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2002-Nov-20, 06:12 AM
I am tour guide at our state museum. We are soon to host an exhibition titled To Mars And Beyond. It includes information displays about the past, present and future of space travel.

I am doing some research about the Saturn V rocket and am having no trouble finding the technical information but I would like to get some more descriptive / emotional information so that I can catch the imagination of the non-techie / non-astonomer type of visitor - hey I still get a lump in my throat when I see footage of a Saturn V launch but most people probably don't like the Saturn V that much.

If someone can point me in the direction of some sort of archive information - say a newpapers or magazine covering the launch of Apollo 7, 8 or 11 that would be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance for your assistance.

SiriMurthy
2002-Nov-20, 06:30 PM
...but most people probably don't like the Saturn V that much.


Are you kidding me? Saturn V the *THE* space launch vehicle to me. It is (was?) very impressive for the time (actually even now). I built a model of Saturn V that is almost a meter in height and later built a space shuttle model that is about half the height.

Whoever looks at the models stare at the Saturn V in admiration than the shuttle.

I have human figures scaled down to the same scale and that adds to the effect.

No, I still think Saturn V is the best and most impressive vehicle ever built.

Valiant Dancer
2002-Nov-20, 07:41 PM
On 2002-11-20 01:12, steve_remington wrote:
I am tour guide at our state museum. We are soon to host an exhibition titled To Mars And Beyond. It includes information displays about the past, present and future of space travel.

I am doing some research about the Saturn V rocket and am having no trouble finding the technical information but I would like to get some more descriptive / emotional information so that I can catch the imagination of the non-techie / non-astonomer type of visitor - hey I still get a lump in my throat when I see footage of a Saturn V launch but most people probably don't like the Saturn V that much.

If someone can point me in the direction of some sort of archive information - say a newpapers or magazine covering the launch of Apollo 7, 8 or 11 that would be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance for your assistance.




Saturn V not exciting?

As one of the few folks here who doesn't own a telescope and is not an astronomer, I can tell you that in my opinion, there is nothing that represents pure adrenaline lifting power than the Saturn V. I've seen the Kennedy Space Center (formerly Cape Canaveral) Saturn V on display. It is awe inspiring. Even lying on its side in pieces, it made this (at the time) 15 year old boy awestruck in its shadow. Knowing that this was the type of rocket which pushed people to the moon filled me with a great sense pride. The main engine nozzles dwarfed the bus I was standing near.

This site has various recolections about the space race and emotional content related to it.

http://www.wherewereyou.com/

Bob
2002-Nov-20, 08:38 PM
I've seen a few Cape Canaveral launches but was never lucky enough to see a Saturn launch. I've talked to old timers at the base who have seen hundreds of launches, though, and they get a faraway look about witnessing a Saturn launch. That was a rocket that really made the air and ground rumble.

Donnie B.
2002-Nov-20, 09:35 PM
There's a story they tell about the first (unmanned) Saturn V launch. Walter Kronkite was covering the event for CBS. He was in an observation bunker several miles from the pad. The bunker had thick plate glass windows.

As the sound of the launch reached the bunker, the plate glass started vibrating so much that Kronkite was afraid it would shatter. He did the rest of his commentary standing, pressing on the glass with his hands to cushion its vibration so it wouldn't break.

The sound produced by a Saturn V liftoff was the second-loudest man-made sound, second only to a nuclear explosion.

And some thirty brave human beings rode on top of the thing...

ToSeek
2002-Nov-20, 10:18 PM
On 2002-11-20 16:35, Donnie B. wrote:
There's a story they tell about the first (unmanned) Saturn V launch. Walter Kronkite was covering the event for CBS. He was in an observation bunker several miles from the pad. The bunker had thick plate glass windows.

As the sound of the launch reached the bunker, the plate glass started vibrating so much that Kronkite was afraid it would shatter. He did the rest of his commentary standing, pressing on the glass with his hands to cushion its vibration so it wouldn't break.



I hadn't heard about the glass, but there is this mention:

"Five and a half kilometers away, in the studio trailer of the Columbia Broadcasting System, the commentary of CBS correspondent Walter Cronkite was all but
drowned out by the thunder of Saturn's engines, and Cronkite himself was subjected to a shower of debris shaken loose from the walls and ceiling of his broadcasting
booth."

- NASA history: stages to Saturn (http://history.nasa.gov/SP-4206/ch12.htm)

R.A.F.
2002-Nov-20, 11:20 PM
On 2002-11-20 16:35, Donnie B. wrote:
There's a story they tell about the first (unmanned) Saturn V launch. Walter Kronkite was covering the event for CBS. He was in an observation bunker several miles from the pad.

I remember it quite well. Walter was quite surprised by the Saturn Vs power and exclaimed "LOOK AT THAT ROCKET GO!!" He shouted this over the roar and it was kind of funny that he got so excited.

Russ
2002-Nov-20, 11:37 PM
I suggest you get the video casset tape set of Walter Cronkite's commentaries of the whole Saturn program. I'm pretty sure CBS (the TV network for which Walter worked at the time) still publishes them. I don't know the cost.

I watched all of this happen real time as a teenager. Walter was always the very picture of stoic, detatched, objective reporting. Every time he covered a Saturn launch, and any subsequent activities, he was either moved to silence or tears. He openly cried and wiped his tears when the first steps were taken on the Moon.

You want emotions? Look to Walter Cronkite. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif