

Yes, the most popular mistake was 2/3.

It is especially funny that many students complain about having to take American Government in college. They say that they shouldn't have to take it again because they have already had it twice, in both middle school and high school. Then they prove why they have to take it again.

Aporetic

Grey
2006-Apr-13, 06:24 PM
...the shape of the belly indicates if its a boy or a girl (and this one is correct in half the cases, so there must be something to it)...:D

Unregistered
2007-Mar-09, 03:28 AM
This belief is strong in hispanic communites. In my region of Texas, we only use the safety pin to fasten a key, because according to those who believe this, the key is what protects the fetus from harm. When my mother was pregnant with me, there was en eclipse (not sure whether full or partial) but when I was born, I came out fine (and my mother will swear it was because she wore the key) and there were several babies who were born with a cleft lip. My mother and grandmother will use this as irrefutable evidence that a key should be worn during an eclipse, especially since multiple babies had the same problem. I just dismiss it as craziness, kinda like the "mal de ojo" sickness a baby gets. Anyone ever heard of that? It involves rubbing an egg on a feverish baby....Hopefully these crazy beliefs will fade out with time and science class.

pulsarX
2007-Mar-28, 12:37 PM
In India this belief is very prevalent. Safety pins ain't used though,

Occam
2007-Mar-29, 12:16 AM
Some beliefs are hard to shake. The Chinese habit of loudly banging gongs and drums during solar eclipses is one. The reasoning is hard to argue with.
An eclipse is caused by a dragon trying to swallow the sun.
The gongs and drums frighten the dragon into releasing the sun.
Any argument against this idea can be countered by the reasoning that it ALWAYS works.

Comets are harbingers of evil. It's an incontrovertible fact that whenever a comet has appeared in the skies, terrible things have happened.
This would only be significant, of course, if terrible things did NOT happen in the absence of comets.

Noclevername
2007-Apr-19, 05:15 AM
This rock keeps away tigers!

It must work, there's never been a tiger around here...

BigDon
2007-Apr-19, 05:20 PM
Well, its still better than the quaint Nigerian custom of putting a woman to death for bearing twins. (The twins gotta go too BTW) A friend of mine who was a headmistress at a all girls school in Lagos always came back to the states to give birth for just that reason. The citizenship issue was secondary.

Peter Wilson
2007-Apr-19, 07:44 PM
I keep hearing about Nigerian widows who leave behind $26,000,000 in unclaimed bank accounts.

Can't help but wonder if the twin-thing is just a ruse to go after their money?

:think:

BigDon
2007-Apr-19, 11:25 PM
Naaww, its the obvious logic of "One soul per conception" bit. That means one of the twins is souless and therefore an abomination. Jeez Pete, smart guy like you should have seen that.

Peter Wilson
2007-Apr-20, 12:13 AM
:doh:

So you have to kill both, to make sure you get the one that is the abomination?

BigDon
2007-Apr-20, 03:23 AM
Sure!

Killing just gave birth women and new borns is much more noble and safe than allowing an abomination to survive.

zenbudda
2007-Apr-20, 06:17 PM
another interesting myth amongst the mexican-american (and in most cases, just plain ol mexican) communities where i grew up was that if you stared at a rainbow, you'd get a sty (sp?) on your eyelid.

zenbudda
2007-Apr-20, 06:19 PM
oh, and there's also "ojo" (pronounced o-ho with short o's). whenever you are in a house around a newborn/infant, you can't just look at the baby, you have to touch, otherwise you'll get it sick. ojo is eye in mexican. i think this is similar to the "evil eye" myth.

Peter Wilson
2007-Apr-20, 07:07 PM
Sure!

Killing just gave birth women and new borns is much more noble and safe than allowing an abomination to survive.
I have an evil-twin brother (people mistake us all the time)--well I call him that, anyway (heh-heh).

But how do I know which one of us is the good one and which the bad?

Edit: On 2nd thought, please don't answer that one!

HenrikOlsen
2007-Apr-20, 08:09 PM
Which one is the guy with the gun?

BigDon
2007-Apr-21, 03:34 AM
another interesting myth amongst the mexican-american (and in most cases, just plain ol mexican) communities where i grew up was that if you stared at a rainbow, you'd get a sty (sp?) on your eyelid.

Now Budda, according to my stepfather, who was raised in rural Louisianna, stys are caused by urinating in the street.

(Had fun with that one when my oldest daughter came down with a sty a couple of weeks back.)

Unregistered
2007-Sep-04, 09:46 PM
This has always been a talked about thing in a hispanic culture. I never put much interest into it until now. I am 3 months pregnant and so is my cousin. The pin wearing is more than just the lip it is also about deformaties a baby can be caused by it. Unfortunatly we had an eclipse this past Tuesday, my cousin was unaware and did not wear the safety pin. Sad to say, she lost her baby. Now am not saying it was due to the eclipse but it might have contributed to it.

01101001
2007-Sep-04, 10:01 PM
Now am not saying it was due to the eclipse but it might have contributed to it.

Wikipedia: Demon Haunted World by Carl Sagan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Demon-Haunted_World)

Let science be your candle.

Jhalak
2007-Sep-10, 07:32 PM
Can any one tell me what is this safety pin and where to were it. Thanks.

Gillianren
2007-Sep-10, 08:38 PM
Can any one tell me what is this safety pin and where to were it. Thanks.

Well, the "where to wear it" is "don't bother." It doesn't do anything. Logic would indicate that it's a fairly new piece of folk belief, however, since the safety pin is pretty new, historically speaking.

Glutomoto
2007-Sep-10, 10:16 PM
This wikipedia page will tell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safety_pin) you what the saftey pin is, and has a picture. It goes on to say there was an ancient version invented by the Mycenaeans during the 14th century B.C. But that one was lost in time until the modern reinvention in 1849.

justintree
2007-Nov-21, 02:17 AM
It is really sad -

I have a 19th century sex manual (The creation of a new life.) That explains all of the things a woman should and should not do while pregnant, and all the dire consequences. Most important, was keeping thoughts pure and high-minded - for example, if you wanted the child to be an artist, you should spend much of the pregnancy studying art.

So if your child had a clef lip, or any other deformity, it was clearly the fault of the mother. Maternal twins were once thought to be proof of adultry. The guilt imposed upon mothers whenever a child is born that is less than perfect was, and still is tragic.

That said, an eclipse does present a unique gravitational/electromagnetic environment, and it would be interesting to determine if a statistical link of some kind could be established between eclipses and odd cell division. (Obviously, the likely answer is a great big NO.)

Sorry for diggin up an old post...but that sounds like it may be somewhat reasonable. We know, scientifically, that a woman's experiences can have an effect on her baby while pregnant (now I'm not agreeing with stuff like not having your craving = weird birthmarks, I'm referring to situations like emotions resulting in different chemical releases that end up affecting the little one).

Could it not be possible that a visual connection exists between baby and child? Have there been scientific studies made?

I'm not much of a biology buff, so if I'm wrong feel free to rip my previous paragraphs to shreds...(woo physics!)

Van Rijn
2007-Dec-01, 12:18 AM
Can any one tell me what is this safety pin and where to were it. Thanks.

Just noticed this. It's probably too late (I doubt you're still on the forum) but if you are, could you tell me: Are you taking this safety pin thing seriously, and if so, why?

ravens_cry
2008-Jan-12, 09:35 AM
I think a lot of superstitions come from the difficulty of telling the difference between something happening at the same time or one after the other, and there been a true correlation. That is why we have scientists after all. But science is expensive, both in time and materials, a hunter gatherer would be unlikely to have the free time to test repeatedly if say scaring a pregnant woman would harm the baby. That and the power of gossip and language and you have the makings of a myth.

narender
2008-Jan-14, 10:23 AM
Not going in the story in particular...but I do believe in effect of gravitational effects on body(in space for sure ) here..
What kinda ? well have yet to explore..(may be any of you have better idea of the intensity ) but there is a significant of things which do affected by it and there is no need to call it superstitiousness ..yeah when people do certain religious acts that might be a different case..but scientifically the concept has all solid foundation to explore..

pghnative
2008-Jan-15, 03:20 PM
...but I do believe in effect of gravitational effects on body(in space for sure ) here..
<snip>..(may be any of you have better idea of the intensity ).. I suspect that if you do the math, you'll learn that there is no significant gravitation difference between

a)a new moon wherein the moon eclipses the sun
b)a new moon wherein the moon passes just a little north (or south) of the sun, and therefore doesn't eclipse it

Electromagnetic effects also seem unimportant. After all, which of the following makes a bigger difference (electromagnetically) to a human:

1) being involved in a solar eclipse (in which the sun's electromagnetic effects are blocked for ~ 2 min) or
2)being involved in nighttime (in which the sun's electromagnetic effects are blocked for ~ 12 hours)

Sean Clayden
2008-Feb-01, 12:01 PM
Absolute ********. What happens happens, you cant have any predictive messages. Its random, boy or girl ? If you can predict it you would be worth millions........(in china)

LordVido
2008-Feb-10, 05:46 AM
I suspect that if you do the math, you'll learn that there is no significant gravitation difference between

a)a new moon wherein the moon eclipses the sun
b)a new moon wherein the moon passes just a little north (or south) of the sun, and therefore doesn't eclipse it

Electromagnetic effects also seem unimportant. After all, which of the following makes a bigger difference (electromagnetically) to a human:

1) being involved in a solar eclipse (in which the sun's electromagnetic effects are blocked for ~ 2 min) or
2)being involved in nighttime (in which the sun's electromagnetic effects are blocked for ~ 12 hours)

I'm glad you commented on this, because I was about to, until I got to the end of the thread and saw that you already have.

I'll, though, go a little further. An eclipse only has to do with line of sight. The moon's orbit is slightly tilted to the Earth's orbit around the Sun. The moon passes between the sun and earth EVERY Month but only sometimes (about every year and a half) will you get a total solar eclipse, and since the moons shadow is so small, it is only seen in totality on a small area of the earth.

In any case there are times when the moon is closer or farther, whether during an eclipse or not (an annular eclipse is a visible example). What I'm getting at is you have a similar gravitational line-up EVERY month. If you visit the inverse square law of the effects of gravity, the difference is negligible. Even if this wasn't the case, though, the moon may or may not be closer at any given time the moon is between the earth and sun, regardless of a "line of sight event" we call an eclipse. So IF gravity did play a role, it would not be because of an eclipse, but because of its distance from earth.

One more thing, we are much closer to the center of the Earth than the moon and the Earth has more mass, therefore the Earth's gravity should have a lot more effect on us . . . .

-LV

By the way I'm new to this forum, so Hi!!!

Gillianren
2008-Feb-10, 07:13 AM
Welcome aboard! Read the rules and stay awhile.

Halcyon Dayz
2008-Feb-11, 01:09 AM
One more thing, we are much closer to the center of the Earth than the moon and the Earth has more mass, therefore the Earth's gravity should have a lot more effect on us . . . .

And it does.

It keeps our feet firmly planted on the ground.

At least with most of us...

mperez
2008-Feb-19, 12:55 AM
I forgot to mention this last week, but thought I'd put it down for the record.

The day after the total eclipse I asked my co-worker if she saw it on TV. She said while growing up her mother and others always believed that pregnant women should not go outside during an eclipse, and should fasten a safety pin under their shirt above their belly, so that their child would not be born with a cleft lip.

I said to her, "You know that's not true, right?" She replied, "Yeah, I know, but we still do it anyway."

I asked her if this old wive's tale applied only to total eclipses or partial eclipses as well. She wasn't sure, just that pregnant women should stay indoors. The reasoning was, "Well, I don't really believe it, but just in case, we still do it." I won't bother mentioning a similar corrollary to this. I like my co-worker very much, but she is embedded with all these old customs and alot of "just in case" thinking.

I had never heard this. She grew up in Texas, and I don't know why this idea of a cleft lip came about. I'll search for some info. Her family is Hispanic, so I don't know if this occurs just in Hispanic circles in a cultural sense. All I can say is that these pregnant women have missed out on some good eclipses!

Is anyone familiar with this?

YES! im currently 3months and also hispanic well... my mom just reminded me that their is a eclipse 20th &21st and i have college and work so i cant miss but she insist that i stay home! I have no idea what to do

ravens_cry
2008-Feb-20, 06:26 PM
A man sees that the man sitting across from him on the train is calmly shredding his newspaper and tossing the bits out the window. "What the devil are you doing man?" the man asks. The newspaper ripper calmly replies, "I am keeping the elephants out of England." To which the first man answers "But sir, there are no elephants in England." To which the second man triumphantly answers, "Works well, doesn't it?"
That, mixed with religion, and the power of tradition, ("I like tradition, that way even the dead get a vote") and you have the reasons for most superstitions pretty well summed up in my opinion. And sometimes, the occasional correlation.

Ilya
2008-Feb-20, 08:06 PM
YES! im currently 3months and also hispanic well... my mom just reminded me that their is a eclipse 20th &21st and i have college and work so i cant miss but she insist that i stay home! I have no idea what to do

Tell your mom it's a lunar eclipse, not solar. Also, it does not begin until 8:43 pm Eastern time -- wouldn't you be home by then anyway?

Unregistered
2008-Feb-21, 12:04 AM
yes i have heard about the safety pin & the red underwear, it is something most hispanics believe in. well right now i am 35 weeks pregnant =] & there is going to be a total lunar eclipse tonite. & since my mom was born & raised in mexico she knows alot about all these little superstitous things..so last night she went & bought me red underwear & a box of saftey pins lol even though i dont really believe this, i am still gonna go along just for the doubts.

Gillianren
2008-Feb-21, 03:25 AM
yes i have heard about the safety pin & the red underwear, it is something most hispanics believe in. well right now i am 35 weeks pregnant =] & there is going to be a total lunar eclipse tonite. & since my mom was born & raised in mexico she knows alot about all these little superstitous things..so last night she went & bought me red underwear & a box of saftey pins lol even though i dont really believe this, i am still gonna go along just for the doubts.

First, why are so many unregistered people able to post in this thread? Weird.

Second . . . what doubts? There's no scientifically sound explanation for it; there is much evidence that it's bogus. Depending on the cut, red underwear is nice to have, and it never hurts to have a box of safety pins around the house--especially in a house which will have a baby in it soon!--but seriously, no doubts involved.

jayvinton
2008-Feb-22, 12:27 AM
I'm Hispanic, and I grew up in Texas. It is still a belief among some hispanics. Just like all cultures, there are customs and beliefs that betray common sense.

My grandmother was the local neighborhood "Curandera", or healer. This was not some border town neighborhood, it was a suburb of Dallas. Many times as a child with a cold or flu or whatever, a ritual was performed at my bed involving an egg, broom straws floated on the egg in the shape of the trinity, and a bunch of bible reading and incantations. Did it work? Beats me, but it was creepy.

Unregistered
2008-Feb-28, 12:51 AM
When my mother was pregnant with my elder sister, she spilt some boiling water from a kettle on her forearm. A friend who was with her at the time told her that when the child was born it would have a birthmark on its arm in the same spot.

A few days after the birth this friend visited my mother and the first thing she did was ask to see the baby's forearm. My mother had forgotten all about the incident with the boiling water, but when she rolled back the baby's sleeve there was the birthmark!

It's still there, and my mother swears to the accuracy of this old-wive's tale.


I completely agree. My mom has told me of similar stuff happening to people that she knew in the 70s. Someone in her church nicked their finger in the kitchen and the baby had a scar on his finger at the same location. And Second person was my moms aunt. She was pregnant and was dying a white fabric red on the day of the solar eclipse. Unfortunately half of the fabric was dyed. The baby's entire body was two colors. Half red and half white. I've even met that cousin. Initially the doctors thought that it was hemangioma and would disappear with age. But it didn't.

I'm not sure how much truth there is to all this. But my mom has seen too many cases and she's a doctor. There's no scientific proof but if I'm pregnant I wouldn't take any chances. I would just sit in my bed and not do anything to be on the safe side.

Unregistered
2008-Mar-16, 01:55 PM
I forgot to mention this last week, but thought I'd put it down for the record.

The day after the total eclipse I asked my co-worker if she saw it on TV. She said while growing up her mother and others always believed that pregnant women should not go outside during an eclipse, and should fasten a safety pin under their shirt above their belly, so that their child would not be born with a cleft lip.

I said to her, "You know that's not true, right?" She replied, "Yeah, I know, but we still do it anyway."

I asked her if this old wive's tale applied only to total eclipses or partial eclipses as well. She wasn't sure, just that pregnant women should stay indoors. The reasoning was, "Well, I don't really believe it, but just in case, we still do it." I won't bother mentioning a similar corrollary to this. I like my co-worker very much, but she is embedded with all these old customs and alot of "just in case" thinking.

I had never heard this. She grew up in Texas, and I don't know why this idea of a cleft lip came about. I'll search for some info. Her family is Hispanic, so I don't know if this occurs just in Hispanic circles in a cultural sense. All I can say is that these pregnant women have missed out on some good eclipses!

Is anyone familiar with this?

My brother has a birth mark behind both his ears (which looks like a deep nail mark) and my mother says that she pinched her ear during an eclipse(when she was carrying my brother) in order to test this myth about pregnancy and birth mark. She says that the first thing she did after my brother was born to look for a mark behind his ears and was amazed to find one. I am a firm believer in science and to this day i can't figure out how such a thing can happen.

My brother is 25 now and he still has this 'pinch mark' behind his ears. I reckon a few things in this planet are beyond our knowledge.

A.K.Siva

aurora
2008-Mar-16, 02:29 PM
I am a firm believer in science and to this day i can't figure out how such a thing can happen.



I'm not a "believer" in science. I'm a believer in facts and evidence, and the scientific method is the best way humans have come up with to use facts and evidence to learn about the universe.

I don't see anyone suggesting any possible mechanisms that could possibly cause the effects being described by the unregistered participants.

The most likely explanations are various combinations of coincidence, exaggeration, and fabrication.

In the IT industry, one author described a "cargo cult" syndrome that seems to be common in some software shops. If something is seen to work, then everyone jumps on it without understanding it. If the boss wears a green hat, and we have a good day, then green hats for everyone!

HenrikOlsen
2008-Mar-16, 10:54 PM
First, why are so many unregistered people able to post in this thread? Weird.

I guess it's linked to commentary on the Blog, so nonmembers who post commentary there shows up as unregistered here.

Unregistered
2008-Mar-27, 11:15 PM
hi,
this eclipses birthmark is true. As i experence in my family. my one cousin has eclipses birthmark as his dad gave tumb print in his office. when his wife was pragnet. so the my cousin got tumb print shape on his chin.

an other friend got eclipses birthmark on the head as his dad drop ink port. while mother pregnat.

one firend got staple pin mark on his back as his dad was banker at that time.

its all ture its happens.

aurora
2008-Mar-28, 12:01 AM
And that, ladies and gentlemen, is why mythology is prevalent throughout human history.

darkdrag0nlq
2008-Mar-28, 03:22 AM
Maybe the Red underwear simuates a red-shift to fool the evil eclipse demons into leaving the mother alone?



/sarcasm

RedFive
2008-May-01, 02:48 AM
The day after the total eclipse I asked my co-worker if she saw it on TV. She said while growing up her mother and others always believed that pregnant women should not go outside during an eclipse, and should fasten a safety pin under their shirt above their belly, so that their child would not be born with a cleft lip. The part I like best about this story is wouldn't a solar eclipse be the safest time to be outside..? That is, assuming you don't get injured from all the rioting that ensues (usually started by myself) at the realization that the sun has disappeared forever and we must all repent since the end of civilization is nigh.

Unregistered
2008-Jul-30, 01:12 AM
In Feb. this year, I had looked at the lunar eclipse, later going to bed but massaging my all of my legs because of pregnancy cramping. Many members of my family gave me heck. I didn't think much of it.

I had my baby in March through induction (because of quick deliveries). She was born with light marks on both legs extending from the buttocks down to the ankles. In about 1 wk, they darkened tremendously. I was never much of a serious believer in "old wives tales".

Her name...Quillen (pronounced Keejen) meaning "Beauty"(male version) Initially I had only known the male version, but I thought it fit her nicely... After I designated the name legally, I found out the female version meaning... means "Moon".

Unregistered
2008-Aug-01, 01:49 AM
My mom was just talking about that !
But instead of a safety pin she says that you need to wear all red!

Whirlpool
2008-Aug-01, 02:09 AM
In Feb. this year, I had looked at the lunar eclipse, later going to bed but massaging my all of my legs because of pregnancy cramping. Many members of my family gave me heck. I didn't think much of it.

I had my baby in March through induction (because of quick deliveries). She was born with light marks on both legs extending from the buttocks down to the ankles. In about 1 wk, they darkened tremendously. I was never much of a serious believer in "old wives tales".

Her name...Quillen (pronounced Keejen) meaning "Beauty"(male version) Initially I had only known the male version, but I thought it fit her nicely... After I designated the name legally, I found out the female version meaning... means "Moon".

Maybe a coincidence , but I believe there is a genetic explanation for the birth marks.
I don't believe in myths, that's why they are called "Myths".

Neverfly
2008-Aug-01, 02:28 AM
Maybe a coincidence , but I believe there is a genetic explanation for the birth marks.
I don't believe in myths, that's why they are called "Myths".

Exactly.
Birthmarks happen all the time, with or without eclipses or day or night.

I have a birthmark on my left forearm.
My son has one on the small of his back.

What strange supernatural circumstances can I blame for these common occurrences?

I also happen to have hair on top of my head and... Get This: I was born at 2 in the morning!
Obviously- early morning births result in hairy heads.

Whirlpool
2008-Aug-01, 06:27 AM
Hmm.. this is interesting .

Myths & Rituals during Eclipse (http://starryskies.com/The_sky/events/lunar-2003/eclipse7.html)


Chinese

The Moon was represented by a mirror in China. During an eclipse, people beating on mirrors is a very old tradition. It was believed that a dragon swallowed the Moon during an eclipse and beating the mirrors would cause the dragon to cough it up and return it to the sky.

Tobin Dax
2008-Aug-03, 06:29 AM
In Feb. this year, I had looked at the lunar eclipse, later going to bed but massaging my all of my legs because of pregnancy cramping. Many members of my family gave me heck. I didn't think much of it.

[snip] I was never much of a serious believer in "old wives tales".

I'm sure that you did many other things on other days before rubbing your legs, too. I do seriously doubt that you rubbed your child's legs at all, though.